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R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

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  • R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

    Back in November last year, instead of doing the sensible thing and relegating my broken Aldi popper to the rubbish bin, I tried to fix it. I used epoxy resin to reconnect the plastic fan to its metal motor shaft.

    Im pretty sure I hadnt given it a run since --until today. I wanted to do a quickie roast of the new El Salvador San Adelaida beans.

    Placed 100 grams into the popper, and within seconds chaff spewed out. But there was barely any movement of the beans, so I agitated with a wooden spoon.

    Within 2 minutes, some cracking and the odd oily bean would show itself among the green-yellow mass.

    Then an ominous noise -- and I dont mean second crack. No more fan.

    And so I said goodbye to the Aldi popper, and to 100 grams of beans.

    At least my lack of faith in epoxy resins is reaffirmed.

    So its back to the reliable barbecue --- well, not right now. Theres a kilo of big red peppers being roasted as we speak.


    Unlike coffee beans, they dont make their own oil, so theyll be doused with extravirgin olive oil and a little salt as I rest them for 24 hours.

    Robusto

  • #2
    Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

    Id love to see a few of these generic poppers (Aldi, B&D, Mistral, Chief, MaitreD, etc) torn down to see if there was any difference between them internally...

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

      I agree. Mistral and Chief are divisions of the same company (Gerrard Industries), and they all look identical enough on the outside, let alone the inside.

      Strong fans in those buggers though. I do 160grams as a standard batch and reckon I could go 170g without too much drama on my Mistral branded version. (stirring assist required for first couple mins)

      And lay off the the epoxy resins too.... I work in that industry and all the best high performance composites for aerospace and formula one, racing yachts, racing canoes etc are made from carbon and kevlar fibres impregnated with epoxy resins ;D In the composites industry epoxies are the Rolls Royce of the resins with a price to match.

      Data sheet makes no claims on suitablitly for repairing coffee poppers though

      Cheers...




      Comment


      • #4
        Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

        One thing is consistent with all of these poppers. Plastic in the fan mechanism. Even a tiny bit of aluminium or tin would suffice better than plastic. It seems like they have built-in obsolesence. After so many batches of popcorn they will more than likely fail as well.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

          Sorry to take you up on this, Lochness, but you have hit a raw nerve with epoxies.  Like superglue, I have NEVER known an epoxy resin which did its intended job.   It has ALWAYS failed to glue together two materials or seal a hole, crack etc.....all those little jobs around the home for which its designed to do.

          Using the substance as a  construction material for boats etc is another matter, where the resin is essentally sticking to itself or enveloping wooden and other materials.   It is also reinforced with glass fibre, and in that situation we are talking about buckets of the stuff instead of a few drops for domestic use  where invariably the broken article is plastic because everything is made of plastic and everything that is made of plastic breaks and nothing sticks permanently to the stuff apart from solvents used in PVC plumbing which arent exactly suitable for everyday repairs.


          There, got that off my chest.  ;D    Now for some coffee roasting.
          Robusto

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

            IMHO Heat kills most epoxies, there are however ones more tolerant.

            The bad news is that they are not generally available to the unwashed masses in small quantities. I have used some that have done the job quite well, preperation will help.

            FWIW the Cyanoacrylate glues my mechanic uses are $30-45 per small bottle, stored in the fridge, and have a limited shelf life, and are not to be confused with the 6 for $1 blister packs at Crazy Clarks or Bunnings.

            I would have tried to rough up the surface of the Shaft and also the fan hole, maybe even drilled a hole and put a split pin through or a grub screw.

            FWIW 2, the PVC plumbing solvents also give way under heat..

            and on that bright note ill take my leave

            Tepin

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

              Quite right,  Tepin, Im sure the heat would not have helped. Still, there wasnt much left of the fan boss to attach to anything. I tried to fashion a new one with the resin -- to no avail.


              Even so, without the heat it may have lasted a little longer but in the end it doubtless would have failed too.


              (But hey, Im not exactly grieving! The whole thing was only $14 -- and you cant expect a life time of service for that. Hard to justify $40 for super-resin to fix a $14 appliance, too)

              Robusto

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                Id have Tried as I have a Extensive Glue Collection. "Most Purloined from Mates"

                Call it frugality if you like,
                I have also been known to avail myself of the services of a Retired Marine Engineer With a Lathe,

                Armourer of our Pistol Club,,

                A Cask of Chateau De Cardboard Vib Ordinaire and he is mine,

                and If its Technical well its a Bottle of a Mates Home Distilled Bourbon..

                Tepin
                As an Aside Id like to try some Epoxy mixed with Ceramic Dust in a similiar application

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                  Hi All,

                  Regarding the use of anaerobic adhesives (super-glues et al), you might like to visit a reputable Hobby Shop that specialises in R/C Aircraft, especially large ones. There are a number of suppliers to this market niche who produce some pretty awesome C/A adhesives, some of which are able to withstand significant heat stress. Might be worth a try ,

                  Cheers,
                  Mal.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                    You mean they dont use Tarzans Grip for model aeroplanes anymore? Theyve moved on?   Hee Hee.

                    Robusto

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                      think i used Aquadhere on mine..
                      Tepin

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                        Most epoxies, especially commerical ones will have a low service temperature when they are cured at room temperature - maybe in the order of 40-50 deg C if you are lucky. After that they will become too soft and lose too much strength. For aerospace applications I usually have to chose an epoxy to suit a particluar application and sometimes you need to trade strength for higher service temperature etc.

                        Even then the high strength room temp curing epoxies will have a service temp of 70-80 deg and will have lost maybe 75% of their strength by then. You can increase the service temp a little by curing at a higher temperature or post curing the epoxy which means to heat it up after it has initially cured. Most epoxies used in aerospace to make serious bits are cured at around 100 deg or up to 180-250 deg for high temp applications.

                        Longn short of it is that if the fan gets hot it aint going to stand a chance. For broken bits of plastic an epoxy may not be the best adhesive, it would be better to repair it by using some fibreglass/epoxy mix and encasing it. Repairing broken bits of plastic with 2 minute epoxy never works for me either - case in point when my 18 month old boy handed me one half of my glasses this morning

                        Cheers,

                        Matt

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                          Interesting information, Matt. I think that for domestic application, the rule of thumb is: if its made of plastic and it breaks, chuck it out. Any repair with adhesive will be usightly (as in the use of body filler) or short term with discrete epoxies.

                          Robusto

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: R.I.P.  Aldi Popper

                            Had a Post Lost in Space ..
                            trying to remember It ..
                            Was Sober then..

                            //
                            Not Always Robusto ..
                            I Play with Epoxies and Diatomecious Earth/ Like to get some powdered Ceramics to Play with/ also Metalic Powders (Obscure) that is /Car Bog has Talc in it -- Not a Really good Binder ,Just a Filler..
                            Tepin

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