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  • Cheap grinder

    Hey guys - looking to upgrade from my Hario Skerton to an electric grinder. Any suggestions of a cheap robust grinder that would be good for a student?

    Cheers for the advice

  • #2
    Sunbeam EMO 480 usually around the $200 mark.
    You can get it cheaper if you shop around.

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    • #3
      For plunger or filter coffees, the Bodum Bistro Coffee grinder is a neat little burr grinder unit that is a good price around $120 if you can get one. However not good enough for espresso, in which case the Sunbean already mentioned (or better) would be a smarter buy.

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      • #4
        Is the Breville smart grinder worth the extra $50?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Anthorien View Post
          Is the Breville smart grinder worth the extra $50?
          Personally I don't know as I've owned neither. Best to do yourself a bit of research starting here: http://coffeesnobs.com.au/grinders/2...scussions.html

          Various grinders are reviewed.

          GrahamK

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Anthorien View Post
            Is the Breville smart grinder worth the extra $50?
            If you are making espresso, yes.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Anthorien View Post
              Is the Breville smart grinder worth the extra $50?
              I took the plunge just recently and bought one simply to write a review for a website, and also out of curiosity if it would be good for pour overs. It is very small, 10cm smaller than my mazzer mini E. It is also incredibly light. I got a cheeky price on one (I'll PM you).

              It actually surprised me to be honest. It has some great features that are way out of its price range. It needs more cleaning than other grinders I have owned but its not too bad. So easy to adjust timed dose and grind size. You can program several settings too. I am glad I bought it actually. Good invest for this price range.

              P.S, it also fixes the problem with the last model where everyone seemed to need 'shims' to grind fine enough for espresso. I tested it on my Domus Galatea and it worked just fine.

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              • #8
                hi Gonzo, im in the market for a smart grinder too. was going to wait till the after xmas sales but if you know of a bargain now

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                • #9
                  Unfortunately the method I used to get a great deal is no longer available. The price has dropped from the $299 it was at when I bought it by $50-$60. I'll forward you the message I sent Anthorien anyway incase you are interested.

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                  • #10
                    Breville have just produced a new grinder, the BCG600. It is similar to the popular BCG820 smart grinder, with the same conical burr setup but with less electronic controls. It is cheaper than the 820. However it is not yet available in many discount stores.

                    At times the 820 can be bought for about $200. You should be able to twist the arm of store staff to get the BCG600 for well under the list price of $199.

                    I have been using a BCG800 for over three years with great results.

                    Barry
                    Last edited by Barry_Duncan; 3 December 2014, 03:57 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I have bought one of the new Breville grinders, bcg600sil, for a friend. I understand that the internal works are the same as the Breville bcg820 but it doesn’t have an LCG screen . The two adjustments are for fineness and time. It does a great job. It should grind just as well as the Breville Smart Grinders.

                      I got it from Bing Lee for $170.

                      Barry

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                      • #12
                        Hi Anthorian,
                        I have a Baratza Preciso, and have worked with quite a lot of different grinders. It has great burrs, is easy to clean, and is nice and chunky (feels cafe-proof). It's a great grinder if it's within your price range. And I prefer it to the smart grinders, but I always prefer manual control to electronic, which feels like it limits my control of the machine.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by CarlDGreenall View Post
                          Hi Anthorian,
                          I have a Baratza Preciso, and have worked with quite a lot of different grinders. It has great burrs, is easy to clean, and is nice and chunky (feels cafe-proof). It's a great grinder if it's within your price range. And I prefer it to the smart grinders, but I always prefer manual control to electronic, which feels like it limits my control of the machine.
                          I had (note past tense) a Baratza Preciso which I have given up on after less than two years of light use. For the first few months I thought it was great too.
                          But as it got older it had to be constantly re-calibrated and/or shimmed to keep it grinding fine enough. It also needed more and more frequent cleaning or it would clog up. I reckon it would have lasted about three months in a small quiet cafe, and even less in a busy one.

                          The main reason that they feel so"chunky" is that nearly half the total weight of the Preciso is the base plate. The rest of the unit is light and flimsy, but the base is massive, creating the illusion that this machine is much more solid and sturdy than it really is. The phrase "smoke and mirrors" comes to mind here.

                          The burrs may be OK, but the rest of it is rubbish. It broke two upper burr holders, and it was faster to get replacement parts from the USA than from the local distributor in WA.

                          I was attracted by compact size, the "micro adjustment" and low retention features. Both very over-rated in real life. The flex and slop in the plastic parts equates to several clicks of the "Micro adjuster", so it has to be moved about halfway across the scale to achieve any actual change. In reality, it provides a halfway mark between the clicks on the main scale.

                          The low retention feature was no advantage after a while either. As mentioned above, the grinds would back up in the chute and it would retain several grams of ground coffee. Within a week or so, it would clog completely, and would have to be stripped and cleaned.

                          It might have been OK if I was using it to grind coarse for a plunger, but as an espresso grinder, it was a waste of money.

                          I would never buy another Baratza product. Buying one was a mistake. Buying another would be crazy.

                          This, of course, is the cue for Baratza's supporter to leap to their defense, and for their detractors to say "serves you right - I told you so".

                          So fire away chaps ........

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