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Which Sunbeam to buy?

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  • Which Sunbeam to buy?

    Hi all

    A friend of mine wants to buy a coffee machine for his mum for Mother's Day.

    I've talked him through all the different machine types, budgets, coffee preferences, user preferences, etc and where we've ended up is that I've recommended a cafe series or equivalent machine and a smart grinder or equivalent.

    But my problem is that I don't know the sunbeam range at all, it's been so long since I've had one.

    Is there a standout machine in the $300 range? Because it's a gift for his mum it's got to be new.

    Thanks
    Jonathon

  • #2
    Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
    Hi all

    A friend of mine wants to buy a coffee machine for his mum for Mother's Day.

    I've talked him through all the different machine types, budgets, coffee preferences, user preferences, etc and where we've ended up is that I've recommended a cafe series or equivalent machine and a smart grinder or equivalent.

    But my problem is that I don't know the sunbeam range at all, it's been so long since I've had one.

    Is there a standout machine in the $300 range? Because it's a gift for his mum it's got to be new.

    Thanks
    Jonathon
    A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).
    What is his budget all up?
    I doubt that he will want to shell out $200+ for a half decent grinder and then another 3 or 4 hundred on an appliance.
    And given your question about the $300 range, I'm equally sure he ain't gonna plump for the EM7000

    If it goes anything like the conversations I have with people when they ask what they should get, they listen intently to my advice, then go and buy a pod machine, then try to tell me how good it is after they have bought it. I call these people "Somebody that I used to know".

    I'm sure his Mum will love the pod machine that he ends up buying.

    Brett.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by fatboy_1999 View Post
      A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).
      What is his budget all up?
      I doubt that he will want to shell out $200+ for a half decent grinder and then another 3 or 4 hundred on an appliance.
      And given your question about the $300 range, I'm equally sure he ain't gonna plump for the EM7000

      If it goes anything like the conversations I have with people when they ask what they should get, they listen intently to my advice, then go and buy a pod machine, then try to tell me how good it is after they have bought it. I call these people "Somebody that I used to know".

      I'm sure his Mum will love the pod machine that he ends up buying.

      Brett.

      +1

      anyone who buys that stale ground coffee in an aluminium pod and believes it tastes good needs to be sent to the fires of Mordor.

      If your friend lives anywhere near Botany, then he can go to the sunbeam factory outlet and get a runout 6910 or a remanufactured em7K for about 300 less than RRP.

      but you have to be in the right place at the right time. they are not always in stock.

      best bit about the refurbed / remanufactured, is that they do it here in Oz and the machines are better than ex-china. and they have warranty as well.

      I bought brand new old stock 6910's for my sister and parents for xmas and paid half RRP. The em7K is a facelifted 6910 with shiny buttons and an extra temperature gauge for the steam wand, which is really just a wank.

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      • #4
        He definitely doesn't want pod, apparently his mum is very keen to get a grinder, good on her!

        I've talked him up to a budget of about $700, so I'm now going to suggest a Silvia for $500 and a smart grinder for whatever they cost, about $200ish I think.

        I just need to talk him into upping his budget to $900, then he can get a Compak K3 to go with the Silvia!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by fatboy_1999 View Post
          A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).

          .
          Sorry, I was using the term 'cafe series' as a generic term to refer to the thermoblock machines they sell at Myer, DJs, etc. Not having looked at them in years I had no idea what their names and numbers are.

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          • #6
            On the EM7000, Sunbeam are throwing in an EM0480 for free. But it's well above the budget.

            An Aeropress, a low end electric burr grinder and periodically supplying fresh roasted beans is a much better present for that budget. I got approximately that for my 70yo parents, and they use them daily.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lobstermash View Post
              On the EM7000, Sunbeam are throwing in an EM0480 for free. But it's well above the budget.

              An Aeropress, a low end electric burr grinder and periodically supplying fresh roasted beans is a much better present for that budget. I got approximately that for my 70yo parents, and they use them daily.
              Excellent suggestion.

              Aeropress and a breville smart grinder or even a K3 would be fantastic, unless they are determined to have frothy milk drinks

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeB View Post
                Excellent suggestion.

                Aeropress and a breville smart grinder or even a K3 would be fantastic, unless they are determined to have frothy milk drinks
                K3 for an aeropress? I've just bought a K3 for my giotto at home (already have a rocky) but I use a cheap breville grinder for my aeropress at work and it's perfectly adequate for the aeropress.

                In any case, my friend's mum wants lattes.

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                • #9
                  If the budget's been increased, there are still lots of places you can get an EM6910 for around $600 new. Likewise for a Silvia. Or the EM7000 with a free EM0480 for around $750 (David Jones)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one. Giving one as a gift to an amateur is just going to add another item to eBay. Like giving a puppy, you want to make sure you aren't just handing over something that will be neglected because they never learn to look after it.

                    The good thing about a 6910 (or 7000) is it is push-button simple to use. Cleaning is simple too, and all machines need to be clean so maybe once he buys and gifts you can go around and run a class on making coffee, foaming milk and cleaning routines?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by lobstermash View Post
                      If the budget's been increased, there are still lots of places you can get an EM6910 for around $600 new. Likewise for a Silvia. Or the EM7000 with a free EM0480 for around $750 (David Jones)
                      Silvia is $499 new.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Journeyman View Post
                        I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one. Giving one as a gift to an amateur is just going to add another item to eBay. Like giving a puppy, you want to make sure you aren't just handing over something that will be neglected because they never learn to look after it.
                        Yes I thoroughly agree. In the email I sent to my friend I wrote about 4 paragraphs explaining that while the Silvia is arguably the cheapest machine that replicates cafe quality lattes, there's a steep learning curve.

                        In any event, I suspect it's one of those Mother's Day presents that's really for the children. He told me his sister, who still lives at home, is a budding hipster barista, so the Silvia should be perfect.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Journeyman View Post
                          I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one.
                          Morning Journyman, this statement is wrong, there is nothing difficult about the Silvia, if you you are not making good coffee on a Silvia within a few days of buying it I would suggest your a slow learner.

                          I would be very cautious about judging machines based on comments you have read online, there's lots of misinformation posted by those with vested interests.

                          There's a good reason why the Rancillio Silvia has been one of the most successful home espresso machines (worldwide) over the past 15 years "it has become the standard against which all other consumer, single boiler machines are measured, currently in its 3rd revision."

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                          • #14
                            I'm wondering how many posters in this thread who are suggesting Silvia is difficult to use actually own one? this really is misinformation.

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                            • #15
                              All the same basics re: the right grind fineness, filter basket filling and tamping etc apply to any machine. The main difference with the Silvia compared to the cheaper Sunbeam and Breville thermoblock/thermocoil machines is that the Silvia is a single boiler machine. People just need to understand the concept of priming (keeping water level up in the boiler), to avoid issues with the heating element, especially before steaming. This would apply to all boiler machines and is not a difficult concept to master.

                              The foolproof way of avoiding issues is to get into a routine.

                              1./ Check there is water in the reservoir before switching the Silvia on.
                              2./ As soon as you switch on run water through the Steam wand using the Hot water button until there is a steady stream of water (about 1/2 cup or more) to be sure the boiler is full
                              3./ If you Brew before steaming you may want to repeat 2./ before steaming depending on how many cups you've brewed and how much milk you intend to Steam. I usually prime again prior to Steaming just as a precaution.
                              4./ After steaming I repeat 2./ to refill the boiler.

                              As far as I know following these steps will keep the Silvia's heating element in good shape and avoid an early demise due to overheating it through lack of water in the boiler.

                              The big advantages of the Silvia compared to most Themoblock/Thermocoil machines is that the Silvia allows you to play with temperture via temp surfing or PIDing and pressure via the OPV adjustment. Both of these play a big role in the quality of the brew.
                              Last edited by CafeLotta; 7 May 2013, 12:30 PM.

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