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  • #16
    Originally posted by level3ninja View Post
    This is one of the parts that annoys me. They can't put proper care instructions in because almost no one would follow them. They'd perhaps have an easier time of denying warranty claims, but once it got out that you actually had to do stuff to Breville machines, but e.g. Sunbeam still only said to do the bare minimum, people would flock to Sunbeam, or whatever brand has the least maintenance required. Not that most people do what's in the manual now, My in-laws bought a 920 because their Saeco VV (over 20 years old) was starting to show signs the end was near, the 920 was on sale, and they know how much I like mine. I tried to explain my cleaning and maintenance routines to them. Got shut down almost immediately and was told they wouldn't be doing all that (I think I'd only gotten up to flushing the group after pulling a shot, yes after every shot, yes you push the button again twice, yes every time, no it only takes a second, push push and that's it, too much to remember ok). They literally never did any maintenance on the VV, filled up the water tank and emptied the drip tray, for 20 odd years. Somehow the coffee at their house has gotten worse since they got the 920. I used to chance it if I needed the caffeine, I think I've had 2 coffees since they upgraded. Part of me wonders if people paid $2-3k for them if they'd be willing to look after them properly. Maybe they should release a line of "long life coffee machines" where the only difference is they up the price by 200% and include proper care instructions. pcrussell50 has it fairly comprehensivly covered on HB.
    The average consumer isn’t buying their machine based on the possibility they’ll get a new one if it breaks. They’re hoping it works for a long time. The fallibility of machines is on the company that makes them. Part of R&D should be anticipating how the consumer uses it.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by crazyhakins View Post
      The average consumer isn’t buying their machine based on the possibility they’ll get a new one if it breaks. They’re hoping it works for a long time. The fallibility of machines is on the company that makes them. Part of R&D should be anticipating how the consumer uses it.

      Sorry to G Funk for not assisting in your choice .

      Crazyhakins - i don't agree with your R&D comment. A company makes a product, puts out some guidelines and can reasonably expect that the consumer will use the machine as it was fit for purpose. If it isn;t fit for purpose then sure , whinge whine and ask for replacement and money back but if your misuse of the machine has contributed to its demise then you don't have much of a case. If i may use a car analogy; I go into my dealer demanding a new engine, as the one in my car seized after only 3 years and 100 000kms. They ask did i use the specified oil at regular intervals, and i replied i thought the oil cap was sealed for freshness. - (okay i may have exaggerated this for comedic effect)

      What i see in this initial OP question, is the conundrum where this price point is - it is not throw away cheap but even spending good money does not guarantee quality. -so again sorry no help to GFunk.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by FNQ View Post
        i don't agree with your R&D comment. A company makes a product, puts out some guidelines and can reasonably expect that the consumer will use the machine as it was fit for purpose.
        Agreed.... Nevertheless, planned obsolescence keeps the appliance companies in bacon.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by FNQ View Post
          Sorry to G Funk for not assisting in your choice . Crazyhakins - i don't agree with your R&D comment. A company makes a product, puts out some guidelines and can reasonably expect that the consumer will use the machine as it was fit for purpose. If it isn;t fit for purpose then sure , whinge whine and ask for replacement and money back but if your misuse of the machine has contributed to its demise then you don't have much of a case. If i may use a car analogy; I go into my dealer demanding a new engine, as the one in my car seized after only 3 years and 100 000kms. They ask did i use the specified oil at regular intervals, and i replied i thought the oil cap was sealed for freshness. - (okay i may have exaggerated this for comedic effect) What i see in this initial OP question, is the conundrum where this price point is - it is not throw away cheap but even spending good money does not guarantee quality. -so again sorry no help to GFunk.
          FNQ, what exactly are you disagreeing with? I agree with what you just said? Aren’t we saying the same thing? I’m not saying a company has to R&D how a customer might misuse their product (although they should). They should already be somewhat clear on what the average consumer is capable of and aim it at that. There’s no point putting a product out there and having a maintenance schedule that’s beyond the average user. In an attempt to make machines ‘easy to use’ and ‘feature rich’ consumer machines have a whole heap of electronics that increase the risk of failure.

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          • #20
            sorry crazyhawkins, my addled brain misconstrued your meaning. Cheers

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