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Best water for a home machine

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  • Best water for a home machine

    Hi,

    Can anyone recommend the best way to get quality water for a home machine?

    I'm using bottled water and that's inconvenient and expensive.

    Is there a small filter system (similar to Brita) that does a good job? I need a small system, not a plumbed in system.

    Thanks all.
    Paul

  • #2
    I have a little Brita pitcher. It's a little slow to fill. I'd like a under-the-counter one: Aquapure makes a nice unit. I'll take a look at the Aquapure as I'm going to the hardware store today - let you know the price.

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    • #3
      Have you had a read of the sticky on brewing water?


      Java "Sticky what?!?" phile
      Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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      • #4
        If you do struggle your way through the long, sticky thread on brewing water, you'll find a big push for people to buy a quality water filtration system.

        You're in Melbourne and the water there is reputed to be quite good. I'm in Canberra and the water here is not quite as soft as in Melbourne but it's still pretty good. I too am using a Brita jug and I find it hard to believe that it's not adequate in places where the water quality out of the tap is not too bad to start with, provided that I replace the filter a little ahead of time. (There are some places with very hard water and I would probably install an in-line filter if I lived in one of those.)

        Based on that long and sticky thread I expect a negative reaction to this view. I will find out whether I'm right or wrong at the first annual service for my machine.

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        • #5
          I'm an ex-scientist and used to run equipment using filtered water.

          After the filtration system a deionised resin tank was essential to get rid of the Silica.

          I guess I'm looking for a system similar to Brita with a deionising resin included in the filtration canister. Any ideas on that????

          I'll start my way through that massive thread Java

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          • #6
            You probably know more than most people here then, and much more than me. So I'd be interested in what you decide, in due course.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pauly404 View Post
              I'm an ex-scientist and used to run equipment using filtered water.

              After the filtration system a deionised resin tank was essential to get rid of the Silica.

              I guess I'm looking for a system similar to Brita with a deionising resin included in the filtration canister. Any ideas on that????

              I'll start my way through that massive thread Java
              An ex scientist eh? tell us more.

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              • #8
                Well.... Only just ex. I moved into project management so now I manage a team of scientists...

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                • #9
                  The Aqua Pro bench top water filter/softener from Bombora can be a good choice. It's small, and has a diverter valve that attaches to your kitchen sink tap so no need to plumb-in.

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                  • #10
                    I think the only way to really determine what you need is to measure the TH and TDS of your water and find a suitable filter from there (which may be nothing). I would also recommend checking the specs of any filter offered to you to make sure it will produce water with appropriate TH and TDS and then test the filtered water to make sure the result is as expected. I supplied my water test results to a filter retailer specializing in filtration for coffee machines and purchased the filter they recommended. I tested the filtered water and the TH was still too high. I checked the in-coming water and TH was as expected and close to as reported to the retailer. I checked the filter specs and found it was working correctly but that it could not reduce the TH by the amount required.

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                    • #11
                      Thanks Pete

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                      • #12
                        Filtration | Talk Coffee

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                        • #13
                          A BRITA system may be sufficient for the soft water in most Australian cities, either that or you could hook up an inline water filter (i.e. the type em6910 ships with, or this from talkcoffee). While I've seen people here claim BRITA will do nothing for scale build up, thats not true - basically the cartridges contain activated carbon (to remove chlorine and organic compounds), along with an ion exchange resin which swaps calcium for sodium. That resin is the same as the inline filters which can conveniently be regenerated in salty water. Scientific grade water is very different in that it uses reverse osmosis to remove metal ions completely.

                          If you want to know where you stand you would need to do what pete did and actually measure it. The 'flavour' of water (and presumably coffee) will be affected by the ion content - the end goal isn't to remove all of the calcium and magnesium. Also the simple act of filtration would help reduce the amount of insoluble crud sticking to the inside of your machine. If you own a high end machine the investment is definitely worthwhile!

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                          • #14
                            Yes- as per our post above yours, a brita cheapie from a supermarket might soften water for the first few litres on a new cartridge. It's a drinking water filter, not a coffee filter. FWIW, I don't place massive faith on the inline ones either. In the majority of cases, owners forget to freshen them or don't know/don't care.

                            For mine, the bidding starts with http://www.talkcoffee.com.au/shop/aq...ration-system/

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                            • #15
                              Thanks Chris. I agree with you there.

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