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Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

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  • Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    Hi Guys

    Im interested in whether anyone here leverages a breadmaker to bake their own fresh bread?

    Im curious whether you can replicate the quality/texture/taste of your standard white loaf found at Brumbys/Bakers Delight.

    Im thinking about getting the wife a machine for Xmas

    Machines/recipes recommendations would be greatly appreciated I know nothing about bread - and can manage only a burnt camping damper.

  • #2
    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

    I know nothing about what a loaf of bread from Brumbys tastes like but I can tell you that you can produce outstanding bread in a breadmaker. I have been doing so since they first came on the market decades ago. Theres few things in life as good as a loaf of piping hot bread fresh from the pan. Whether that pan be a traditional bread pan from the oven or the pan from a bread machine. The type and quality of the bread is limited only by your quality control/attention to detail (Mainly the water/liquid temp.), imagination, and ingredients.

    One word of caution. Fresh bread still warm from the oven is extremely addictive! ;D ;D ;D


    Java "BMers of the world unite!" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

      Hi Matt,

      My family have been using the same bread maker for about 4 years and think the bread it makes tastes al least as good as fresh loaves from Brumbys and the like. For ease we use "Laucke" bread mix (can get it from supermarkets). Often I mix 50/50 white and wholemeal. Sometimes we make fruit loaf. Lots of recipes on the net and in the book that came with the machine. The machine is a basic model (Breville BBM100) and retails for $90 - $100. Bread works out considerably cheaper than bought stuff (forgotten how much - I did work it out once). You can put the ingredients in the machine the night before and set it up to be ready for breakfast the next morning if you like really fresh bread. Its a nice smell to start the day with, mixed with fresh coffee of course!!!

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      • #4
        Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

        Originally posted by 39273C353A3A3B3A540 link=1321835546/0#0 date=1321835546
        Im interested in whether anyone here leverages a breadmaker to bake their own fresh bread?
        are you kidding? I think Java must be lying... the only use for a breadmaker is roasting coffee isnt it? Im sure I saw a "free heat gun with bread-maker purchase" in woollies the other day

        OK seriously, I think you can liken it to coffee - franchise bakeries use pre-mix, which is a bit like supermarket beans. They have a small number of pre-mix bases which every loaf is made from. To get the different colours and shapes they just bake it differently.

        Find a bakery that makes it fresh using real things like flour, and youll probably find its quite popular. Friends of mine moved from a Brumbies franchise, to owning a local independant bakery using pre-mix, to making their own from scratch. It tastes better, if you ask me

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        • #5
          Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

          I went through a stage of making my own bread a few years ago. I think dollar for dollar it was no cheaper than basic supermarket bread, but definitely more economical than Brumbys etc, especially for specialty loaves.

          The skys the limit for quality and variety, you get out what you put in. The process is reasonably foolproof and allows for improvements and creativity.

          Having said that, its obviously not as convenient as buying bread. Its enjoyable and satisfying, but you need to want to do it.

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          • #6
            Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

            I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day (if there is any left). It is great for a french or continental loaf with a hearty home made soup on a cold winters night. My fruit loaf is great, but again doesnt stay fresh for more than a couple of days. I have found that wholemeal and multigrain mixes from the supermarket keep better (havent bothered doing them from scratch)

            Also great for donuts, hot cross bun dough, pizza dough, Chelsea bun, Corn bread etc. there are a heap of other recipes in the book to try.

            And as an added bonus you can turn it into a coffee roaster if you dont like it as a bread maker (just dont give the Missus a heat gun for Valentines day) ;D ;D ;D

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            • #7
              Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

              Good point coffee mum - just about every bakery puts preservatives in their bread. There are a couple (cant remember the exact names) that make kids in general go a bit nuts. Up here in the tropics, the bakeries will add more during the build-up to try and stop the mould, so if you have kids that are sensitive to those things you stay away from the bread!

              If you like watching the flavours, colours, and preservatives, thats another bonus to making your own bread.

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              • #8
                Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                Originally posted by 303C353536360C3E263E530 link=1321835546/5#5 date=1321848146
                I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day (if there is any left).
                Gday Coffee Mum...

                A small amount of Ascorbic Acid helps a bit in this regard, its often called Bread Enhancer, Bread Conditioner (and probably other things too) but it is just plain Vitamin C and can usually be bought in powdered form, from Home Bakers Supplies.

                We have gone off baking the bread in the BM itself though, much prefer the better all around results from the oven, so just use the BM for mixing, kneading and proofing.

                Have also moved away from single whole loaves of bread too. Have found it much more convenient to bake suitably sized bread-rolls and then pop them in the freezer after theyve cooled. A quick nuke in the microwave when needed is all that is required to enjoy beautiful, freshly baked bread when ever you want it.... Mmmm. 8-)

                Mal.

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                • #9
                  Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                  Hi Mal,

                  I do use bread improver, but still find a white loaf a bit dry next day, and as I said if there is any left (62" 19 year old usually sees to it that theres not ;D)

                  We dont eat much white bread these days, preferring wholemeal & multigrain and they keep quite well, but I do love it as a dough maker for all the other goodies that I shouldnt eat either

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                  • #10
                    Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                    Originally posted by 4B524343260 link=1321835546/4#4 date=1321845777
                    I think dollar for dollar it was no cheaper than basic supermarket bread, but definitely more economical than Brumbys etc, especially for specialty loaves.
                    If youre buying pre-made mixes the bread will comparable to store bought loaves. If you make your breads from scratch and buy the ingredients in larger quantities I think youll find its cheaper than even the basic supermarket breads. The same thing goes for specialty breads.

                    Originally posted by 4F474F484244260 link=1321835546/3#3 date=1321841797
                    Find a bakery that makes it fresh using real things like flour, and youll probably find its quite popular. Friends of mine moved from a Brumbies franchise, to owning a local independant bakery using pre-mix, to making their own from scratch. It tastes better, if you ask me
                    Far better tasting!

                    Originally posted by 4B524343260 link=1321835546/4#4 date=1321845777
                    Having said that, its obviously not as convenient as buying bread.
                    If you are set up for it making a loaf is a breeze. You simply toss everything into the pan, hit a button, and come back in 2 hours and 40 minutes or so depending on your maker/loaf to hot and fresh bread. It takes me all of literally 2 or 3 minutes to make most breads, longer if youre doing a specialty one that requires the chopping of nuts or some such. If you have all the ingredients buried in the back of a cupboard or in containers that you cant get your measuring cups into then it will take longer. But with everything ready to hand and in containers that you can measure direct from a basic white loaf should only take a couple of minutes to get going.

                    Originally posted by 454940404343794B534B260 link=1321835546/5#5 date=1321848146
                    I find the basic white loaf, made from scratch, good on the day but goes stale by the next day
                    Use bread flour or add gluten to the bread and it will last much longer. Bread flour (Called strong flour in the UK/Europe and perhaps in AUS as well.) will yield a loaf that is much softer, with a more elastic/less grainy feel, and has a longer shelf life. Also store the finished loaf, once its completely cooled down, in a ziplock or other plastic bag that you can seal/tie shut and do not put it in the fridge. Fresh bread will rarely last long enough for spoiling to be a worry.


                    If you find a loaf to be dried out and stale the next day then you need to change the recipe youre using and/or the setting(s) on the BM.

                    Making your own bread from scratch opens up a whole new world of reasonably priced wholesome breads with-out all the additives and preservatives found in virtually all store bought products. You can make a basic white loaf that will knock your socks off for taste as well as enjoying loaves such as an Onion & Rye bread or an Apple & Cheese bread or any of thousands of other recipes out there that will have your tastebuds crying out for more and make you wonder why youve been eating the cr@p from the store for all these years. Having a breadmachine makes it a breeze to do.



                    Java "Hiding his BM from all the Roasters" phile
                    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                      We use the bread-maker for making bread on a regular basis

                      My favourite bread is olive bread

                      We use both home blends & commercial preparations from the supermarket

                      KK

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                      • #12
                        Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                        Thanks for all the useful info guys.

                        A colleague mentioned that his standard $100 bread maker is LOUD... so loud that it wakes his 2 y/o kid up (whoms bedroom is near his kitchen). Hence he doesnt use the fresh morning bread feature thing too often.

                        Is the agitator/kneading noise loud enough to wake baby etc?

                        Panasonic have apparently just released some new model SD-2501. Is there much difference between the $250 machine and the $100 entry level machine?

                        Is panasonic the brand to get here in Aus?  I notice on Amazon in the US, the brand to get looks to be Zojirushi which Ive never heard of.

                        I prefer to spend a bit more and get a quality compliance that will last.

                        cheers

                        Matt.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                          Id suggest buying one from a 2nd hand store. Its where Ive bought mine and I see them all the time looking new for $15 or $20. Most of the features you find on the high end units are bells and whistles that arent really needed and IMO arent worth the extra $100. My previous BM I got from a 2nd hand store for I think it was $10. It was a no name generic one and I used it pretty much every day for about 15 years before it finally died on me. I replaced it with another virtually new looking $15 unit from a 2nd hand store and it has seen regular use with-out a burp for a year and a half and is still running flawlessly. As with just about any piece of equipment the more bells and whistles and electronics a machine has the sooner it will break. The basic machines will run until something physically breaks while the fancier ones with all the electronic bells and whistles will blow a board/circuit and stop functioning long before they physically wear out.


                          Java "Loves da bread!" phile
                          Toys! I must have new toys!!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                            Im snobbish when it comes to bread texture.

                            I use the the machine up to the stage when it "knocks " down the dough for its second rise. i take it out, roll out n stretch the dough, roll up n put into a bread baking tin. Let prove, then bake in normal oven.

                            The texture is better this way.

                            The South Australian Lauke bread mix is excellent, and has not failed so far.

                            Their crusty bread mix is great for making cheese n bacon bread.

                            Matt, get the breadmaker and get into bread making. You got nothing to lose.
                            When you tire of it, you can always convert it into a coffee roaster. 

                            Gary at G

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                            • #15
                              Re: Anyone make bread using a bread maker? Is it comparable to bakery?

                              Originally posted by 69656C6C6F6F55677F670A0 link=1321835546/8#8 date=1321851563
                              as I said if there is any left (62" 19 year old usually sees to it that theres not ;D)
                              Yep, been there, done that.... ;D

                              Our hungry hoards have flown the nest (for the time being anyway) :P

                              Mal.

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