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  • Heat Gun Power

    How important is the heatgun power when roasting with a bread maker? I have just smoked my 2000W Ryobi and replaced it with a 1500W Makita. With my Ryobi I can roast about 500gm in 16-18mins. I tried to use my Makita tonight doing the standard 500gms and after 25mins I didnt reach 1st crack and the beans still looked a long way off being done so I stopped the roast. Is this the heatgun or my beans? Can the heatgun power make that much difference? I am a little stumped. :-?

  • #2
    Re: Heat Gun Power

    Id imagine not just the power, but the distance from the beans would affect the roast times. Assuming the Ryobi and Makitas convert their watts to heat output with the same efficiency, the Makita puts out 25 per cent less heat.

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    • #3
      Re: Heat Gun Power

      I use a Ryobi and the time of the roast is controlled by the distance of the gun from the beans, If your Makita is less powerful you would probably need to apply the heat closer to the beans and monitor your temps with a datalogger.

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      • #4
        Re: Heat Gun Power

        The little Black & Decker HG I use is only rated at 1,600W output maximum and I manage to do 900g roasts with it ok. So, as Robusto and gm has mentioned, maybe you just need to move the HG a little closer. Try it with smallish batches first so you dont end up wasting a heap of beans .

        Cheers ,
        Mal.

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        • #5
          Re: Heat Gun Power

          As I got more impatient with the roast, I did end up putting the heat gun down to only 3-4 cms off the beans. I have also realised that the beans I had been roasting may have been at least 2-3 years old. How does that impact on the roast??

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          • #6
            Re: Heat Gun Power

            If youve stored the beans properly, i.e. inside a natural fibre bag, in a cool, dark, well ventilated space then they should still be ok. I guess a quick check could be, that they still have a nice clean, grassy, straw sort of smell without any mustiness about them.

            Beans can still be used at up to 3 years after processing if all the above criteria are being met. I guess the results will speak for themselves, in the cup.... Id let that be your guide Lez ,

            Mal.

            P.S.
            With my Corretto setup and when large batches are being roasted, my B&D HG is adjusted so that it sits about 75mm above the top of the beans. As batches get smaller, the HG is raised incrementally depending on the batch size.

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            • #7
              Re: Heat Gun Power

              Thanks Mal - I have stored the beans as you mentioned and they dont appear to be musty at all, so maybe that rules out a bean problem. When I used my Ryobi 2000W I was able to use a similar method as you described by lifting the HG as the roast progresses and had no problems but the Makita was just not able to operate in the same way. Maybe the HG is no good. Ill try to get another one and see if that makes a difference.

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