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  • Carimali rebuild

    Hi gang,

    Im not too comfortable fitting this in the "extreme" category...it sounds too much like a boast. However, it fits the definition closer than any of the other categories, so here goes.

    This the gutted chassis of single group Carimali that I recently came into ownership of. This is prior to cleaning.


    It was in reasonably tidy external appearance when I picked it up, although I dont like the maroon colour, or the "checkerbox" screen printing on the front panel. I may re-do the paint; Im toying with the idea of a metallic "ice" blue....whaddya reckon??




    Cleaning the front panel took care of the screen printing, as it came off anyway, luckily the logo on the rear was made of sterner stuff.

    I steam cleaned the bare chassis this afternoon and have started to re-assemble the electricals. There had been lots of cockys living in the control box...yuk!


    Most of the filth is shop grease mixed with coffee grounds. It looked disgusting, but, like an oily engine, cleaned up fairly easily. Heres some "before" shots.....








    I have the boiler in a copper(!), soaking in CLR. I could probably get away without descaling as it isnt all that bad. Build date was 1997, and it looks to have had relatively little use; not much cleaning either. Ive already cleaned all fittings. Ill replace all seals and gaskets as I re-assemble.

    If other members are interested, I will give updates as I progress. Paintwork not-withstanding, I hope to have it up and running within the next week or so.

    Regards,
    Phil

  • #2
    Re: Carimali rebuild

    Phil,

    Looking good, and yes please updates along the way!!!

    Love to see a project taking shape. ;D ;D ;D ;D

    Just a word of warning (unfortunately too late for you but might help others)

    Please, please dont use CLR to clean coffee equipment. Its not food safe so will need LOTS of washing to clean it away - but the really bad news is that it leaves a "taint" which will affect the brews and that is very, very hard to remove. :-/

    Just use citric acid (cheap, effective and totally safe to use and food safe as well). If you want to use what the "big boys" use then its diluted hydrochloric acid - but no need as citric acid works perfectly.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Carimali rebuild


      Hi Phil,

      What a great looking machine. I reckon thats about as extreme as you need for home use. I look forward to seeing it progress and hearing about the first shots.

      I sort of agree with JB wrto CLR, but I have used it and managed to clear it out of the system. It will probably take a bit more rinsing. CLR is much more effecting near room temp, while citric acid like really hot water to be effective.

      Good luck and keep us posted.

      Cheers,

      Mark.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Carimali rebuild

        Hi Phil - please dont change the colour...I think its beautiful as is!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Carimali rebuild

          Gday Phil

          Looks like a really nice machine, well designed and well built. The ideal home project machine..... And like JB says, we like to have lots of progress reports and photos, its always interesting to see what other CS-ers are getting up to with their "extreme" machines ;D

          Mal.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Carimali rebuild

            Thanks guys,

            It is a neat little machine, isnt it? The boiler is 3.5L and the element 1600W, which are easy to live with in a domestic situation. My current machine is a semi automatic Bo-Ema which makes a great espresso, but has a 7L boiler with a 2400W element. The Carimali would have to be a third smaller, which isnt a huge deal but it would be nice to reclaim some bench space. The proof of the pudding will be in the eating, and Ill decide which to keep when I do side by side comparisons.

            Im going to lag the boiler with some temporary insulation and make a template at that time so that if I manage to get some of the silicon foam insulation, it will make it that much easier to do. There are no other tweaks planned at this point, but well see. I wont know whether the volumetric dosing works until I fire it all up....I dont really care if it doesnt!

            Hmm, descaling! This is my third go at a rebuild/restoration, and Ive been developing a bit of a regime depending on how bad the scale and external dirt is. I start by washing the parts in Nifti to clean external dirt and grease. Next up, descaling. Its funny, the three machines have come from Qld, NSW and Vic respectively, and the scale type has been quite different in each case. This one (from Sydney) seems to be more brownish, and a bit "softer". The Qld machine, which was in a parlous state, was very much like dark concrete.

            Anyway, I use citric or tartaric acids for mild descaling, and, as Mark mentioned, at an elevated temperature. I think its handy if the machine isnt going to be stripped down as its fairly easily flushed out. I didnt use it in this case, as I planned to strip the machine completely.

            I agree that CLR can be a pain in the neck, but Im fairly happy that the steps I now take remove it prior to use. I think the odour/taste of CLR lingers in the scale itself, so its critical to completely remove all scale. This can be problematic with small, enclosed areas such as pipes, HXs etc. All parts that will fit end up in my ultrasonic cleaner until Im satisfied its perfectly clean.


            Once thats done, I flush them til they seem to be clean, then they get a soak in Sodium Bicarbonate, which seems to remove any lingering CLR odour in IME. The boilers a little more problematic; it invloves removing, rinsing, and shaking to dislodge the scale until theres no more visible, then doing the bicarb soak. As you mention JavaB, the CLR can ruin a fortnights worth of coffee.

            I used Hydrochloric acid on the Bo-Ema, the scale in that boiler boggled the mind! Thank goodness it had a removable end plate! It was a quarter of an inch thick in some places; I was also using a small cold chisel (carefully!) and a wire brush. I may end up using HCl on this one if the CLR doesnt seem to be getting there after a few days.

            If/when I do all this again on yet another machine, Ill do it all with dilute HCl to compare.

            Now, how does this all go back together again.......??!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Carimali rebuild

              Hi Phil, you clearly know what youre doing. I love the ultrasonic bath. Ive been looking at that auction place with one of those in mind...

              I notice a lot of beans and a few bunnies as well. I hope theyre not going in the machine.

              Keep us posted so we can all enjoy the ride. Hopefully if we get enough restoration projects here, this forum may become a useful souce of info for first time restorers.

              Cheers,

              Mark.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Carimali rebuild

                Phil,

                Yep, that ultrasonic bath is to "die for"..... you have a great setup.

                If you want even more scale in the boiler- try a refurb on a machine ex Perth which hasnt been used with a water softener..... we have about 125mg hardness in the city with almost 3 times that in some country areas.

                Good luck with your current project.... looking forward to pictures of the final result.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Carimali rebuild

                  Originally posted by Sparky link=1175840909/0#6 date=1175904104
                  Hi Phil, you clearly know what youre doing
                  As if!! Lets just say Im happy to learn by my mistakes!

                  The UC came from the well known auction site. As it happens, I bought it from the U.S.; interestingly it belonged to the USNs Nuclear Medicine Dept at Pearl Harbour! It was relatively cheap, couple of hundred or so from memory. My other obsession is hi-fi and music which is why I initially bought it; I also use the UC to clean lps! Its handy for a multitude of purposes...money well spent. It has a 5L capacity, which makes it a much more useful size than the wee jewellery cleaners available.

                  I agree that this site is a good resource for amateur restorers. I am a bit of a lurker on forums and chat rooms, but after swapping a few emails and PMs back and forth, figured the project and discussions may be of use to others down the track.

                  JavaB, your advice has been niggling at me! Ive taken the boiler out of the CLR, and made up a large brew of what would be about 5%v/v HCl and plonked the boiler in. Ill keep an eye on it and rotate it this afternoon and see how it goes. It is clearly more agressive than the CLR; I wish the brilliant pristine copper could stay that way!

                  Regards,
                  Phil

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Carimali rebuild

                    Thats quite a project, Phil. Your approach is very methodical. The machine looks to be of industrial strength and in great shape.

                    Yep, pity copper tarnishes -- but then, that protective layer is the very reason why it doesnt "rust" like steel.

                    Good luck flushing and reassembling.

                    From your pics the steam and hot water taps appear to be electrically operated. Is that right? How do you control volume?

                    -Robusto

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Carimali rebuild

                      Originally posted by robusto link=1175840909/0#9 date=1175995290
                      From your pics the steam and hot water taps appear to be electrically operated. Is that right? How do you control volume?
                      Hi Robusto,

                      The valves are standard arrangement, but they use a "cam"-like lever arrangement instead of threaded taps. Its not exactly my preference, but I dare say Ill get used to it. I rarely use steam in any case.

                      Heres a couple more pics of the boiler soon after removal from the HCl bath. This only took an hour or so. The boiler had been in CLR, and wasnt badly scaled up in the first place, but I was impressed with the job the HCl did.


                      Sorry for the out of focus photo, this is the inside of the boiler as seen through the element hole; the HX tube is in the lower half of the frame. It looks like an endoscope shot!


                      Regards,
                      Phil

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Carimali rebuild

                        ahhhh its a thing of beauty

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Carimali rebuild

                          Originally posted by phil jeffery link=1175840909/0#10 date=1176151109

                          Heres a couple more pics of the boiler soon after removal from the HCl bath. This only took an hour or so. The boiler had been in CLR, and wasnt badly scaled up in the first place, but I was impressed with the job the HCl did.
                          Regards,
                          Phil
                          Looks good there Phil. You can understand why the pros use HCl.... just so much quicker (but caution is needed in handling the stuff....)

                          Its a pity the boiler (and cleaned copper piping etc ) doesnt stay the lovely rosy pink clean copper colour. It will look really impressive "under the bonnet".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Carimali rebuild

                            I know what Im doing tomorrow now; a package just arrived from Coffee Parts! Id tackle some re-assembling this afternoon, but I just finished nightshift this morning, and Ive learnt after decades of working shiftwork not to tackle anything requiring thought and an even temper after graveyard. Thats O.K., I can count copper pipes to help me sleep on it...........


                            Scratch a stay, Ill have it up and running tomorrow or Sunday. I promise to take plenty of assembly photos,
                            Phil

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Carimali rebuild

                              Good one Phil

                              Mal.

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