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Doserless Grinder Mazzer Mini E or Fiorenzato Electronic grinder?

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  • Doserless Grinder Mazzer Mini E or Fiorenzato Electronic grinder?

    I'm looking to get a doserless and stepless grinder for the home. The choices are Mazzer Mini E or a Fiorenzato Electronic.
    Both appeals to me. I like the sexiness of the mazzer but the Fiorenzato and its lcd screen and conical burrs looks like an impressive grinder. My worry is support on the Fiorenzato as it's no where near as common as the Mazzer in Oz.

    Really can't find anything much on the Fiorenzato but according to their website, they'd been in the business longer than Mazzer has. Fiorenzato in the mid 30s and Mazzer in the 50s?

    The Fiorenzato by all specs seems to trump the mini E by a mile. Any one has any idea? Assuming the cost is the same (in fact the Fiorenzato is cheaper) which would you choose? Thanks!

  • #2
    G'day mate.

    Some random thoughts for you:

    they're all just grinders....just....grinders.

    You put beans in the top, and they come out the bottom ground. End of story. Except in the quality of build of the machine built around the plates/ burrs. That is where the difference is (standard of design and build of total machine), and perhaps in the electronic features. I wager all the burrs come from the same maufacturers of burrs.....and for the rest of it they are still all only commercial coffee grinders, and with the kind of use you will put any of these grinders to in home use, they will all be fantastic.

    And in terms of the specs of one trumping another...as i said, they are just coffee grinders, and you will find the important stuff (quality of grind) will be undetectable to yourn palate from one grinder to the next in real terms ( how can you ever know when there are so many other variables in making a cuppa).

    The question is then, how reliable are the electronics of the fiorenzato? The mazzer is a known quantity, as is the macap which would be my own preference ( macap m4D, mxD or m7D or whatever size). And the next question is, will you ever use the programmable electronics?

    Hope that helps.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Fresh_Coffee View Post
      G'day mate.

      ...as i said, they are just coffee grinders, and you will find the important stuff (quality of grind) will be undetectable to yourn palate from one grinder to the next in real terms ( how can you ever know when there are so many other variables in making a cuppa).

      The question is then, how reliable are the electronics of the fiorenzato? The mazzer is a known quantity, as is the macap which would be my own preference ( macap m4D, mxD or m7D or whatever size). And the next question is, will you ever use the programmable electronics?

      Hope that helps.
      Hi, Thanks for the input. What about the whole conical verse flat? Fiorenzato 63mm conical vs mazzer mini 64mm flat? I think that's the thing that I'm worried about is the electronic reliability and cost should anything goes wrong with the electronics. I know they are all just grinders...but there's a large visual element to it too. The look of the macaps do not really appeal to me, there's a certain "softness" to the look compared to the more masculine Mazzer and the Fiorenzato. There's a $215 price difference in favour of the Fiorenzato. Does anyone know about the reliability of the electronics? Cleanability is another factor.

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      • #4
        Others will differ but I dont go the whole conical VS flat thing. Its up to individual prefrence in the end, and flat plates are easier to work with (dont require much bedding in, good coffee straight up). Flat plates dont last as long as conicals so.....you replace them! And then they are again easier to deal with straight up.

        You may find the conical delivers more volume grinds in the same amount of time, than the flats (or you may not depending on the speed of the individual models).

        Its all about speed of delivery in a volume situation, such as doesnt happen at home.

        I dont know anything about the electronics of the fiorenzato offering, but as a brand of grinder its as good as many.

        Ultimately you shouldnt need to worry as long as you trust the source of the guarantee (ie after sales service delivery if required).

        Going again to the macap simply because it is what i like and work with all the time, I can tell you that the electronics in their "electronic" grinders are very very stable, to the point where we have had a small number of cases where they've been filled with condensation due to external reasons, and the grinders kept operating as required without missing a beat,even though the displays didnt come back until all was completely dried spo,me time later. If the fiorenzato is that reliable, it will be a fine grinder.


        Hope that helps.

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        • #5
          Thanks FC,

          I think I'll stick with Mazzer simply because of the sheer overwhelming availability of parts and service and the simpler electronics in the Mini E compared to the complex Fiorenzota. I think it might make more sense in a commercial environment to have the Fiorenzota...although that touch screen looks awfully nice!

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          • #6
            I gotta chime in. Sorry, but if you are brewing filter coffee, manually, grinders do matter from one to the next, and your palate will tell. Some grinders deliver a more uniform and consistent grind than others. Be it at a specific grind coarseness or across the board.

            If you are brewing mostly milk drinks, it's probably not as important.

            I have a Mazzer Mini manual at home, and I love it, but, it produces a pretty poor grind consistency with regards to fines at coarser grind settings (used for filter brewing). It's a $750 grinder (from memory) and at the time it seemed very expensive.

            I find the Mazzer strong, reliable, bulletproof one would seem, it's so stable and a real beast. However. These days, far cheaper grinders can deliver a far superior grind quality than my mini. For example, the Baratza Virtuoso Preciso is around $330 retail and can grind FAR better than a mazzer mini. It's way faster, has far less grind rention (under .4gm) and is far more consistent across the board with regards to grind particle size. Read up on them, I urge you. This unit delivers grinds as good as unit's almost ten times it's price.

            the con? it's not as pretty, probably not as solid, etc.

            I would seriously consider visiting your closest equipment supplier and trialing what is on offer.

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            • #7
              Thanks JamesM,

              It will be specifically for Espresso only. Incidentally there's a difference between the manual and the E on the burr size manual being 58mm and the E being 64mm. I'm under the impression that makes a difference...at least on the speed of grind and the temperature of the grind. Besides, my other grinder is the Obel DSQ grinder with doser which is stepped and I have been using this for both espresso and pour over with good results. It's excellent be able to quickly adjust the grind from coarse to fine but I want a stepless for that in-between without playing with my dose level with fresh beans. Pretty extravagent just for the sake of consistant dosing...but there's still space on the bench!! I did look at the Baratza...but it just looks too plasticky for me.

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              • #8
                Correct, the mini-e has a SJ size burr. Don't get me wrong, they're good grinders. I love my doser mini, however, for less than half the price I know (fact) the Baratza Preciso grinds better (even espresso). They use a Mahlkoenig/Ditting burr. Technology eh...

                From memory, someone was using a Fiorenzato at WBC this year, the live stream (video) showed an absolutely incredible dose/distribution straight out of this grinders spout. It made the K30 look clumpy and slow.

                I have friends who use mini-e's at home and love them. You could also go 2nd hand. You can pick up a major for under $800 these days. If you are keen on Mazzer. Agree they are so popular and parts are easy to find.

                Personally I believe the grinder is more important than the espresso machine. I bought my mazzer when I was still using my sunbeam em6910.

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                • #9
                  What's a good price for a used mini e?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JamesM View Post
                    I gotta chime in. Sorry, but if you are brewing filter coffee, manually, grinders do matter from one to the next, and your palate will tell. Some grinders deliver a more uniform and consistent grind than others. Be it at a specific grind coarseness or across the board..............
                    I have a Mazzer Mini manual at home, and I love it, but, it produces a pretty poor grind consistency with regards to fines at coarser grind settings (used for filter brewing)...........
                    Yes, the MM, & both grinders that the OP is asking about are designed primarily for use in espresso making.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Like Fresh_Coffee said grinders are grinders.. I've had mini mazzer, super jolly, major, compak k3, k6, wega 6.8 konik ( rebadged K10 ) doser less and doser.. I think realistically buy what your going to enjoy looking at everyday. I purchased a manual grinder for my aeropress and ccd so I didn't have to play around with my espresso grinder.

                      I had a major and 2 compak's (k6 and rebadged k10) at the same time and while using the same coffee on my vbm jr, I and my friends couldn't tell the difference especially with milk based drinks.. Even short blacks where just about impossible to tell apart... I now have the rebadged k10, cause I wanted a big conical and a commercial lever at home..

                      Can I taste the difference.. No, do I care, No, because I have what "I" wanted regardless of what others said. So ask questions, read reviews but at this price point >$500 most won't know the difference. You'll get faster grinding, bigger burrs, fancier electronics but hell, at home who cares......

                      You just need to be happy with YOUR decision because in the end it's you using and making the coffee everyday. And remember if you use shit beans regardless of your equipment you'll make shit coffee

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                      • #12
                        Don't worry about the beans side. I like my corretto roasted SOs. Actually I never asked about the effect of taste as much as reliability and servicability. Let's see if I can get a good deal on a used mazzer mini E Doserless.

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                        • #13
                          If you want real reliability, regardless of taste get a mortar and pestle. Enjoy your mazzer

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                          • #14
                            Already have a mortal and pestal...the other thing is it needs to look good on the bench

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                            • #15
                              I'm sure it will

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