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  • Espresso machine

    I drink drip coffee, the closer to a Mr. Coffee full of Hills Bros I can get, the better I like it.
    My spouse much prefers a latte, especially if the foam is "velvety".
    She wants to buy a machine.
    Any suggestions? Comments?

  • #2
    All responses will be semi useless unless you can help and let up know a better idea of full budget (remember well talk Aust dollars in case you didn’t know, seen you in LA) you have for machine, grinder, water filtration, acessories.
    got $15k or more: I’d get a rocket R9 one or slayer one group with a Ek43 grinder
    got $500: get a second hand appliance type machine (breville or Sunbeam) and a secondhand grinder like an Macap M2, Eureka Atom, Compak K3

    got a machine with a boiler or worth any reasonable sum of money, get a water filter to reduce scale.
    dont get drawn to a shine espresso machine like a moth to the light, spend enough money on a useful grinder or you wonder why pretty $2k shine box pumps put crap coffee. I’d say $400+ for new grinder and you’ll be doing really good

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    • #3
      Like MB21 says, you need to give more information and you should probably ask on an american forum, where people will actually be able to point you to a machine available from somewhere near you and, importantly, on your voltage, which is half of ours.

      It would also be handy to know who is going to drink what and how into it they are.

      If you're saying you drink drip and you're not going to use the machine, then that simplifies things. If you're saying you want to drink americanos, also good to know. If the machine is only going to make milk based coffees and your wife isn't that fussed about the coffee itself, then, for example, you probably reach diminishing returns on spending more on grinders after spending less money than if you want to drink black coffee with light roasts, for example.

      Then there's the question of how much work you want to do vs how long you expect the machine to last vs how good you expect the coffee quality to be. For example, if your wife is going to make the coffee for herself and she is going to be frustrated by details like adjusting the grind and making sure she doses consistently, then maybe you need a superautomatic machine that is as close to tap a button as possible. These are mechanically complex and typically the sorts of people who buy them don't diligently maintain them, so you shouldn't expect them to last long (regardless of price) and the quality that you can expect is probably lower than you will get with other options.

      If you want minimum hassle, you should probably find a local roastery that makes coffee that you are happy to have as your regular coffee and find out what they recommend.

      Regardless, whatever you do, you should look into your water quality before you buy anything and work out if that is going to cause problems for whatever you buy, since I know some areas in the USA have water with lots of calcium that can deposit in your machine. If you have an old electric kettle that you use a lot and you've got white calcium carbonate deposits near the heating element, that's a dead giveaway that you could have problems.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Mb21 View Post
        All responses will be semi useless unless you can help and let up know a better idea of full budget (remember well talk Aust dollars in case you didn’t know, seen you in LA) you have for machine, grinder, water filtration, acessories.
        got $15k or more: I’d get a rocket R9 one or slayer one group with a Ek43 grinder
        got $500: get a second hand appliance type machine (breville or Sunbeam) and a secondhand grinder like an Macap M2, Eureka Atom, Compak K3

        got a machine with a boiler or worth any reasonable sum of money, get a water filter to reduce scale.
        dont get drawn to a shine espresso machine like a moth to the light, spend enough money on a useful grinder or you wonder why pretty $2k shine box pumps put crap coffee. I’d say $400+ for new grinder and you’ll be doing really good
        Great advice! Important to get a good grinder with new blades. We always recommend that whatever equipment you buy make sure that there is a service agent nearby so that if you have any problems you are not without coffee - no-one wants that issue. Espresso coffee really comes down to how much effort you want to put into it. Perhaps your partner might prefer an auto machine like a Jura or Delonghi for a quick no fuss cuppa. Coffee is so personal.

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