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  • Mass hysteria and the media.

    The media (once again) have done an exemplary job of whipping the world population into a state of mass hysteria, as this article informs us, also known ironically as "epidemic hysteria" https://bigthink.com/mind-brain/mass...1#rebelltitem1

    Covid-19 has already made the Wikipedia "list of mass hysteria cases" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...hysteria_cases heaven help us if we ever face a real world crisis, its a case of dog eat dog now, I suspect one of the first things we would see is the introduction of ration books or similar, something we haven't seen since the Second World War, close behind would come martial law to control a panicking population.

    Once again the ABC news service was one of the worst offenders, this morning almost the entire page was devoted to doom and gloom Covid-19 stories.

    A short time ago PM Morrison said

    "this is not the zombie apocalypse that it would appear some people believe it to be.

    Morrison could not have been clearer in his message to the hoarders and doomsday preppers who are driving human behaviour in Australia to new levels of absurdity.

    “Stop it. It is ridiculous. And it is un-Australian,” the PM declared at his press conference in Canberra on Wednesday morning."


    To try to gain some sort of perspective, each year world wide 1.25 million people die in road accidents, no one bats an eye at this figure, simply a cost of going about our daily lives.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Yelta View Post
    To try to gain some sort of perspective, each year world wide 1.25 million people die in road accidents, no one bats an eye at this figure, simply a cost of going about our daily lives.
    We are constantly reviewing rules around road safety, there's constant advertising blitzes and law updates regarding seatbelts, headlights, dui, distracted driving and on and on. The modern vehicle has ABS, airbags, lane departure detection, pedestrian detection, crumple zones etc. I don't think these features have been introduced to save money and I think a lot of eyelids are batted around the clock, so much so that we don't notice it.

    I agree that the media has driven the hoarding mentality happening out there and at this time, nobody will be listening to the advice of an out of tune PM who is once again failing to show any leadership so I feel his breath is wasted telling people not to hoard, and would be better spent explaining what the government is doing (and not just what they want us to do). Everything they've talked about so far is about what we are banned from doing and how they're going to try and prop up the economy. Right now casual workers couldn't give a stuff about the economy, they're worrying about what will happen when the cafe they're at closes for a month and they can't pay rent. Full time workers are wondering if the company they work for will even exist after this is over, teachers are concerned that they're spending their days with hundreds of potential carriers that do not and probably can not really understand the implications of poor hygiene and Scotty is once again sitting on his hands.

    I sincerely hope that this all blows over and we come through the other side pretty much the same but I have my doubts. Thousands of doctors and healthcare workers are advocating for a total shutdown for 3-4 weeks to "flatten the curve" and there is currently no indication that this is going to happen. We have had months to prepare for this, a rapid response was required, but the gov are still playing it slow, while countries like China, Singapore and South Korea hit it early and hard and are showing signs of recovery.

    Sorry, I know this post is rather scattershot, but I am in an industry that is being crushed by this and I worry about our future so I've just sort of banged out a few thoughts on how I'm seeing. I think the economy is going take a massive hit no matter what (already is) so we should get cracking on getting the pain out of the way early so we can move onto recovery.

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess that's the problem, no one really gives a stuff about anyone else, very much a case of I'm alright Jack.

      "out of tune PM who is once again failing to show any leadership so I feel his breath is wasted telling people not to hoard, and would be better spent explaining what the government is doing (and not just what they want us to do). Everything they've talked about so far is about what we are banned from doing and how they're going to try and prop up the economy."
      How would you suggest we, as a nation tackle the problem? let me guess, more cash handouts! if we were not so busy living beyond our means perhaps we would be better placed to cope financially when these Crises come along.

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't have the answers, I am not an economist or a health professional or a politician. I really made that post to highlight that we do in fact bat eyelids at the road toll and got carried away with the train of thought. I don't think cash handouts should be on the cards but yeah, there needs to be a way to keep people home to a prevent the spread of the virus, and there will inevitably have to be a financial incentive to stay home, I unfortunately don't know what that looks like.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by magnafunk View Post
          I really made that post to highlight that we do in fact bat eyelids at the road toll and got carried away with the train of thought.
          Yep, understand what you say, I used the road toll as a single illustration, there are many other conditions that take millions of lives each year, interesting figures here from the WHO https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/the-top-10-causes-of-death

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          • #6
            This is a drama we will all see play out in real time before our eyes, with the claims of experts back and forth, all believing each is totally right.

            The closest relevant comparison I can think of is the 1919 Spanish Flu.

            The Spanish Flu wiped out about 50-100M at a time when experts knew little about viruses with more deaths than the slaughter of combatants in WW1.

            The options range from treating Covid19 as a very bad flu, i.e. business as usual, to shutting the country down as is currently being done. The effect of doing so on the entire population is more than I can imagine and I suspect the cure is worse than the problem. However 3% of 24M as my worst case death estimate is 720,000, so I am very reserved as to being critical of those at the coal face trying their best to provide solutions.

            As they say, prepare for the worst and hope for the best, appears appropriate at this stage.

            Comment


            • #7
              Yelta, there is a proportion of the population that do not need any help to whip themselves into a state of hysteria.
              The rest of the population (I'm beginning to think this proportion is not the majority) will absorb what information is available and make a rational assessment about what they need to do.
              The latter group will always be the ones who miss out on the baked beans, pasta and toilet paper as they are not disposed to panic-buy and will only think about it after the shelves are empty.
              The "media hysteria" has in the main, been the product of a Nation totally unprepared for an epidemic (let alone a pandemic) and a government that is making it up as they go along, unfortunately with a substantial time-lag.
              Hopefully this experience may result in the development of comprehensive plans by governments at all levels (hopefully also coordinated) and the acquisition of the appropriate medical supplies and infrastructure to cope with the next one which will inevitably occur.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Rocky View Post
                Yelta, there is a proportion of the population that do not need any help to whip themselves into a state of hysteria.
                The rest of the population (I'm beginning to think this proportion is not the majority) will absorb what information is available and make a rational assessment about what they need to do.
                The latter group will always be the ones who miss out on the baked beans, pasta and toilet paper as they are not disposed to panic-buy and will only think about it after the shelves are empty.
                G'Day Rocky, some may well miss out, others, and I include my family in this category maintain a well stocked pantry as well as a freezer full of cooked meals and other perishables, I suspect this habit comes from growing up during the post war era when food and other consumables were in very short supply.

                I read a comment from a woman who lives on a station the other day re panic buying, she couldn't comprehend the panic buying mentality, her thoughts were along the lines of, doesn't everyone maintain a backup supply, just in case.

                I note in the US one of the hot ticket items for the "panicked" was frozen pizza, wonder how many in this day and age know how to cook.

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                • #9
                  Stories I've heard today is a shortage of ventolin caused by people buying up stock in the belief that it will ease COVID-19 symptoms and this tweet from a doctor:

                  I live in a small town of 1500 people 100 kms from Melbourne. Yesterday 4 tour buses arrived from Melbourne and 200 people descended on our supermarket and stripped the shelves of everything. Not. One. Foodstuff. Left

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                  • #10
                    I grew up in the 50's and 60's and there was no shortage of consumables in Regional Queensland. Never acquired a habit of stockpiling groceries although we would normally have at least one replacement for most items - i.e. pack of 8 toilet rolls, 2 kilo rice, couple bags pasta, 2 kilo sugar, 2 kilo flour, and a couple of extras of anything we use regularly - but NOT dozens!
                    Country folk (Station/Farm people are a special case as you need to buy in bulk on your trips into the city and would generally maintain a bit of a buffer) I'm surprised a Country person would expect city people to maintain a significant backup supply - just in case. Country people are usually very common-sense in my experience.
                    The last thing most people want is a heap of stuff that they have no room for, stacked in every available corner. Also a lot of people simply cannot afford to hoard a supply of items.
                    Panic buying of excessive supplies creates shortages (and problems) that would not otherwise exist and we go from a situation of everyone having enough to some people having more than they can use and others not having any. There is absolutely no justification for panic buying and hoarding and supermarkets/stores should be required by law to ration items the moment this begins.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                      I guess that's the problem, no one really gives a stuff about anyone else, very much a case of I'm alright Jack.

                      "out of tune PM who is once again failing to show any leadership so I feel his breath is wasted telling people not to hoard, and would be better spent explaining what the government is doing (and not just what they want us to do). Everything they've talked about so far is about what we are banned from doing and how they're going to try and prop up the economy."
                      How would you suggest we, as a nation tackle the problem? let me guess, more cash handouts! if we were not so busy living beyond our means perhaps we would be better placed to cope financially when these Crises come along.
                      The Mooch was suggesting 4.2 trillion dollars was necessary for the USA to tackle the fallout from the virus as well as costs associated with the virus itself.

                      https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/18/p...nge/index.html

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wattgn View Post
                        The Mooch was suggesting 4.2 trillion dollars was necessary for the USA to tackle the fallout from the virus as well as costs associated with the virus itself.

                        https://edition.cnn.com/2020/03/18/p...nge/index.html
                        Quoting CNN is part of the problem.
                        Also, TDS is more prevalent with certain sections of the media and population.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bosco_Lever View Post
                          Quoting CNN is part of the problem.
                          Also, TDS is more prevalent with certain sections of the media and population.
                          TDS? three times a day, total dissolved solids???

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                            TDS? three times a day, total dissolved solids???
                            "Trump Derangement Syndrome". Not to be confused with BDS or ODS.
                            Regards
                            OCD.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by OCD View Post
                              "Trump Derangement Syndrome". Not to be confused with BDS or ODS.
                              Regards
                              OCD.
                              New one on me, quite apt.

                              Comment

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