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Silva - heating takes 5+ mins

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  • #16
    Originally posted by koshari View Post
    The older elements were copper. The recent are stainless steel. Having said that I have a v1 where the element is still fine.
    thanks, so which is better - new V4 stainless steel element or the old V3 copper?

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    • #17
      The SS element should be a bit more immume from oxidisation. I suspect you would have had your boiler upgraded to a v4for that price so it's likely you have a Stainless element now.

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      • #18
        its not about "better"...its about a more convenient and cheaper fix when the element has blown and needs to be replaced. The new element is just an element.....requiring either some work to be done to the older version boiler to fit OR, the purchase of a new boiler top half.

        The superseded boilers had an integrated element, the latest boilers have holes drilled to accept a screw in element.

        We used to do this conversion when we were short on new stock of elements (ie inbetween shipments), but when stock of regular boiler/elements came in there was no incentive to spend time doing the conversion...

        If your element is working properly you would never consider the change until it shorts out. At that time your service provider will be able to give you the ducks guts on what is best to do, and from then on you only need to buy the element not the whole top half of the boiler.

        Hope that helps.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by acid_rider View Post
          thanks!

          Another question: if I never ever steam, I only make double-shots of espresso - so is there any reason or any requirement for me to use the middle or the bottom switch buttons on my Silvia and/or to ever open the steam wand round dial ??
          Yes there is. You would do the "prime boiler" function after if you run the reservoir out of water andf consequently if the pump runs partially dry. When you refill the reservoir, hit the water button and open the steam valve as per my post above. That will pump out the air lock that will be in the inlet water line as a result of you running it out of water...

          hope that helps.

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          • #20
            thanks!

            Originally posted by TOK View Post
            Yes there is. You would do the "prime boiler" function after if you run the reservoir out of water andf consequently if the pump runs partially dry. When you refill the reservoir, hit the water button and open the steam valve as per my post above. That will pump out the air lock that will be in the inlet water line as a result of you running it out of water...

            hope that helps.
            excellent, thanks.

            given that i never ever steam, under what conditions would my pump become partially dry?

            i never let the reservior run dry, i always fill it up (or top it up) before every use of the machine and i replace reservior water daily (when machine is switched off, of course).

            it therefore sounds to me that i would need to "prime boiler" only in event of an "accident" when i accidentally forgot to top up the reservoir and the machine was turned on at that time?

            did i understand you correctly ?

            much obliged once again

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            • #21
              Hi A-R.

              Yes, however answering for the general readership:

              While you may not run the tank dry there are plenty that do....It is not a rare occurence. The pump sucks air, there are air locks in the line or in the pump depending on how long the pump is running without water. That was the basis of my post # 19.

              Best to re prime when this occurs.

              In this case you can say you are not strictly priming the boiler, you (anyone) are repriming the water inlet circuit, but its still the same operation to make sure there is a steady feed through for optimum performance of the machine.

              Hope that helps.

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              • #22
                thanks! Great tips.

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                • #23
                  Happy to help and can I simply mention.....

                  Its not a question of needing to "prime" or not. Its more the idea of understanding that to keep a steady feed of water through the system, without airlocks, and the correct water level in the boiler etc, will keep the machine operating at optimim.

                  What does that do? It prolongs the life of the electric element which = many dollars not to mention much inconvenience saved

                  So if you have a hankering to "prime the boiler" just because you can, rather than think...I dont need to do that....think instead that it will NOT hurt to do so, in fact it is really helpful to you in the long run if nothing more than to understand the proper operation and management of the machine.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by TOK View Post
                    Happy to help and can I simply mention.....

                    Its not a question of needing to "prime" or not. Its more the idea of understanding that to keep a steady feed of water through the system, without airlocks, and the correct water level in the boiler etc, will keep the machine operating at optimim.

                    What does that do? It prolongs the life of the electric element which = many dollars not to mention much inconvenience saved

                    So if you have a hankering to "prime the boiler" just because you can, rather than think...I dont need to do that....think instead that it will NOT hurt to do so, in fact it is really helpful to you in the long run if nothing more than to understand the proper operation and management of the machine.
                    Very well said, in fact i did prime boiler this morning using the middle water switch and opening the steam wand (to extract ~250ml of water) when I first started the machine to heat up.
                    Then I let it sit for ~20 min and then I prepared the double shot, temp surfed using the top switch, extracted double espresso (closer to double ristretto to be more precise), and it was very good.

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