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Is a Fiorenzato F5 a good grinder ?

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  • Is a Fiorenzato F5 a good grinder ?

    Seems a bit old, when was it made, are they any good, parts obtainable?
    does any one know, oh how does it compares to say Mazzer mini or a Super Jolly? (for comparison or equavalent)

  • #2
    They still make them new, depends how old the version you have or are looking at is.
    But yes similar to a Super Jolly

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Bames View Post
      They still make them new, depends how old the version you have or are looking at is.
      But yes similar to a Super Jolly
      OK, thought it might be closer to a SJ than a MM....but i checked out the guy's feedback of previous trades.....quite shoddy records....and he sells mostly whey protein powders...kind of dumb too, didn't reply to my query whether its stepped or stepless just "all working fine"....so Im giving that a width berth...

      Id keep looking....

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      • #4
        Hugely undervalued grinders. Definitely SJ class.
        very hard to destroy, so if it's a bargain price (they usually are) snap it up.
        i have a FIorenzato Ek 75 auto, with the same 64 mm burr set and it spits 20 gms out in <6 secs
        http://coffeesnobs.com.au/grinders/1...-vs-rocky.html

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        • #5
          there's another one a Quamar M1 Auto going for like NZD 850 brand new...that better??!

          75mm Flat Burrs
          1.5kg Hopper
          Suit Med-High volume Commercial use.

          would be nice if i can fit a Macap's 4 hopper on it...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Grummer View Post
            there's another one a Quamar M1 Auto going for like NZD 850 brand new...that better??!

            75mm Flat Burrs
            1.5kg Hopper
            Suit Med-High volume Commercial use.

            would be nice if i can fit a Macap's 4 hopper on it...
            New !.... Sounds like the deal of the year.....that's practically a M Major E competitor.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by blend52 View Post
              New !.... Sounds like the deal of the year.....that's practically a M Major E competitor.
              except its a manual dosser...just a couple weeks ago, another member bought a black one with an E doser for $950 wish i knew...but i don't like the white...

              Comment


              • #8
                Depends on which way anyone happens to look at this...

                Deal of the year in terms of pricing, if someone is comparing grinders with 75 mm grinding plates. Sure that's cheap.

                But not the deal of the year if someone is comparing grinders with 75 mm griding plates in terms of their expected individual longevity and reliability in medium to high volume cafe use, where my experince tells me to spend more on the tried and proven names....

                But may be a deal of the year if looking to buy a grinder with 75 mm grinding plates for home use....

                That said, what does a grinder with 75 mm grinding plates offer someone in a home use situation, over a quality name brand grinder with smaller more appropriately sized grinding plates (eg 50 to 58mm) for home use?

                In terms of grind quality, I would say nothing, because my experience dictates that you can make an equivalent cup of coffee with a 58 or even 50 mm grinder, as with a grinder with larger, similar design concept grinding plates.

                What does a set of 75 mm diameter grinding plates offer someone in home use, over a grinder with smaller (similar design concept) grinding plates? In my opinion, nothing but faster grinding speed. What about actual grind quality / cup quality? In a properly conducted comparison test....? I bet that once both grinders are dialled in properly and best practice operator technique is employed to make the best coffees possible, you cant pick any signifiant difference in the cup that could be attributed solely to the differing size of the plates.

                If I were looking for a good home use grinder, I would look further than just doing a simple size VS price comparion, because bigger is not necessarily "better" from a grind / cup quality standpoint.

                Bottom line then. Is a 75 mm grinder better to own in a home use situation than a 58 mm grinder, just because it may be bought for a similar price (to a 58 mm grinder)? In a cup quality sense I think not, however individuals should buy whatever they want if it makes them happy ....

                Hope that helps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hi,
                  i really thank you for pointing out factors of burr size/expectation of grind/coffee- in cup quality
                  and the mentality of 'more is better'...just maybe conical burrs might be bit different (I only been member here short time but been reading like a bastard lol)....as it said conicals are better for pure espressos extraction...that i like...I guess I'd give it a miss, although if a quamar conical comes along cheap (hopefully from the same seller) and short hopper...Id hop to it
                  or
                  just be sensible get a Mazzer Mini ~ $500 (thats half of its new RRP)
                  so..
                  now with this introduced talk of conicals here, is this going too far?
                  I have experience with wine, familiar with depth, body, complexity, focuses, aging, and so on, as I am entering the coffee world, I hope to explore as well

                  hmmm
                  I just not sure if a Mazzer Mini would offer me this depth? would it?




                  Originally posted by TOK View Post
                  Depends on which way anyone happens to look at this...

                  Deal of the year in terms of pricing, if someone is comparing grinders with 75 mm grinding plates. Sure that's cheap.

                  But not the deal of the year if someone is comparing grinders with 75 mm griding plates in terms of their expected individual longevity and reliability in medium to high volume cafe use, where my experince tells me to spend more on the tried and proven names....

                  But may be a deal of the year if looking to buy a grinder with 75 mm grinding plates for home use....

                  That said, what does a grinder with 75 mm grinding plates offer someone in a home use situation, over a quality name brand grinder with smaller more appropriately sized grinding plates (eg 50 to 58mm) for home use?

                  In terms of grind quality, I would say nothing, because my experience dictates that you can make an equivalent cup of coffee with a 58 or even 50 mm grinder, as with a grinder with larger, similar design concept grinding plates.

                  What does a set of 75 mm diameter grinding plates offer someone in home use, over a grinder with smaller (similar design concept) grinding plates? In my opinion, nothing but faster grinding speed. What about actual grind quality / cup quality? In a properly conducted comparison test....? I bet that once both grinders are dialled in properly and best practice operator technique is employed to make the best coffees possible, you cant pick any signifiant difference in the cup that could be attributed solely to the differing size of the plates.

                  If I were looking for a good home use grinder, I would look further than just doing a simple size VS price comparion, because bigger is not necessarily "better" from a grind / cup quality standpoint.

                  Bottom line then. Is a 75 mm grinder better to own in a home use situation than a 58 mm grinder, just because it may be bought for a similar price (to a 58 mm grinder)? In a cup quality sense I think not, however individuals should buy whatever they want if it makes them happy ....

                  Hope that helps.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hi there. I was replying to posts 5 and 6 which refer to grinders with grinding plates (flat, planar...), not conical burrs.

                    Only you can decide if you want to spend a mozza on a cafe type grinder with conical burrs. You need to consider also, what you normally drink. Black or milk, given what is occasionally said.

                    One thing that is seldom mentioned, is that people read all this stuff and are encouraged to make choices on equipment based on differences noted in the discussions, as if all this acaedmic stuff is an everyday thing that anyone can understand and pick easily...

                    Take a look at this other thread as it is quite interesting on a similar theme
                    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/grinders/3...vs-k3-m2m.html

                    hope that helps

                    Comment

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