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Is this boiler finished? or salvageable?

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  • Is this boiler finished? or salvageable?

    ​Hi all. My 11yo HX machine (Isomac Mondiale) started leaking from the OPV last week. I bought a new one, fitted it (with thread seal tape) and it was still leaking. Thinking I hadn't used enough thread tape I removed and refitted, still leaking. Then I had a closer look and discovered there's a rim around the top of the opening that had started to perish/corrode. Also, the blue fix-a-tap thread tape had been sitting in my garage for a year or two without the cover on - does that affect it?

    I bought some new thread tape yesterday (EnduraSeal Premium Grey) as well as some EnduraSeal Liquid Threadseal. Can either of those be expected to seal a new OPV in this boiler, or does the corrosion around the top suggest it's ready for scrap?

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Boiler1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	53.4 KB ID:	837528 Click image for larger version  Name:	Boiler2.jpg Views:	0 Size:	83.1 KB ID:	837529 Click image for larger version  Name:	Boiler3.jpg Views:	0 Size:	177.7 KB ID:	837530

  • #2
    Do you mean the safety valve or the anti vac valve? Given that it is leaking and attached to the boiler it is most likely an anti-vac valve (not safety valve). Either way there is often a copper washer below these components which sits below the fitting and is fairly soft, as such it makes a really good seal to the boiler.

    See how on each of these anti-vac valves there is a copper gasket below in the diagrams. As a short term you might get away with a nylon washer for a short period but best to pick up a couple of these. Your connection is most likely 1/4" BSP size.
    https://www.coffeeparts.com.au/anti-vacuum-valves

    OPV is the component one which set the maximum brew pressure and is attached to the pump/rubber piping.

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    • #3
      Yuk. Looks like it's been overtightened and cracked the fitting.
      i have found the fittings are tapered, and not have washers as roosterben said. So if tightened too much, the fitting splits.
      Repairs.... Try the liquid...
      Or price a new boiler. Or it can be repaired with a new fitting, but it will cost... It looks to be stainless?

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      • #4
        No, I wouldn't try to reuse that boiler.
        Looks to me as though pit/crevice corrosion has well and truly been established and would be far too risky to reuse.
        You could fix one point of corrosion and then, in time, another point of failure shows up. The boiler could also explode if there is enough deterioration in some unseen location on the inside of the boiler.

        Not a safe prospect in my opinion...

        Mal.

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        • #5
          Thanks all

          Originally posted by roosterben View Post
          Do you mean the safety valve or the anti vac valve?
          Yes you're right it's not the OPV, and I've learnt something since I've always thought that was the name of this part. I checked your link and it's the safety valve I'm referring to.

          Originally posted by Jackster View Post
          Yuk. Looks like it's been overtightened and cracked the fitting.
          I don't think it's been overtightened, at least not when I was fitting the new one, and apart from that I don't believe this valve has ever been touched.

          I thought these boilers were supposed to be stainless, but that top of the cracked fitting looks oddly misshapen and softer than stainless.

          Originally posted by Dimal View Post
          No, I wouldn't try to reuse that boiler.
          Looks to me as though pit/crevice corrosion has well and truly been established and would be far too risky to reuse.
          There's a black plastic part that fits between the valve and the boiler to catch excess water, which runs out in the drip tray, and the plastic has sort-of perished underneath it so that there was a fair bit of black gunk that needed to be cleaned up. I thought the pitting on the boiler might have been due to the perished plastic thing that was sitting on it. Stainless isn't supposed to corrode like that is it?

          A new boiler looks to be ~$450, and I'm concerned that when I start pulling other fittings off I might need to replace more than just the boiler. It's been a good machine, but still not an easy decision to replace the boiler if it might end up costing as much as replacing with an equivalent s/h machine.

          I figured that if the liquid thread seal would secure the new (or old) safety valve back in there leak-free, it might last a bit longer before I cough up for a replacement, but if it's going to be dangerous, then... maybe not.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dimal View Post
            The boiler could also explode if there is enough deterioration in some unseen location on the inside of the boiler.

            Not a safe prospect in my opinion...

            Mal.
            Reminds me of this one

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            • #7
              I like the meeting in the background

              "do ya reckon it's salvageable"

              Cheers

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cooper69S View Post
                Stainless isn't supposed to corrode like that is it?
                It can and does in the presence of Chlorine Compounds, but Heat and Pressure make the whole situation worse...
                That's why we always recommend such stringent water filtering for machines with s/s boilers...

                Mal.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SanderP View Post
                  I like the meeting in the background

                  "do ya reckon it's salvageable"

                  Cheers
                  It'll buff right out 😂

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