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Lelit PL60T V2 Dual Boiler Tweaks.

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  • Lelit PL60T V2 Dual Boiler Tweaks.

    I know a lot of owners around here aren't into modifying/ tweaking their own machines, but pulling apart electro-mechanical devices is day to day business for me.
    Now, being one who likes efficiency, I've already insulated the boilers on my machine which has seen a noticeable decrease in boiler element "on" times, and required some adjustments to the PID controller to suit.

    My next tweak that i'm considering is the addition of a pre-heater for the brew boiler.
    I read a review another dual boiler machine (Alex Duetto I believe) and it incorporates a brew-water preheater HX into the steam boiler, then it's off to it's own boiler to be heated fully.
    I live in Hobart, and my kitchen can easily drop to 10 degrees or colder overnight. As such, so does the water in the reservoir on my machine.

    My plan is to use the steam boiler and a couple of laps of copper piping as the heat-exchanger to pre-heat the water being fed into the brew boiler.
    As you can see by the image below, the pump outlet fitting is directly in line with a nice small gap between the steam boiler (right rear) and the reservoir/ case.
    Removing the silicone piping and using some 1/8" copper tubing and pressure fittings at that point, have 2 or 3 laps around the steam boiler, then back into the existing silicone tunbing to feed the brew boiler with pre-heated water should be sufficient to raise the incoming temps, shorten re-cycle time, and reduce temperature drops when pulling a shot.

    LELIT



    And here you can see the Alex with the feed between the boilers

    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    Just updating my list of tweaks I've been making to this machine.

    Years ago a wine-soaked Italian barista/ designer decided it would be a great idea to build a nice dual-boiler machine out of Stainless Steel and Brass
    He took his idea into production, at the Lelit factory but at the last minute, the company executive decided he needed a new Ferrari so some cost cutting had to happen.
    They decided to replace all the screws in the machine with zinc coated versions instead of stainless steel.

    As such after 18 months of use with steam and water making it's way into the housing, the internal and external case screws that hold it all together are now rusted.

    So Last night I stripped the entire case from the machine, and removed almost every screw holding it together to replace them with quality stainless steel fasteners.
    There were only around 25 screws in total costing me next to nothing at the local engineering fastener store.

    There were two which required undoing from underneath with pliers, as the phillips head slots were so badly corroded that a screwdriver simply rounded them out.

    Once the lower case was separated from the upper part, I cleaned all the rust off, re-routed and loomed up the wiring into the main control box for a tidier arrangement inside the machine.

    What astounds me is how little it would actually cost to use stainless screws out of the factory.
    I purchased a box of 100, M5x10mm screws at $17, and an assortment box of 500 self tapping sheet metal screws for another $24.
    That's less than 15c each.
    For a $2000 machine that has about 40 screws in total, you're looking at a whopping $6 extra.
    But at wholesale factory costs, it would be lucky to add an extra $1 to the manufacture costs.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Robbks View Post
      Just updating my list of tweaks I've been making to this machine.

      Years ago a wine-soaked Italian barista/ designer decided it would be a great idea to build a nice dual-boiler machine out of Stainless Steel and Brass
      He took his idea into production, at the Lelit factory but at the last minute, the company executive decided he needed a new Ferrari so some cost cutting had to happen.
      They decided to replace all the screws in the machine with zinc coated versions instead of stainless steel.

      As such after 18 months of use with steam and water making it's way into the housing, the internal and external case screws that hold it all together are now rusted.

      So Last night I stripped the entire case from the machine, and removed almost every screw holding it together to replace them with quality stainless steel fasteners.
      There were only around 25 screws in total costing me next to nothing at the local engineering fastener store.

      There were two which required undoing from underneath with pliers, as the phillips head slots were so badly corroded that a screwdriver simply rounded them out.

      Once the lower case was separated from the upper part, I cleaned all the rust off, re-routed and loomed up the wiring into the main control box for a tidier arrangement inside the machine.

      What astounds me is how little it would actually cost to use stainless screws out of the factory.
      I purchased a box of 100, M5x10mm screws at $17, and an assortment box of 500 self tapping sheet metal screws for another $24.
      That's less than 15c each.
      For a $2000 machine that has about 40 screws in total, you're looking at a whopping $6 extra.
      But at wholesale factory costs, it would be lucky to add an extra $1 to the manufacture costs.
      hi Robbks

      just wondering if you encountered any rust inside the Lelit other than the screws?

      Roly

      Comment


      • #4
        Hello roly and welcome.

        One thing to keep in mind is that the internals of a machine should be a warm environment, but not a wet environment. If there are steam leaks, the machine should be serviced. If there is water around from overfill, it also needs to be attended to.

        All that is needed for galvanic corrosion in a moist environment is 2 different metals and some heat. Stainless will rust as well.

        It's prudent to fill the Lelit tank (and others of similar design) away from the from the machine and if there is anything unusual happening with your machine, you should refer it back to the place of purchase for service and/or repair.

        Long term water and steam leaks are not desirable in any machine. For you in WA, water quality will also be critical.

        Cheers

        Chris

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Chris, thanks for your insight. Reading the post above about the screws rusting got me thinking is that the only place that will rust on this machine?

          I did notice a small amount of corrosion on the bottom of my machine when I packed it up the other day to send back to Jetblack to have an unknown problem fixed.

          Yeah water in Perth (depending where you are) can by a little iffy. My machine has always had filtered or rain water in it.

          Roly


          **apologies for thread hijack**

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi Roly,

            Galvanised screws are OK for the most part but are prone to rusting if they stay wet - Chris is spot on about his advice to avoid this happening. The rest of the body is stainless steel so rust shouldn't be an issue with normal use. The latest batch of PL60T are coming out of the factory with stainless steel screws now

            Will be in touch soon,

            charlie

            Comment


            • #7
              Robbks why the change to the PID controller after insulating the boilers?
              Did you follow through with your pre heat mod?

              Comment

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