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  • Seasoning new grinder burrs.

    Hey

    I've been working as a barista and coffee roaster for a while now and thought I'd pass on a helpful tip for seasoning new grinder burrs. Wearing new blades can be a real pain in the arse, more so in a domestic setting, needing you to pass 5-25kg of coffee through depending on blade type (my experience is mostly with mazzer grinders).
    The trick we used as was passed onto us from our machine mechanic was uncooked rice. Being harder yet still grind-able seasons those blades much faster. we would use 4-5kg for a robur, 2-3kg for a major or a kony and 1-2kg for a SJ or a mini. adjust the grind a few notches courser than usual and give them a good clean afterwards.

    hope that helps

  • #2
    Originally posted by Gustopher View Post
    Hey

    I've been working as a barista and coffee roaster for a while now and thought I'd pass on a helpful tip for seasoning new grinder burrs. Wearing new blades can be a real pain in the arse, more so in a domestic setting, needing you to pass 5-25kg of coffee through depending on blade type (my experience is mostly with mazzer grinders).
    The trick we used as was passed onto us from our machine mechanic was uncooked rice. Being harder yet still grind-able seasons those blades much faster. we would use 4-5kg for a robur, 2-3kg for a major or a kony and 1-2kg for a SJ or a mini. adjust the grind a few notches courser than usual and give them a good clean afterwards.

    hope that helps
    Is this still a good way to season burrs ?

    Comment


    • #3
      From what I've read elsewhere uncooked rice is significantly harder than roasted coffee and is not good for your burrs. If you are seasoning a commercial grade grinder it may work as described above. Putting uncooked rice through a domestic grinder is asking for trouble as the burrs themselves and the parts that hold the burrs won't be anywhere near as strong as a commercial grinder (with a few notable exceptions
      Last edited by level3ninja; 28 January 2019, 08:44 AM. Reason: Autocucumber

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by buderim11 View Post
        Is this still a good way to season burrs ?
        Never found a need to "season burrs" Bud, waste of beans, time, and effort, just go to using them, and make minor adjustments as the sharp edges are knocked off, they will season quick enough.

        Comment


        • #5
          What does “season burrs” mean? Is a grinder like a carbon steel wok? Cast iron like Le Creuset? Does it cook?

          If you are not in commercial setting, I see no particular reason to blunten the burrs to minimise differences from one grind to the next. Passing 25 Kg through a grinder by using it would take me a year or two!

          Instead of using rice, maybe grinding fine gravel would “season” burrs faster. You know it makes sense.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by level3ninja View Post
            From what I've read elsewhere in poked rice ...
            What I want to know is how you poke rice.

            The mind boggles.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lyrebird View Post
              What I want to know is how you poke rice.

              The mind boggles.
              I order it pre-poked and then I just read it

              Comment


              • #8
                This topic was discussed at length a few years back, unfortunately I cant locate the thread.

                The term season was one of the points discussed.

                We all know exactly what is meant by the term, however as discussed previously, a more meaningful term is probably running in or bedding in, I'm sure others will have different opinions.


                Dictionary result for season


                noun
                noun: season; plural noun: seasons
                • 1.
                  each of the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn, and winter) marked by particular weather patterns and daylight hours, resulting from the earth's changing position with regard to the sun.

                  • a period of the year characterized by a particular climatic feature or marked by a particular activity, event, or festivity.
                    "the rainy season"
                    synonyms: period, active period, time, time of year, spell, term, phase, stage "the rainy season"



                  • a fixed time in the year when a particular sporting activity is pursued.
                    "the English cricket season is almost upon us"


                  • the time of year when a particular fruit, vegetable, or other food is plentiful and in good condition.
                    "the pies are made with fruit that is in season"
                    synonyms: available, obtainable, readily available/obtainable, to be had, on offer, on the market, growing, common, plentiful, abundant "strawberries are in season"

                    antonyms: out of season


                  • a time of year traditionally adopted by the English upper classes for a series of fashionable social events.
                    noun: the season


                  • archaic
                    a proper or suitable time.
                    "to everything there is a season"


                  • archaic
                    an indefinite or unspecified period of time; a while.
                    "this most beautiful soul; who walked with me for a season in this world"






                • 2.
                  North American
                  a set or sequence of related television programmes; a series.
                  "the first two seasons of the show"




                • 3.
                  a period when a female mammal is ready to mate.
                  "the bitch can come into season at irregular intervals"





                verb
                verb: season; 3rd person present: seasons; past tense: seasoned; past participle: seasoned; gerund or present participle: seasoning
                • 1.
                  add salt, herbs, pepper, or other spices to (food).
                  "season the soup to taste with salt and pepper"
                  synonyms: flavour, add flavouring to, add salt/pepper to, spice, add spices/herbs to; Moreinformalpep up, add zing to
                  "remove the bay leaves and season the casserole to taste"



                  • add a quality or feature to (something), especially so as to make it more lively or exciting.
                    "his conversation is seasoned liberally with exclamation points and punch lines"
                    synonyms: enliven, leaven, add spice to, enrich, liven up, animate, augment; Moreinformalpep up, add zest/zing to
                    "his albums include standard numbers seasoned with a few of his own tunes"








                • 2.
                  make (wood) suitable for use as timber by adjusting its moisture content to that of the environment in which it will be used.
                  "I collect and season most of my wood"




                Comment


                • #9
                  https://youtu.be/tiqjf8-yuR4

                  tl;dw fresh burrs are so good at cutting beans that they don’t produce the fines required for espresso, and you should keep old coffee for putting through grinders to slightly dull the new burrs. also a refractometer helps to figure out when you’ve put enough coffee through so you take just the right amount off the sharp edge.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    On the other hand the very sharp burrs on my new Vario produce a higher extract than the "seasoned" burrs on my old Sette as measured by my Atago refractometers. It might go up further with "seasoning" but since it is already close to 24% I can't see it going far.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by beensean View Post
                      What does “season burrs” mean? Is a grinder like a carbon steel wok? Cast iron like Le Creuset? Does it cook?
                      It is entirely possible that the answer to all those questions is yes.

                      "Seasoning" iron or steel cookware is the process of coating the iron / steel with unsaturated oil which then oxidatively polymerises in place forming a surface layer which is largely impermeable to oxygen. Since the oils in coffee are also capable of oxidative polymerisation*, it is possible that the same process is responsible for seasoning burrs and all the stuff about dulling the edge is wrong.



                      * This is the source of the varnish like material that accumulates on coffee gear that isn't scrupulously cleaned.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lyrebird View Post
                        * This is the source of the varnish like material that accumulates on coffee gear that isn't scrupulously cleaned.
                        Certainly not on the burrs of any grinder I have owned.

                        The burrs on a coffee grinder don't even approach the temps we see on cookware, a wok in particular, thank goodness.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                          The burrs on a coffee grinder don't even approach the temps we see on cookware, a wok in particular, thank goodness.
                          Oxidative polymerisation will occur at room temperature, it's just a lot faster at high temperatures. I use pure tung oil as the finish on my bikes, it cures by oxidative polymerisation: takes a day or more at 20 odd degrees, can be accelerated by "rubbing in" vigorously enough to heat the contact area.

                          Metal ions can also serve to accelerate the reaction, some of the commercial "tung oil" finishes incorporate this to make them easier to use.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lyrebird View Post
                            Oxidative polymerisation will occur at room temperature, it's just a lot faster at high temperatures. I use pure tung oil as the finish on my bikes, it cures by oxidative polymerisation: takes a day or more at 20 odd degrees, can be accelerated by "rubbing in" vigorously enough to heat the contact area.
                            Perhaps so, however it certainly doesn't occur on grinder burrs.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                              it certainly doesn't occur
                              We can't be certain without testing. It doesn't have to be visible to be there: the surface layer on a seasoned cast iron pan is not apparent to the naked eye.

                              I didn't say that it does occur, just that it could.

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