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  • Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

    Have been thinking about a longish trip away for long service leave, and noticed occasional mention of the Belman stove top coffee maker as suitable if you want to brew and steam milk.
    Have read the post on the Atomic styled units, which are much dearer than the Belman.
    Is there anyone out there who can explain the relative ability/capability of the Belman, and indeed a bit of a how to similar to the post about the Atomic units?

    Thanks in advance.
    Bullitt

  • #2
    Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

    I have not used one
    Sorrentina sells them
    Personaly I would ring them for a chat or if you live close to them go and have a demo

    Info on the top of the line bellman
    http://sorrentinacoffee.myshopify.com/products/bellman-stainless-stove-top-coffee-maker-cx25p

    KK

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    • #3
      Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

      Yes- I have been stocking the Bellmans for a few years now. I used to use one every day. For a stove top machine they are quite versatile- there is a reducer in the basket that allows three different amounts of coffee to be used. The milk frother is quite powerful when you get the hang of it. Also the machine is solidly made and will last for years.

      The coffee brew can be very good- The manufacturer made a macchiato with the Bellman for me once- he roasted and ground his own beans- ground fairly fine- tamped carefully- started with hot water- and kept the heat low. He opened the coffee valve at around 1 BAR and cut the shot short- just 25mls or so. Stunning! And quit a bit of Crema. He frothed up a tiny jug of micro foam to finish it off- it really was a quality coffee and I was very surprised.

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      • #4
        Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

        Originally posted by 2C302D2D3A312B36313E3C3039393A3A5F0 link=1246339682/2#2 date=1246439835
        The coffee brew can be very good- The manufacturer made a macchiato with the Bellman for me once- he roasted and ground his own beans- ground fairly fine- tamped carefully- started with hot water- and kept the heat low. He opened the coffee valve at around 1 BAR and cut the shot short- just 25mls or so. Stunning! And quit a bit of Crema. He frothed up a tiny jug of micro foam to finish it off- it really was a quality coffee and I was very surprised.
        Hey Jack,

        How did the guy get crema?

        Admittedly I have only had a few goes with my new one (thanks by the way) but I dont look remotely like getting crema.

        Thanks

        Chris

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

          Hello Chris,

          firstly the obvious: bean and grind. Bellman roasts his own and grinds immediately before use. I doubt you could ever get crema using supermarket coffee- too dry and stale.

          Secondly- careful packing- and a slow brew. The grind was medium/fine and the basket filled completely and lightly tamped down- then a little more coffee added and another light tamp. He started out with very hot water- and used quite a low flame. he let the pressure build up to around .75 Bar or so- then opened the coffee valve. With the tamp and grind he used the coffee flowed out in a steady smooth stream.

          Also he killed the brew quite early- just making 30ml shots.

          Let me know how you go trying those methods.


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          • #6
            Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

            Originally posted by 796578786F647E63646B69656C6C6F6F0A0 link=1246339682/4#4 date=1248313842
            Hello Chris,

            firstly the obvious: bean and grind. Bellman roasts his own and grinds immediately before use. I doubt you could ever get crema using supermarket coffee- too dry and stale.
            Jack

            Im using Guatemala Huehuetenango SHB 9-11 days post roast, and ground in a Kyocera ceramic burr grinder for immediate use.

            Originally posted by 796578786F647E63646B69656C6C6F6F0A0 link=1246339682/4#4 date=1248313842
            Secondly- careful packing- and a slow brew. The grind was medium/fine and the basket filled completely and lightly tamped down- then a little more coffee added and another light tamp. He started out with very hot water- and used quite a low flame. he let the pressure build up to around .75 Bar or so- then opened the coffee valve. With the tamp and grind he used the coffee flowed out in a steady smooth stream.

            Let me know how you go trying those methods.
            Yep, using hot water in the Bellman as well. Ill try the lower pressure and see how things go. I was using the 1.2-1.6 as per the book. It may be a combo of that and tamp/grind.

            Thanks

            Chris

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

              Hello Chris,

              sorry- I just re-read my original post and i pretty much repeated myself. I apologise for the obvious points...

              I think the lower pressure is a help- higher pressure means higher heat. If I was you I would experiment with a range of pressures starting out very low. You can actually make a brew with the coffee valve open at the start.

              I must admit I havent done as much practice with the Bellman as i would like- I am constantly restoring espresso machines, syphons and old moka pots and am totally spoiled for brewing methods. I have at least 40 options when i want to make a cup..... at the moment my obsession is lever machines...

              Did you read the article in the age recently about Moka pots? The author of that article told me he is getting nice crema from his bellman.

              However there is a caveat here: it is never going to be the same crema as from an espresso machine. In general it will be lighter with larger bubbles and dissipate quicker. Some would argue that its not crema at all - but some kind of fools crema.

              Until I see one of those espresso masters provide an actual scientific analysis of the two substances- that confirms their assertions- I will continue to call it crema, though I may indeed be a fool for so doing....

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                Originally posted by 677B6666717A607D7A75777B72727171140 link=1246339682/6#6 date=1248314970

                However there is a caveat here: it is never going to be the same crema as from an espresso machine. In general it will be lighter with larger bubbles and dissipate quicker. Some would argue that its not crema at all - but some kind of fools crema.

                Until I see one of those espresso masters provide an actual scientific analysis of the two substances- that confirms their assertions- I will continue to call it crema, though I may indeed be a fool for so doing....
                Hmm, No fools here
                I think that the brewing process is essentially the same, of course there is different pressures driving the process so outcome should be little different.
                Nothing wrong with calling it crema, especially where you make the distinction between the type of machine it was produced on.
                Bullitt

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                  Thats cool Jack

                  Not expecting espresso machine replication.

                  Just curious as my results so far are pretty average, or worse. Ill give the lower pressure a try. And roast some more beans ;D

                  Thanks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                    Originally posted by 1D2A3333362B2B5F0 link=1246339682/7#7 date=1248315516
                    Nothing wrong with calling it crema
                    I agree.

                    The Greeks call the foam on top of their brews "kaimaki" because the word "crema" is used for cream.
                    IIRC the Turks call it "crema".
                    I suggest the Turks may have been using the word "crema" a lot longer than the Italians.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                      Thanks guys,

                      its funny- I have gotten into forum stouches several times over this issue.

                      here is what I am talking about- in this case from a Sorrentina:



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                        The sorrentina works like the bellman would if you started with the coffee valve open. As the brew proceeds- the grinds expand- and the pressure builds up naturally. The trick is to find the correct grind (isnt it always?).

                        at the end the brew the crema bubbles get larger:



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                        • #13
                          Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                          Thanks Jack

                          Really useful and I now have a target to reach

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                            Oh and another hint:

                            dont grind as fine as you would for espresso. You dont want too much restriction of the water flow through the grinds. You are operating at much lower pressures, you want to grind fine enough that there is some resistance to the water, but if the coffee only dribbles out very slowly- you have probably ground too fine and/or packed too tight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Belman Stove Top Coffee Maker

                              I’ve had my bellman for 4months now and I’m getting good coffee now. My method is using a fine-medium grind (home espresso) and no tamping, only tapping the basket firmly on the bench to settle the coffee, making sure the basket is properly full. I’ve been starting the pour at around 1-1.3bar and cutting it short. I have to use an electric stove and it isn’t the best, gas is a lot better! The pour is thick and rich with only a little crema. I will post some photos soon and if anyone has any questions please ask.
                              When I get the time I will make a tamp with a hole in the centre to fit the basket properly so that even tamping can be achieved (very hard to tamp evenly with a teaspoon!)

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