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JURA ENA 9 One touch milk is cold

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  • JURA ENA 9 One touch milk is cold

    Morning everyone.
    I finally took the plunge and purchased a JURA ENA 9 One touch from HN Cairns.
    I've set it up the best I can with the info in the manual, however the milk is still cold for my Cappuccinos.
    (I have cappuccinos as I can't work out the Flat White setting on the machine, flat white being my preferred drink).
    Can anyone assist me with the process to increase the milk temperature? I do get a form of froth, but again, I end up with a luke warm milk drink. I can't find any info on how to increase the milk temp on the JURA web site, and I have increased the water temp to High.
    Perhapse I will have to resort to using my Sunbeam milk frothed and just use the JURA to make the straight coffee. At least I would be able to make a flat white that way (although it negates the reason I purchased the ENA 9 in the first place.
    Thanks for any assistance and best wishes.

    Ken
    Last edited by Baytown; 27 April 2013, 10:18 AM.

  • #2
    If the auto frother has an adjuster dial on it, turn the dial until you get the slowest passage of milk through the frother.

    If the auto frother is the most basic type with no adjuster, slow the passage of milk through by inserting a restrictor in the end of the hose in the milk. That is, to make the inlet hole smaller.

    Either way, that slows the passage of milk through resulting in a higher temp. If you go too far, you will burn the milk.

    You could also trying calling the service 1800 (or 1300 ???) number. There should be a sticker around the machine somewhere, sometimes inside the lid of the grinder.

    Note, someone's version of not hot enough, will be someone elses version of too hot, and all being well, the milk temperature regulation of your new machine should be correct. So expect they will ask a few questions to see if you are just one of those people that likes their milk to be virtually at scalding point (and if so that is outside the correct working temp set on the machine (ie, nothing wrong). In any case you would then still be able to take the above advice to heat it up further for yourself, and it wont void any new machine guarantee.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the informative reply TOK. Re my preferred coffee temp, hot is fine. The temp my coffee ends up is luke warm at best due to the cold milk. I'll experiment with the venturi as advised. I did get a reply from JURA as well, and seems that the machine doesn't allow for adjustment of the milk temp. They did send some suggestions though which I'll try out. Hmmm, wish I knew that at purchase!

      Best wishes.

      Ken

      Comment


      • #4
        Milk Temp

        Can you please help me understand what you mean when you say " slow the passage of milk through by inserting a restrictor in the end of the hose in the milk" - how exactly do you do this?

        Regards,

        Originally posted by TOK View Post
        If the auto frother has an adjuster dial on it, turn the dial until you get the slowest passage of milk through the frother.

        If the auto frother is the most basic type with no adjuster, slow the passage of milk through by inserting a restrictor in the end of the hose in the milk. That is, to make the inlet hole smaller.

        Either way, that slows the passage of milk through resulting in a higher temp. If you go too far, you will burn the milk.

        You could also trying calling the service 1800 (or 1300 ???) number. There should be a sticker around the machine somewhere, sometimes inside the lid of the grinder.

        Note, someone's version of not hot enough, will be someone elses version of too hot, and all being well, the milk temperature regulation of your new machine should be correct. So expect they will ask a few questions to see if you are just one of those people that likes their milk to be virtually at scalding point (and if so that is outside the correct working temp set on the machine (ie, nothing wrong). In any case you would then still be able to take the above advice to heat it up further for yourself, and it wont void any new machine guarantee.

        Comment


        • #5
          Welcome to CS.

          Lilterally....place something in the end of the suction tube, that results in a smaller hole (than the suction tube). That slows the passage of milk up the tube, and it comes out hotter.

          You will need to experiment with different sized stuff. EG....you could try cutting a bit off the end of the ink tube on a biro (if it is going to be a good fit into the silicon milk tube). If it has a smaller internal diameter than the silicon tuibe, you should be in business...

          Anyway that gives you the idea...

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