Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Brew temperature, at fixed brew strength and extraction, has little impact...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Brew temperature, at fixed brew strength and extraction, has little impact...

    Brew temperature, at fixed brew strength and extraction, has little impact on the sensory profile of drip brew coffee
    Mackenzie E. Batali, William D. Ristenpart & Jean-Xavier Guinard
    Scientific Reports volume 10, Article number: 16450 (2020)
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-73341-4

    Published: 5th Oct 2020


    Abstract
    The brew temperature is widely considered a key parameter affecting the final quality of coffee, with a temperature near 93 °C often described as optimal. In particular, drip brewers that do not achieve a minimum brew temperature of 92 °C within a prescribed time period fail their certification. There is little empirical evidence in terms of rigorous sensory descriptive analysis or consumer preference testing, however, to support any particular range of brew temperatures. In this study, we drip-brewed coffee to specific brew strengths, as measured by total dissolved solids (TDS), and extraction yields, as measured by percent extraction (PE), spanning the range of the classic Coffee Brewing Control Chart. Three separate brew temperatures of 87 °C, 90 °C, or 93 °C were tested, adjusting the grind size and overall brew time as necessary to achieve the target TDS and PE. Although the TDS and PE both significantly affected the sensory profile of the coffee, surprisingly the brew temperature had no appreciable impact. We conclude that brew temperature should be considered as only one of several parameters that affect the extraction dynamics, and that ultimately the sensory profile is governed by differences in TDS and PE rather than the brew temperature, at least over the range of temperatures tested.

    Full PDF: s41598-020-73341-4.pdf

  • #2
    Interesting but this paper had one very important flaw...

    "tested at 87C ,90C ,93C"

    Not the 95C+ that many brewers brew at as they have to lift the water overhead without a pump.


    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Andy View Post
      Interesting but this paper had one very important flaw... "tested at 87C ,90C ,93C" Not the 95C+ that many brewers brew at as they have to lift the water overhead without a pump.
      Yeah it would’ve been good to see at least one lot of testing at >95deg. From my personal experience it would also make less difference than the grind/brew time parameter, but some coffees that extract a bit easier don’t suit the hotter brew temps.

      Comment


      • #4
        There's also the problem of this being a drip brewer so temperature is definitely lost over the brewing process. I think a temperature controlled french press using a Thermos or water bath or any full immersion brewing process would be better controlled. Would also help if they did water at 0-1c and boiling point just to fill my curiosity on tds at the extremes for that particular coffee.

        Comment


        • #5
          The decent owners forum has quite a bit of research showing temp does change taste, TDS and EY

          Comment


          • Lyrebird
            Lyrebird commented
            Editing a comment
            The paper cited controlled for extraction and strength (TDS being one way of expressing strength).

        • #6
          Originally posted by Budgiesmuggler View Post
          The decent owners forum has quite a bit of research showing temp does change taste, TDS and EY
          The Decent is espresso, Andy is talking about brewing or pour over style coffee

          Comment


          • #7
            Yep I know but some of the comments referred to espresso

            Comment

            Working...
            X