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Desirability of Gaggia GX Visacrem Lever Espresso Machine

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  • Desirability of Gaggia GX Visacrem Lever Espresso Machine

    Can you help me understand the market?

    I'm selling a two group lever machine. It is a Gaggia GX Visacrem 2 group lever machine that is in pristine condition, with spare parts that I bought just in case a service is needed. There is also a naked portafilter that I had made from an original one and then chromed to match. It is a amazing machine, certainly far better in results than the Rocket Espresso Giotto Evoluzione V2 that I have in my very small kitchen.

    I priced it very reasonably, and then reduced it before Christmas to what I thought might be a super reasonable price. Considering that it is of moderate size and can also run on gas I thought it would be quite desirable, a great machine for home (if you have the space which I no longer do) or to being used in a cafe or for a coffee cart. Yes it is heavy but courier transport is not expensive these days. So I wonder why I have not sold it in the weeks since listing it for sale? I admit that I am not in the business of selling stuff so may have poorly described/marketed it.

    What do you think?

  • #2
    I think the biggest barrier is going to be your limited market. Levers have a strong but smaller following. 2 group machines are notoriously hard to move. It's also an older machine (though in excellent condition), which may limit the number of buyers. The fact that it is an older lever machine that doesn't need work done may reduce the numbers of buyers as most of the ones I see getting bought and sold are project machines that need some TLC. It's also Christmas, so less people are going to have time to look for machines, and usually less disposable income. The other thing that confused me when I originally saw the ad was the coffee cart in the title, it made me think it was already on a cart but no cart in the photos.

    All in all I think you just need to wait for the right buyer to come along, which will take time given the limited market the machine will appeal to. Gorgeous machine, GLWS

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    • #3
      Agree with everything level3ninja says.

      You might look to advertise on other websites (would have to remove this ad) with more sets of eyes to have a better chance of selling it, as someone running off-grid or a putting together a coffee cart/van may be keen on this machine or for home use a coffee nerd who is not on CoffeeSnobs.

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      • #4
        Yes, Level3ninja makes good points. Reading the for sale ad, I find the backstory interesting...a good read.

        However, just one very short paragraph is devoted to extolling the virtues of the machine to prospective buyers.

        I don't know how many times I have told internet sellers: details, details, details. Buyers can't see or feel the item for sale, so you must offer as many details as possible. Anticipate what questions they might have, and answer them in the ad.

        In any case, having looked at the pictures, understanding the emotional attachment, and the house move...were it me I would definitely keep the lovely machine.

        Surely a little extra space can be found in the new home.

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        • #5
          Thanks for taking the time to respond. Much appreciated. I'll add some more details and we'll see. Yes, it is a gorgeous machine!

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          • #6
            I had the same machine, fully reconditioned and admittedly not in as nice condition but I had the panels re-powdercoated and replaced the red handles with rare as rare NOS. I could only get $1500. They're a big machine for increasingly shrinking kitchens. And budgets.

            I'm convinced old commercial levers are dead in the water, unless super rare one group early Italian Gaggias.

            Depressing ain't it.
            Last edited by JMcCee; 12 January 2020, 06:21 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JMcCee View Post
              I had the same machine, fully reconditioned and admittedly not in as nice condition but I had the panels re-powdercoated and replaced the red handles with rare as rare NOS. I could only get $1500. They're a big machine for increasingly shrinking kitchens. And budgets.

              I'm convinced old commercial levers are dead in the water, unless super rare one group early Italian Gaggias.

              Depressing ain't it.
              It's a strange world. All it would take is for a 2 group like this to be in some cool TV series and the world would be searched by lots of people who want to imitate what they have seen. But I'm sure there are people who appreciate things for their perfection, beyond fashion and 'influencers'. That makes me want to find a way to preserve this one because let's face it another 2,5 or 10 years and the rarity of a perfect machine like this would probably create its own market. At one time a worn Buggati was pushed into a lake and years later the then legendary Lake Maggiore 1925 Bugatti Type 22 Brescia fetched EUR 260,500! Should I sink this Gaggia in Lake Daylesford? (only joking...) So one option is to do what robusto suggests and keep it in my workshop for when friends come. Maybe start a Victorian Goldfields RFFer morning coffee preceded by a road cycling session?

              Another option is to convert it into a single group. That would be cool and fit into my cottage. I actually had a close look. The frame, boiler and rear panel are easy to shorten, the front panel probably needs replacing and the fittings placed either side of the group lever, the tray and surrounds on top and below the group could be shortened and TIG welded then ground back and polished so everything fits, the gas burner could also be modified, and the element could probably curved on itself and bent down so the minimum water level stays the same. There would be one beautiful group left overt that may (or maybe not??) is something I could sell.

              What do you think, has this kind of conversion been done before?

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              • #8
                Sounds like a lot of work, which would detract from the desirability of the machine.

                I think its attraction is its uniqueness, its inherent features, the original condition.

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