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  • Clear naked portafilter

    Nice shot from a very low dose....

    http://vimeo.com/89652511
    Last edited by Javaphile; 18 March 2019, 04:03 PM. Reason: Fixed link

  • #2
    Very cool
    And no tamp by the looks. We do stress over the minutae sometimes, don't we!

    Comment


    • #3
      Not just a clear PF, a clear basket as well!

      Comment


      • #4
        There's a curious effect around 22 seconds where the grinds lift up before the water comes in. That looks like it would break apart any tamping done.

        Also it seems a long preinfusion time; that 1st basket sits for 16 secs in one shot then about another 12 in the 2nd shot - I don't know if he showed us repeat footage or not but even if so, 16 secs seems a long time and if not, that's about a 30 sec preinfusion time. Wouldn't that stuff the coffee taste?

        Comment


        • #5
          Some very interesting background on this project, from HB, which confirms it's in slo-mo:

          It surprised me that so far there are just these two clips, but after corresponding with Stephen and getting the updates on his first TPF model and the next one, I got a better understanding of the problems that arise when building such a one-off tool.

          One needs to find a way to replace both the wall of the portafilter and the basket itself with something transparent, but it needs to hold the metal bottom of a normal filter basket. Also, the top should lock in securely to the brew group. Then, the combination of very different materials (metal, acrylic, sealant) must be able to all hold together in temperatures rising and falling very quickly from room temperature to temperatures close to the temperature of boiling water, and huge pressure differences from the pressure in the room (on the bottom) to 8 or 9 bar (at the top). Plus, a coffee puck tamped inside, air and water flowing around...

          I can now imagine how the Spaziale team would maybe have felt the urge to push further and use their TPF more, but it's possible that it didn't hold that long and the manager, looking at the cost in time and materials, likely veto'd any further exploits.

          Stephens final TPF held out during a few tests in his workshop and it stayed in one piece during fifteen tests Roemer Overdiep and I did in Amsterdam on the Londinium I lever machine, but then it too began to give. One side is starting to pop open and from what I heard from Stephen, you do not want to be standing very close, peering at the looking glass, when it pops open en explodes hot water and coffee grinds in your face.

          Before we started documenting these TPF experiments, we rented a Sony 4K High Speed camcorder. It fits the Canon prime lenses we have available so we would not miss any detail.

          We also learned something we would maybe not have found out without the TPF: when using a tamper that fits very tight, it's best to tamp lightly. After finishing a firm tamp and pulling back the tamper, the puck can be pulled loose along the sides and this results in the puck jumping up and being slammed down again when the spring lever is being pulled. In a pump machine the puck will not jump up of course, but the seal along the outside of the puck will allow some initial flow.

          The "puck jump" happens very fast but is very clearly seen when we use the super slow motion feature of the camera. It hardly causes a problem but to get a nice and even flow when using a very tight fitting tamper, tamping lightly seems advised.

          When we used the tamper that fits my millennium La Pavoni Europiccola, that proved a very nice fit for Stephens TPF and the puck remained still, allowing the raised piston to suck in air through the puck instead of along the sides. Sadly, by the time we figured that out, the life cycle of the TPF was nearing the end and we couldn't risk damaging the $10.000 camera...

          For a short moment (elongated in the footage) there's a lot more coffee flying around in the TPF than I imagined there would be, but very swiftly, once the pressure is applied, all clears up and you can see the tiniest stream of water along the grains of coffee grinds and air and CO2 struggling to get out of the way.

          We cannot thank Stephen Sweeney enough for making this little project possible!

          Comment


          • #6
            .??? Link...?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by blend52 View Post
              .??? Link...?
              Try post 1 this thread.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                Try post 1 this thread.
                i did.....nothing there ???

                EDIT:
                OK, dumped the Ipad, and switched onto the old PC and now the Video shows.

                Note to self. Keep away from Apple products. They screw with your head !

                Comment


                • #9
                  Same problem, link does not appear on ipad, here it is as a URL link instead of video......

                  Stephen Sweeney's TPF - Transparent PortaFilter on Vimeo

                  Alternatively it's vimeo.com/89652511

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Better off reading about it from its originator on HB.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Transparent Portafilter

                      FINALLY! Transparent portafilter espresso extraction videos - Tips and Techniques • Home-Barista.com
                      looks nice and now, we know what happen inside there.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Pretty sure I've seen that here before. Even the second shot looked like a gusher to me...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Geez I wish I'd thought to post that....

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jonathon View Post
                            Some very interesting background on this project, from HB, which confirms it's in slo-mo:

                            It surprised me that so far there are just these two clips, but after corresponding with Stephen and getting the updates on his first TPF model and the next one, I got a better understanding of the problems that arise when building such a one-off tool.

                            One needs to find a way to replace both the wall of the portafilter and the basket itself with something transparent, but it needs to hold the metal bottom of a normal filter basket. Also, the top should lock in securely to the brew group. Then, the combination of very different materials (metal, acrylic, sealant) must be able to all hold together in temperatures rising and falling very quickly from room temperature to temperatures close to the temperature of boiling water, and huge pressure differences from the pressure in the room (on the bottom) to 8 or 9 bar (at the top). Plus, a coffee puck tamped inside, air and water flowing around...

                            I can now imagine how the Spaziale team would maybe have felt the urge to push further and use their TPF more, but it's possible that it didn't hold that long and the manager, looking at the cost in time and materials, likely veto'd any further exploits.

                            Stephens final TPF held out during a few tests in his workshop and it stayed in one piece during fifteen tests Roemer Overdiep and I did in Amsterdam on the Londinium I lever machine, but then it too began to give. One side is starting to pop open and from what I heard from Stephen, you do not want to be standing very close, peering at the looking glass, when it pops open en explodes hot water and coffee grinds in your face.

                            Before we started documenting these TPF experiments, we rented a Sony 4K High Speed camcorder. It fits the Canon prime lenses we have available so we would not miss any detail.

                            We also learned something we would maybe not have found out without the TPF: when using a tamper that fits very tight, it's best to tamp lightly. After finishing a firm tamp and pulling back the tamper, the puck can be pulled loose along the sides and this results in the puck jumping up and being slammed down again when the spring lever is being pulled. In a pump machine the puck will not jump up of course, but the seal along the outside of the puck will allow some initial flow.

                            The "puck jump" happens very fast but is very clearly seen when we use the super slow motion feature of the camera. It hardly causes a problem but to get a nice and even flow when using a very tight fitting tamper, tamping lightly seems advised.

                            When we used the tamper that fits my millennium La Pavoni Europiccola, that proved a very nice fit for Stephens TPF and the puck remained still, allowing the raised piston to suck in air through the puck instead of along the sides. Sadly, by the time we figured that out, the life cycle of the TPF was nearing the end and we couldn't risk damaging the $10.000 camera...

                            For a short moment (elongated in the footage) there's a lot more coffee flying around in the TPF than I imagined there would be, but very swiftly, once the pressure is applied, all clears up and you can see the tiniest stream of water along the grains of coffee grinds and air and CO2 struggling to get out of the way.

                            We cannot thank Stephen Sweeney enough for making this little project possible!
                            Hi Johnathon,

                            Is the above a quote or paraphrase from a secondary source, or is the "I" in the text actually you?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by chokkidog View Post
                              Hi Johnathon,

                              Is the above a quote or paraphrase from a secondary source, or is the "I" in the text actually you?
                              Straight quote from the HB site.

                              Comment

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