Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is there something special about steamed milk ?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Is there something special about steamed milk ?

    Hi all.

    Just wondering... Is there something special about milk from a steam wand (for milk coffees of course!)?

    You see, I am looking to upgrade from a pod system to an espresso machine, and I already have one of those Breville milk frother things with the spinning disc etc. Which seems to do an ample job of warming the milk (I just drink flat whites).

    So I'm wondering could I just make my espresso on my new machine and then do the milk in my Breville frother? Or would I be committing some heinous crime against coffee in doing so?

    Cheers !

  • #2
    Welcome to Coffee Snobs Skirch, if your Breville frother does the job go for it, very much a case of what ever suits your taste.

    On the other hand, if you visit a cafe for a cappuccino and find you prefer the way it is made, perhaps steamed milk will be more to your liking.

    Comment


    • #3
      Steamed milk is a little sweeter then just heated milk
      And of course texture

      Comment


      • #4
        steamed milk isnt about getting bubbles. the frothers tend to make a massive amount of medium to larger bubbles. A flat white shouldnt have this. this is where the steamed bit comes in. The air "bubbles' are not obvious, and this gives it texture
        .

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Skirch01 View Post
          Hi all.

          Just wondering... Is there something special about milk from a steam wand (for milk coffees of course!)?

          You see, I am looking to upgrade from a pod system to an espresso machine, and I already have one of those Breville milk frother things with the spinning disc etc. Which seems to do an ample job of warming the milk (I just drink flat whites).

          So I'm wondering could I just make my espresso on my new machine and then do the milk in my Breville frother? Or would I be committing some heinous crime against coffee in doing so?

          Cheers !
          G'day Skirch01

          The difference is not subtle. Mind you, I only use full cream cow milk (in glass bottles - I HATE the taste of plastic or wax), other milks / substitutes all tend to react differently.

          As you approach the scalding point of full cream milk using steam (usually about 72 - 74 degrees Celsius, depends upon breed of cow & season) you start breaking down the lipids, which adds about 3/4 teaspoon of "equivalent sugar sweetness" per 100ml of milk. Of course, that is when you nail it correctly: the further out your technique, the less difference it makes. Also, converting milk into microfoam (look it up in other froth and bubbles threads) gives it a light fluffy texture on the tongue - a difference which most regard as an improvement (I do).

          The combination of both extra sweetness and microfoam tends to reduce any residual bitterness in the cuppa - also a good thing if the roast (or "barista") is not that great. The issue: delaying either the coffee shot or the milk loses most of the gains. timing the two within 5 seconds is my unofficial benchmark for success.

          FYI, For years (way, way back) I used to microwave my milk at home and then use a coffee plunger to froth it (mind you, I was rarely home at the time anyway). One comparison ended that method in about 5 seconds - to the extreme of using two machines if my "main machine" could not shoot and froth at the same time.

          Enjoy your cuppa, moving from pods to coffee pretty well guarantees it.

          TampIt
          PS: The same technique may be used to make what friend's & family's kids call a "not chocolate" - mix cocoa / chocolate (your usual choice) in a little water (as little water as possible to make a paste), add whatever your normal amount of milk is and then froth the mixture with a steam wand. Result is a sort of "hot chocolate milkshake". Add whatever on top (marshmallows, dust of hot choc / whatever) if you want. Sometimes I add a drop of Rosewater to tinker the cocoa taste (old middle eastern trick I learnt a while back).

          Comment

          Working...
          X