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I survived the AstraZenica vaccine.

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  • #61
    A few comments come to mind:
    If vaccinated you have all the protection currently available, so what has it got to do with the unvaccinated;
    Booster shots are probably required every 6 months, not much different to 12 monthly flu shots;
    In my town of 30k one hospital, we have had two adults get permanent heart damage following vaccination, one a marathon runner, they were treated by the local respiratory specialist but I don't know if we still have that specialist as he refused the vaccines and was probably stood down by Queensland Health last week. The Courier Mail reported on a Rockhampton man also with permanent heart damage from vaccination, over 40 days in hospital, so that's three that the after effects were not minor. I thought you would know about that one Rocky.

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    • #62
      Sorry but Mark Briggs has not had the reasons for his heart/kidney failure diagnosed.
      One Brisbane based anti-Vax specialist has opined that it may have been caused by the vaccination but the doctors treating him have not.
      Lots of people who run marathons have heart attacks.
      The idea behind vaccination is to protect the majority not save everyone.

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      • #63
        The smallpox vaccination caused fatalities at about one per million and dangerous reactions at more like several per 100,000 and now smallpox has been eradicated. This means 25 deaths and 250 serious reactions and possible disability over the period of the last year or two with COVID vaccinations. Who knows too the rates may have been even higher. The MMR vaccines save thousands of lives every year versus very low rates of complications.

        It is tragic if you are one of the people hit by these very low probability events but looking at NSW in particular, the high rates of vaccination have brought the death rates right down and even the case numbers.

        Vaccines are what give us long life and good health...the case of prevention being much better than dealing with the consequences of getting sick.

        I guess older people like me still remember people being crippled by Polio and killed by Diphtheria and even Measles (1-3 fatalities per 1000 cases).

        The other issue with vaccines is the amazingly low cost compared with treating the disease. This is critically important for third world countries where often there isn't medical treatment available at all if you get sick.

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        • #64
          Anti-vaxers and "vaccination-recalcitrants" love to quote cases where "vaccination was the cause of other negative medical outcomes" . These cases almost always turn out to be unproven.
          Having "all the protection currently available" regrettably does not prevent one from still getting Covid, and dying from/having a severe legacy from the disease if you are in a vulnerable group. Having everybody vaccinated would go a long way to preventing contact with unvaccinated carriers who are clearly more likely to be a threat than vaccinated people.
          Society will unfortunately always have a proportion of irresponsible people who care little for the welfare of others and determinedly swim against the current of common sense and scientific opinion.

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          • #65
            I spoke too soon when I said I had no side effects from the Pfizer booster. A few days later I’d dropped a kilo just from doing number twos.

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            • #66
              Originally posted by pamount View Post
              I spoke too soon when I said I had no side effects from the Pfizer booster. A few days later I’d dropped a kilo just from doing number twos.
              I guess getting the vaccination is Number One, the Number Twos are of secondary importance. S--- happens I guess. I know of a few reactions to the Pfizer, it does happen.

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              • #67
                It's pretty clear that reactions to the vaccinations, first, second and booster, from the various brands, is as varied as people themselves.
                Which, when you think about it, is what you'd expect. Individual subseptibility (in a medical context) is all that really means anything.
                What will produce a serious negative result in one person may not affect another - think smoking, alcohol, drug use, diet etc.
                When I was a rehab. counsellor I used to say to clients "While it's good to know what works for others, the important thing is to find out what works for you".
                My Mother never worked, did no exercise, and had high cholesterol all her life and was fully mobile and had all her marbles until she died at 103. Doesn't mean that I will be the same.

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                • #68
                  100% to the posts above. My third is not until next March and I’m not sure that I’ll be even able to request what goes in my arm and ultimately I’m not stressed but if I can I will request the much maligned AZ vax. Two does previous and no more than a sore arm from the first, zero issues with the second. Yep it seemed to work for me😊

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                  • #69
                    Better half and I have both had 2 x shots of the AZ vaccine without issue, not so much as a sore arm.🙂

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                    • #70
                      I might enquire about the AZ as my booster shot. It may be that this gives better long term protection than Pfizer and I know I don't react to it either.

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                      • #71
                        I've recently had a Pfizer booster .

                        Unfortunately, it may not be over (fingers crossed)

                        https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-03552-w

                        Reported 25 November 2021

                        Researchers in South Africa are racing to track the concerning rise of a new variant of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The variant harbours a large number of mutations found in other variants, including Delta, and it seems to be spreading quickly across South Africa.

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