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  • Stepping up to Expobar.

    Hey guys,

    Im thinking of possibily stepping up from my Breville dual boiler to the Expobar Minore. Ive read nothing but great stuff about this machine. I just wanted to guage peoples opinions on this step up.

    Also in terms of a new machine that i get, i want something which is reasonably easy to service DIY. Obviously in machines some parts are specifically designed but ease of home servicing in my mind is a huge plus. How accessable are parts for this machine?

    Cheers guys. Is it worth the step up?

  • #2
    I don't know anything about the Expobar but have you considered the VBM Domobar Junior? Similar, slightly smaller footprint to the BDB. Just a thought mate. I get why you are feeling like this.

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    • #3
      G'day thirteen,

      If I was asked to recommend a machine which was simple and easy for you to repair in the future if you so choose, I'd definitely be suggesting a well configured HX machine. If these are setup correctly, there is no such thing as a cooling flush. You simply walk up to them, use them and if you do what you do well, drink great coffee.

      For ease of repair, a boiler which is horizontally mounted can be a bonus as the gear which sits on top of the boiler has more real estate- easier to get to with tools.

      For mine, perhaps a pre-loved Giotto Premium Plus or Plus V2- or something with similar architecture. I think there are some currently in the For Sale section. Once you head down the dual boiler PID route, you have a much more complex machine and more proprietary parts. Whilst many think that the only way to get great coffee and repeatability is PID and dual boiler, it just aint so.

      Good luck in your search.

      Chris

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      • #4
        Yeah its true, i find with the BDB, i really dont use any of the customizable advanced features. Ive honestly only run the machine on the stock settings and it does a great job! With the repairing aside (this is a definately bonus but not the clencher) How does the expobar perform, is it a worthy upgrade ? A minimal jump thats not a justifiable cost ? Someone who has had good use of both machines please let me know.

        Thanks

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        • #5
          I went from a basic Sunbeam to a Minore and couldn't be happier. Easy to use, produces good coffee every shot, heats up fast. The SB could be a bit hit and miss and was hard work by comparison, but still made good coffee despite the shortcomings. Just be mindful to keep the brew head clean and use filtered water. Should last for years without any major work.

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          • #6
            I agree with Bernsbrew, my Minore hasn't missed a beat and yes it makes a great shot every time. If anything ever goes wrong with shot quality it comes back to me not the machine. I also advice in keeping it clean and also use filtered water. My previous machine was a Kitchenaide artisan and a sunbeam.

            Although i cant speak for other machines, i will say there are many others which would be as good and even better than the minore.
            Take into consideration what Chris (Talk coffee) above has said..

            Cheers and good luck

            Chris

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            • #7
              Just to add, when you see it in the raw with the cover off, it's built like a German tank. Thick steel. Good quality parts. Very solidly made through out. Lacks a bit of finesse on the finishing side perhaps, some sharp edges inside and may not look as pretty as some Italian units, but the important things Expobar has gotten right. I tend to put function before form. I don't think it would disappoint you. And at the end of the day, what machine isn't a box on the bench.
              Bern
              PS it's also one of the heavier machines, that can be a plus or a minus depending.

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              • #8
                Just to chip in - I too have a Minore. Yup - built like a tank. I have to say - it is actually quite straight forward to monkey with though.

                The E61 group head (irrespective of what anyone's personal view of the efficacy of the E61...) - is a breeze to take apart and deal with. I do take it apart to apply lube after I chemically backflush. The only significant thing that is wrong with mine is the LED display which has some segments that don't light up. So the next time I pull it to bits, I'll be fixing that.

                Everything inside is actually totally solid, and you should have a long service life out of it.

                It also makes absolutely fabulous shots, and it has the capacity to run shot-to-shot for quite some time. Big family gatherings are a breeze..

                Go for it!

                /Kevin

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                • #9
                  Cool guys, thanks for the advice. I'm finding the BDB makes very good coffee and honestly im happy to stick with this, but has anyone had any personal experience between these 2 machines. My reasoning is, i wouldnt get rid of the BDB, i reckon it does the job really well, however because i tend to be away from home for longer periods at times, i wanted to have access to 2 machines so i dont need to get out the aeropress

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                  • #10
                    I have a lot of experience of the Expobar, but only limited experience with the BES900..

                    A mate bought one relatively soon after they were released, and at the time I did say to him I thought it made a great shot (used the demo one at Beanology that year). I've not done a back-to-back comparison, but the coffee didn't taste as good through the Breville. At least, not with the "Smart Grinder" he got with the machine. He brought both in to work one day and we ran a comparison shot - using the Compak K3 and the "Smart Grinder". Noticeably better with the Compak. As good as the shot from the Wega 2-group we have in the tea room.

                    So as long as you get the right grinder, I reckon you won't pick the difference.

                    And as a follow on from my comment above- the Expobar is one of the fastest to warm up machines I've played with. 15 minutes is all it needs. 10 at a pinch, if you flush the group and then wait a minute. Quite impressively quick!

                    /Kevin

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KJM View Post
                      So as long as you get the right grinder, I reckon you won't pick the difference.

                      And as a follow on from my comment above- the Expobar is one of the fastest to warm up machines I've played with. 15 minutes is all it needs. 10 at a pinch, if you flush the group and then wait a minute. Quite impressively quick!

                      /Kevin
                      Couldn't agree more KJM.

                      I bought my Expobar while having a relatively new smart grinder and apart from the adjusting to the Expobar, the coffee (extraction/taste) was a vast improvement to me.

                      BUT! After purchasing a Mazzer Luigi, the improvement again was hugely noticeable.

                      I still use the smart grinder for other brewing methods so I don't have to muck around with the Mazzer's espresso setting.

                      However the Mazzer upgrade certainly highlighted the importance of selecting a good grinder in coffee making.

                      And yeah, the fast warm up time is really a great asset!

                      Unless you need your coffee hit after just taking a few steps from your bed, (I imagine there are a few out there! ) there is usually time for it to get up to temp.

                      Cheers,
                      Kevo

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kevo View Post

                        Unless you need your coffee hit after just taking a few steps from your bed, (I imagine there are a few out there! ) there is usually time for it to get up to temp.

                        Cheers,
                        Kevo
                        I bought a digital electric timer, I think it was from Big W, it cost about $15. It has about 20 timer setups available so a different on time can be set for the weekends and weekdays. It also has an inbuilt battery backup, so if there is a power failure all the settings are saved. This lets me snooze on whilst the machine warms itself up and is ready when I get up. Takes my Giove DB about 20 mins to get up to speed.

                        Sorry for the thread drift.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for the thread. Very useful

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