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Texturing milk for 2 flat whites sorted AT LAST !!!!!

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  • Texturing milk for 2 flat whites sorted AT LAST !!!!!

    Huge improvement on taste and texture for TWO flat whites.

    I have watched and read for months about texturing milk but could never get two flat whites to pour even remotely well and the taste was always below expectations. Then I came across the following CS post from mompt in 2012.
    https://coffeesnobs.com.au/milk-frot...uble-pour.html

    "Micro foam always floats to the top, even seconds after steaming and if you start poring its what comes out first. So poring out 1/3 of the milk into a 2nd jug gets rid of the really dense foam leaving behind good latte milk. After poring your 1st latte from the original jug, you're left with very flat milk, so mixing in the really dense micro foam from the 2nd jug (make sure you tap and swirl) will leave you with excellent latte milk again."

    "Works with any milk based drink. Using this method but altering how much of the micro foam you decant can be very useful. Can almost do milk for caps and flat whites together although I still hate doing that."

    WOW! What a difference! I had tried discarding a bit of the froth from the top of the jug before pouring but that only go me so far. I then tried pouring cup A half full then cup B half full and then trying to finish with latte art on both in turn. But one cup would have stiff foam and the other would have little foam and slosh about in the cup. NOW far better texture and far more even pour on both. Even a little latte art! Also the taste is vastly improved (along with upping the dose from 20 to 22g in Pesado basket).

    And for further latte art help this is a great You Tube video - Jibbi Little 2019 Australian Latte Art Champion and Dom from White Horse Coffee. "Latte Art At Home with Jibbi Little." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_NJ...7-XKX&index=13

  • #2
    Not sure how up-to-date the following technique still is, but if you want to save having to use 2 jugs, you can also use a foam pouring spatula accross the front of the jug spout to hold back some of the foam while pouring the 1st one, then mix in the remaining foam again for the 2nd. Won't do much good of course if you are also doing latte art etc, but practical.


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    GrahamK

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    • #3
      Originally posted by GrahamK View Post
      Not sure how up-to-date the following technique still is, but if you want to save having to use 2 jugs, you can also use a foam pouring spatula accross the front of the jug spout to hold back some of the foam while pouring the 1st one, then mix in the remaining foam again for the 2nd. Won't do much good of course if you are also doing latte art etc, but practical.


      [ATTACH=CONFIG]24645[/ATTACH]


      GrahamK
      Not commonly used anymore. Very outdated technique in a commercial setting. Typically only seen in a place that has older staff/owners.
      At home though if it works for you then go for it

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      • #4
        Originally posted by GrahamK View Post
        Not sure how up-to-date the following technique still is, but if you want to save having to use 2 jugs, you can also use a foam pouring spatula accross the front of the jug spout to hold back some of the foam while pouring the 1st one, then mix in the remaining foam again for the 2nd. Won't do much good of course if you are also doing latte art etc, but practical.


        [ATTACH=CONFIG]24645[/ATTACH]


        GrahamK
        Thanks for the tip. I guess this is a version of using a teaspoon. Although I remember reading some purist saying a good barista should be able to pour without using a spoon

        Still trying for latte art with varying success. But can't get over the difference in taste splitting makes. Much richer smoother coffee in both cups.

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