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  • New Helor 101 Hand Grinder?

    G'day, this is my first post please take it easy on me..

    So it's about time for me to upgrade to a new decent grinder and I found the Helor 101 Hand grinder looks pretty sleek and solid. Even the burrs are interchangeable. I know for the same price I'll get better results from a hand grinder than an electric one.

    I've heard good things about it from Matty D's Blog. Should I go for this one?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Cincono View Post
    G'day, this is my first post please take it easy on me..

    So it's about time for me to upgrade to a new decent grinder and I found the Helor 101 Hand grinder looks pretty sleek and solid. Even the burrs are interchangeable. I know for the same price I'll get better results from a hand grinder than an electric one.

    I've heard good things about it from Matty D's Blog. Should I go for this one?
    For $300 you should be able to get a decent electric grinder (used). So unless you have other reasons for wanting a manual grinder...

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MrJack View Post
      For $300 you should be able to get a decent electric grinder (used). So unless you have other reasons for wanting a manual grinder...
      Having seen one in the metal, they are beautifully executed and offer a good (albeit slower) alternative to the Lido series.

      I can't imagine any $300 electrical- be it new or used getting to within a bulls roar of a precision made hand operated conical. I don't feel the comparison is a valid one.

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      • #4
        Mostly 2 brews a day at home, an electric one seems to be hard to clean?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Talk_Coffee View Post
          Having seen one in the metal, they are beautifully executed and offer a good (albeit slower) alternative to the Lido series.

          I can't imagine any $300 electrical- be it new or used getting to within a bulls roar of a precision made hand operated conical. I don't feel the comparison is a valid one.
          So their biggest advantage is being perfectly aligned with burrs? since their body is made of one piece metal. Does this improve the consistency?

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          • #6
            In addition to these, an aluminium alloy unibody design improves the stiffness of the entire grinder body as compared to plastic made bodies. The shape of the grinder remains even if it endures certain dropping or pressing.
            This is what I found on their website. commercial link removed per Site Posting Policy
            Is Lido made of plastic? Also, I'm not too sure about the advantage of metal burrs over ceramic ones?
            Last edited by Javaphile; 31 July 2016, 02:58 PM. Reason: Commercial Link(s) Removed

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            • #7
              It's a case of buy whichever top end conical burr hand grinder you prefer the look of. The grind quality will be identical. The rest- marketing faff.

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              • #8
                Interesting grinder that Helor! I haven't seen it before, but looks nice and the construction looks promising.

                Originally posted by Cincono View Post
                Is Lido made of plastic? Also, I'm not too sure about the advantage of metal burrs over ceramic ones?
                The Lido grinders are made of metal where it's not transparent, the transparent parts are either glass or plastic depending on whether you're looking at the Lido II or Lido III.

                Both the Helor and Lido use metal burrs, I believe the ceramic part of the Helor is only the bearings that the central shaft runs through.

                I own a Lido III and I personally found that for filter brews, no electric grinders my brother or myself have owned come anywhere close (we've owned Mazzer Mini, Major, Kony and a Breville Smart Grinder - might have missed some cheaper ones in between)

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                • #9
                  Great to see hand grinders of this calibre being manufactured right here in Oz.

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                  • #10
                    Manufactured, no. Designed and assembled, yes! I have one, and it's a bloody nice bit of kit. The aluminium 'unibody' construction and general simplicity / aesthetic is very much in the line of Jony Ive / Apple which I have no problem with! Nice heft but not heavy, beautifully machined.

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                    • #11
                      Is it even designed and assembled in Oz? From the English bits that I've gleaned from https://www.kaffee-netz.de/threads/h...e.95385/page-4 it seems to be a Chinese product all the way.

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                      • #12
                        Well all I know is it was handed to me by one of the designers who lives not far from my workshop in Melbourne. Most of the components are made in China and I understand the burrs are Italian. I can't see the country of origin as very important - Orphan Espresso for example also contract to a Chinese manufacturer, as does the vast majority of designers who want to get their product off the drawing board. The quality is there in spades and there is clearly a good level of support. Ticks all my boxes!

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                        • #13
                          I had a quick look at Rick's grinder and fwiw, it looked pretty good to me....

                          On OE and direct from the keyboard of Barb via email late last week...
                          "You may already know that OE has left our old production facility and started a new factory in Taichung City, Taiwan to produce our products."

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                          • #14
                            ahh well there you go. In many industries Taiwanese manufacturing certainly has a better rep than Chinese, but like anything you gets what you pays for, and Chinese made is no longer justifiable as a byword for inferiority.

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                            • #15
                              IMO china as a byword for inferiority is a bit of a selection bias for the fact that anything good coming out of there tends not to be mentioned or picked up. i mean, how often does one question where something is made in when it works well. usually just assume its made in a reputable country and leave it at that. where you usually find yourself looking for the origin country when its a piece of crap hardware or stop working. and to add to that, proceed to complain about it somewhere

                              looks like a great product! if only i didn't bite on the lido II (which, dont get me wrong is a great piece of kit.. but every now and then i find myself wishing some of the very minor kinks were worked out before i bought one) so early on....

                              it appears the concept of the design is similar to the hario slim/porlex idea but with massive improvements where it counts

                              Originally posted by Cincono View Post
                              So their biggest advantage is being perfectly aligned with burrs? since their body is made of one piece metal. Does this improve the consistency?
                              one piece means less play between parts which was the problem with the hario slim/porlex. The burrs wouldnt sit anchored to anything else and resulted in play between top and bottom burr which gave an inconsistent grind - especially for filter grinds. i recall a couple of times where no matter how coarse or fine i made my grind it would still results in a very similar pour time... right until it got way too coarse and just gushed.

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