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Sourcing a rotisserie

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  • Sourcing a rotisserie

    Anyone know where to source a BBQ rotisserie motor with at least 40 RPM?  Seems most shop rotisseries are about 6 RPM.  I know some have used a wind sheild wiper motor or a paint stirring mechanism, but I was just looking for something that wouldnt require any engineering.

    Thanks,
    Matt

  • #2
    Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

    Originally posted by MatthewG link=1164400565/0#0 date=1164400565
    Anyone know where to source a BBQ rotisserie motor with at least 40 RPM? Seems most shop rotisseries are about 6 RPM. I know some have used a wind sheild wiper motor or a paint stirring mechanism, but I was just looking for something that wouldnt require any engineering.

    Thanks,
    Matt
    Sorry but Ive never even heard of any ready-made BBQ rotisserie motor coming anywhere close to 40rpms. :-/


    Java "Time for a project!" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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    • #3
      Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

      MattewG,
      Where have you tried so far? Ive been to a few bigger BBQ places that sell Spits to see if I can purchase just the motor, which they wont. Unfortunately, the suppiers of the motors (VIKING) on said spits dont have a web site. Ive sent a few email questions out to some US spit makes asking about 240V convert and putting a variable pot on it to manipulate the speed.
      No luck so far.
      Might have to investigate a local manufacture, if it turns out ok, we could place a bulk order...

      Boris

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      • #4
        Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

        Theres a guy near me that sells the occasional home made spit BBQ.
        He has one out on the street atm.
        I could stop and ask him about motor speed and availability.

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        • #5
          Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

          Well Ive investigated a bit further. No luck. A sparky friend recommended contacting an electrical motor mob who have these sorts motors. They do but none with variable speed, a straight foward single speed rotisserie (6RPM) 240v is about $A250.00. He said there was no way you could put in a speed controller because you would lose power. He could build one using a 3 phase set up for about a $A1000.00. Ill keep looking. Off to a BBQ place later today.

          Boris

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          • #6
            Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

            What power level is needed? Would a sewing machine motor suffice?
            These of course come with a speed controller. I dragged a couple out
            of my wifes spare parts supply (she has 30 machines), small ones,
            240V at 0.5A. Old s/m motors are pretty easy to come by.

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            • #7
              Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

              A sewing machine motor will have plenty of power (as will most small motors) but the speed will be far too fast....

              They all will require gearing.... either with real gears or pulley system to reduce the rotational speed (and increase the torque at the same time)....

              Rotisserie motors - designed to rotate kg of meat etc are all going to be FAR too slow (they need to be slow so the meat browns and also so that there is enough torque to rotate that amount of weight - which generally wont be balanced on the spit)....

              I think you will need to do some engineering to get what you want - or pay heaps to get something which is a special "one off" - which is one of the reasons coffee roasters cost so much - they use similar - but unique - components to other devices which sell for far less. Often they use worm gears to reduce the motor speed.

              Small motors with variable speed - and a SM motor would be ideal - are cheap and readily available..... just get yourself some gears or a pair of pulleys and a belt..... and you will be in business....

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              • #8
                Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                "A sewing machine motor will have plenty of power (as will most small motors) but the speed will be far too fast.... "

                They can (with a good controller) be made to go arbitrarily slowly, for
                a length of time. Ive seen it done. Whether or not it would then
                have the required torque Im not sure about. Might work if its
                only going to drive beans rather than half a cow.

                These motors are often set up to attach a belt easily.

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                • #9
                  Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                  I might be a bit late with this but I just got back from Kmart where they had Jackaroo brand rotiserie kits (motor and shaft etc) for $79.

                  As for the sewing machines going slow with control of the pedal, I can vouch for that and have never noticed any change in torque (yes I can sew).

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                  • #10
                    Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                    Originally posted by Thundergod link=1164400565/0#8 date=1165643551
                    I
                    As for the sewing machines going slow with control of the pedal, I can vouch for that and have never noticed any change in torque (yes I can sew).
                    Yep they go slow but most have either a belt from a small wheel on the shaft of the motor to a much bigger wheel on the main drive (older style) - or an internal gear train.... the motor turns relatively fast even when the pedal is barely on.

                    You would need to "transplant" both the motor AND the reduction mechanism - which could be done- especially with the older belt drive machines.

                    There is also an "easy" way to get a considerable speed reduction - anyone who is old enough to remember the old vinyl record players will know what I mean

                    You take a large wheel - say about 15cm in diameter with a rubber tyre and fit it to the shaft you are trying to turn..... (must be heat proof- not plastic - if the shaft is going to get hot)

                    You take the motor and mount it so the shaft of the motor is parallel to the shaft on the main wheel and it rubs against the rubber tyre- generally pulled towards the tyre with a spring....

                    Now if the shaft on the motor is 5mm and the large wheel is 150 mm you have a reduction of 30:1- or for 40 RPM on the main shaft the motor will be turning at 1200 RPM..... and there are plenty of motors which will do that.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                      I saw a vinyl record player too today at Kmart.

                      Youre also describing how bicycle gears work (ratio wise) for those who can picture that instead.

                      The little wheel turns fast and the big wheel turns slower.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                        "you would need to "transplant" both  the motor AND the reduction mechanism - which could be done- especially with the older belt drive machines. "

                        Yes, that would be true -- not too expensive, but away from the original
                        criterion of not needing engineering. As they say, theres no free lunch

                        I have a couple of those idler wheel turntables. A Garrard 401, and a
                        Lenco. The 401 performs superbly, very little rumble even with a pretty
                        average plinth (plinth design is the key to success with these tt/s).
                        Unfortunately the rather idiosyncratic Lenco arm has a small piece
                        missing and I cant find a replacement.  Bummer.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                          Originally posted by Thundergod link=1164400565/0#3 date=1165025465
                          Theres a guy near me that sells the occasional home made spit BBQ.
                          He has one out on the street atm.
                          I could stop and ask him about motor speed and availability.
                          Finally spotted another BBQ for sale so I stopped to suss it out.

                          Unfortunately the guys an old Greek bloke that speaks little English so I was forced to speak Greek to him (drats).

                          He told me motors in Australia were too slow.
                          I agreed that was what my friend who was looking for a motor had told me.
                          He tells me he gets his from Germany.
                          Then he went to get one from his garage to run for me so I could work out the speed.
                          Well no need as it said on the box "20RPM".
                          Next question, "How much"?
                          Answer after a short pause..."$240".

                          So thats the deal, hefty looking motor that will rotate a lamb - 20RPM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                            I use an old windscreen wiper motor attached to a battery charger. Got it for free from a mate but he reckons they would be around $10-$30 from a wrecker.

                            We did a rough estimate on RPMs at one of the roasting days and reckon its about 50RPM.

                            Been going for over 2 years now.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Sourcing a rotisserie

                              Options to vary speed for a 12 volt wiper motor and 240 volt AC motor,

                              Jaycar electronics have a 10 amp 12 VDC motor speed controller for around $23.95 ( kit KC-5225). By adding an extra MOSFET transistor it will double the output capacity to 20 amps, I have used this kit to run and dim my 12 volt garden (6 amps) lights, has worked a treat for a couple of years now without any problems.
                              The other option is you can get a device called a VSD ( variable speed drive) they are available in various sizes. By using a pot, you can vary the speed of a 240 Volt single phase or 415 volt three phase A.C induction motor, you can even get them with a 240 Volt single phase input to 415 Volt three phase output, you can configure them to run at a max speed, min speed, ramp up, ramp down or anything in between . I have seen some good cheap ones on Evil bay. Hope this will help.

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