Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

An American percolator in Australia - power adapter?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • An American percolator in Australia - power adapter?

    Hey all just received a presto percolator. Reading up online, it has some very big fans.

    Problem is it came with the USA power lead.

    So can I stick an adapter on it and use it or do I need a transformer?

  • #2
    You need a step-down transformer.... else you will "let the smoke out" when you plug it in.

    The transformer should match or exceed the current draw of the device, you might find it's a fairly large transformer needed to get this working too.
    (circa $150-$250 for a quality transformer)

    Comment


    • #3
      Check the power markings on the device (if it has any). Some devices have a full-range power input (eg marked as 100-240VAC) so you can get away with just an adapter.

      Otherwise Andy is right: a transformer is required, and possibly a pretty big one depending on power draw.

      Comment


      • #4
        "Universal" power input (100-250V, 50-60Hz) usually only applies to some electronic and not electrical items. Anything with a heating element or a mains voltage electric motor is (almost?*) always going to need a transformer. Amazon describes presto percolators as being designed for North American power, so you'll need a transformer.

        *I included "almost" because if I didn't, there is bound to be at least one person on this site who would quickly contradict me.

        Comment


        • #5
          From the Amazon description of the 12 cup model, it is 120 volts, 60 Hz only.
          You'll need a step down transformer with enough power to handle the startup load

          Comment


          • #6
            An American percolator in Australia - power adapter?

            What's the difference between an electronic and an electrical item? ;-)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by fruity View Post
              What's the difference between an electronic and an electrical item? ;-)
              Heaps!

              Electrical devices were those which used electrical power but did not include electronic components (transistors, integrated circuits etc.). Examples would be lamps, heaters, vacuum cleaners and kitchen items such as kettles, refrigerators etc.... on the other hand...electronic items, obviously, do incorporate electronic components.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Vinitasse View Post
                Heaps!

                Electrical devices were those which used electrical power but did not include electronic components (transistors, integrated circuits etc.). Examples would be lamps, heaters, vacuum cleaners and kitchen items such as kettles, refrigerators etc.... on the other hand...electronic items, obviously, do incorporate electronic components.
                Interesting! Can't say I would have ever tried to differentiate the two that way.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by fruity View Post
                  Interesting! Can't say I would have ever tried to differentiate the two that way.
                  Whether or not you choose to differentiate these two disciplines or not, they are... in fact... quite distinct and that is why there are Electrical Engineers AND Electronics Engineers and also the reason why, on the one hand, we have Electricians and, on the other, Electronics Technicians.

                  The basis of the distinction actually hinges on the exchange of electrons across space. The original "electronic" device was the vacuum tube where electrons flowed from one plate to another across a vacuum. This is the fundamental defining factor. As technology developed printed circuits and chips the concept of electrons moving over space, as opposed to through a conductor only, still fits... whereas... the flow of electrons through a conductor falls within the "electric" realm.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Vinitasse is pretty well on the money, although some electrical devices do incorporate electronic controlling components.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                      Vinitasse is pretty well on the money, although some electrical devices do incorporate electronic controlling components.
                      Very true Yelta... but I would argue that any electrical device with added electronic circuitry would fall into the definition of being an electronic device

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks all. On the unit itself it says approx (actually a squiggly -) 125v at 10a and approx 250v at 5a.

                        Since I'm not going to pay a couple of hundred dollars to run this thing can I just plug it in and see. I don't care if the unit blows as it unusable anyway but if their is a risk of me burning the house down i would rather not.

                        My wife has purchased hair straightness from USA and run them without a transformer. So maybe just plug it in and see?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by zaheerkha View Post
                          Thanks all. On the unit itself it says approx (actually a squiggly -) 125v at 10a and approx 250v at 5a.

                          Since I'm not going to pay a couple of hundred dollars to run this thing can I just plug it in and see. I don't care if the unit blows as it unusable anyway but if their is a risk of me burning the house down i would rather not.

                          My wife has purchased hair straightness from USA and run them without a transformer. So maybe just plug it in and see?
                          Crikey! your a braver man than I am.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wow, hopefully the device has a fuse inside that will pop before you do.

                            The hair device might be dual voltage? Giving something mains powered double the volts normally generates unwanted excitement.

                            Cheers

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not brave probably stupid.

                              If I get bored this weekend and I do it I'll post some pics.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X