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  • BES900 leaking steam wand

    Hi all,

    My BES900 has suddenly started leaking water from the steam wand when it's idle. The machine is working fine in all other aspects and I have no pressure problems. Just water slowly dripping from the wand. I read posts saying it's the O-Rings and other stating it's a white silicone disc while others say it's just an adjustment. I'm confused

    Any thoughts on what might be the problem and where to obtain the required parts would be greatly appreciated.

    TIA

    Greg

  • #2
    None of those. The ball valve that controls steam flow will be leaking. It's not a serviceable part and needs to be replaced.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by noidle22 View Post
      None of those. The ball valve that controls steam flow will be leaking. It's not a serviceable part and needs to be replaced.
      Thanks for the reply. Is this the part you are referring to?
      Ball Valve Complete Kit [BES920XL/09.6] for Breville Appliance | eReplacement Parts

      Comment


      • #4
        That's it. Inbox me if you need one.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by noidle22 View Post
          That's it. Inbox me if you need one.
          Get the message below when trying to PM you.
          "noidle22 has exceeded their stored private messages quota and cannot accept further messages until they clear some space."

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          • #6
            Not trying to hijack, but anychance that this can also allow surges of water when using the steam wand? Not talking masses of water but little bursts here and there. I am also having the same issue with leaking but notice more when I first use the steam wand, but it seems to lessen/go when the wand was moved to a different position.... I just thought it was normal ������

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            • #7
              Realise this is an old thread, but I am looking to replace the ball valve. Prior pump replacement I found a great youtube video, but so far nothing on the ball valve. Can someone point me in the right direction for a tutorial on this?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Desbos View Post
                Realise this is an old thread, but I am looking to replace the ball valve. Prior pump replacement I found a great youtube video, but so far nothing on the ball valve. Can someone point me in the right direction for a tutorial on this?
                I too could not find any instructions to replace the ball valve, however it is very easy. I suggest you buy a new one and once you get it you can see how the old ones comes out. The trickiest part was getting the lever off as it is really on tight. You just need to pull it away from the machine. ie: When facing the machine looking at the front pull it to the right. It will eventually come off and you can remove the centre screw holding in the ball valve.

                Good Luck.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by gregeeh View Post
                  I too could not find any instructions to replace the ball valve, however it is very easy. I suggest you buy a new one and once you get it you can see how the old ones comes out. The trickiest part was getting the lever off as it is really on tight. You just need to pull it away from the machine. ie: When facing the machine looking at the front pull it to the right. It will eventually come off and you can remove the centre screw holding in the ball valve.

                  Good Luck.
                  Thanks for the tip. I'll give it a crack and report back.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's not hard. Once you get the covers off, you will see. Increasingly, the real trick is getting a replacement steam ball valve at all.

                    Tips: there is a small, size #007 o-ring on each end. While you're in there, you should replace each with a fresh new one. You don't need to get them from Breville. Any industrial supply or Amazon or eBay will do. I got 100 of them for $10 USD including shipping. When you put the clips back in the steel "hats" (you will know what I'm talking about when you get there), they will go in easier if you press down to compress the new o-ring. And DON'T lose the clips.

                    After you are done, you will look back at how easy it really was.

                    -Peter

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ball valve repair

                      Originally posted by pcrussell50 View Post
                      It's not hard. Once you get the covers off, you will see. Increasingly, the real trick is getting a replacement steam ball valve at all.

                      Tips: there is a small, size #007 o-ring on each end. While you're in there, you should replace each with a fresh new one. You don't need to get them from Breville. Any industrial supply or Amazon or eBay will do. I got 100 of them for $10 USD including shipping. When you put the clips back in the steel "hats" (you will know what I'm talking about when you get there), they will go in easier if you press down to compress the new o-ring. And DON'T lose the clips.

                      After you are done, you will look back at how easy it really was.

                      -Peter
                      You can repair the ball valve by pulling it completely apart and cleaning the ball part, then reversing the plastic seal that it rotates in.

                      Important to either replace the o-rings or be very careful with them. They are easily damaged while reattaching the valve in place. I bought a replacement valve after repairing it, only to find that my repair was good, but I had damaged the o-rings with steam leaking out.

                      David

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dbfcottee View Post
                        You can repair the ball valve by pulling it completely apart and cleaning the ball part, then reversing the plastic seal that it rotates in.

                        Important to either replace the o-rings or be very careful with them. They are easily damaged while reattaching the valve in place. I bought a replacement valve after repairing it, only to find that my repair was good, but I had damaged the o-rings with steam leaking out.

                        David
                        Correcto. Sorry I never updated this. I have now done four of these this way. In fact, I’m using a ratty old -900 valve that someone donated to me for “research” in a new -920. I flipped the seals a year ago, and it’s been going along leak free for the last year, just like a new machine.

                        https://www.home-barista.com/espress...7.html#p572160

                        I have begun advising people on the USA forums to save their $45USD for a new valve and service their existing valve by flipping the seals instead. Also, I found a bag of PTFE washers that are the exact diameter and thickness if one really needed to go that route. One of my spare valves is done that way.

                        -Peter
                        Last edited by pcrussell50; 19 February 2020, 04:34 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          O-rings?

                          Originally posted by pcrussell50 View Post
                          Correcto. Sorry I never updated this. I have now done four of these this way. In fact, I’m using a ratty old -900 valve that someone donated to me for “research” in a new -920. I flipped the seals a year ago, and it’s been going along leak free for the last year, just like a new machine.

                          https://www.home-barista.com/espresso-machines/breville-dual-boiler-ball-valve-detail-pics-t50907.html#p572160

                          I have begun advising people on the USA forums to save their $45USD for a new valve and service their existing valve by flipping the seals instead. Also, I found a bag of PTFE washers that are the exact diameter and thickness if one really needed to go that route. One of my spare valves is done that way.

                          -Peter
                          Peter - what are the washers/o-rings used in contact with the ball itself? Should I have a supply on hand if I take apart my assembly, or do you advise I can flip the plastic washer piece?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by irishtater View Post
                            Peter - what are the washers/o-rings used in contact with the ball itself? Should I have a supply on hand if I take apart my assembly, or do you advise I can flip the plastic washer piece?
                            The “plastic washer piece” you are referring to is actually TWO washers, one on either side of the ball. And they are PTFE material which for our purposes, behaves like a thick liquid. When you screw the two halves of the valve assembly together, you press the TWO seals against the ball and that is how your seal is formed. Over time, the seals “flow” very slowly and the pressure on the ball is lost and a drip develops. If you flip the seals over so that the conical sides that had been on the ball are now outboard from the ball. Screw the valve body back together until tension feels right. Not necessarily until both halves are fully together. Over time, the new sides seals will take on the shape of the ball, get loose again, and leak again. If there is still thread, you can tighten more. If not, you can flip the seals again. If they eventually become too daggy looking you can buy new PTFE washers. I forget the dimensions but they are somewhere in the thread I linked. As well as an Amazon link to where you can get a bag of them for under $10USD. Might be more here in Oz.

                            Skip ahead in the thread I linked, to post 93 on page 10:
                            And more detailed pic of the TWO PTFE seals, post 133 on page 14: Hope this helps. Feel free to ask more.

                            -Peter

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                            • #15
                              You are awesome. Thanks so much. I hadn't stumbled on the pages you refer to here, so I am grateful for the links.

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