Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

popper vs pro roasteries

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • popper vs pro roasteries

    hi all,
    I am on the verge of plunging head first into roasting (I roast beans and my lovely roasts me) ;D. im in the final year of my doctorate so am time-poor and $ poor. the first poorness leads to me logically buy roasted, but the second poorness leads to me home roasting.
    i have a popper already with bean-rotating vents, not burny burny blow up bottom vents.

    i guess my question is, if I only go with the basic setup (no thermocouple etc) of air roasting, will i be able to achieve beans that will taste ANYTHING at all like a retail roaster? im not expecting venezianno for example, but ive been to other roasters where i regret my purchases.

    thanks all and also lucinda and TG for your thread and input on beggining popper roasting!!

    aaron

  • #2
    Re: popper vs pro roasteries

    aaron the resultant roasts are nothing to be ashamed of.
    I never used a thermocouple with my popper and dont see the need considering most poppers arent moded to allow for any control over heat or fan.
    Youll hear FC even if you dont see it coming with a temperature readout.
    Youll notice smoke just before you hear SC, again without a thermometer.

    Go or it!
    Its easy.


    P.S. You can always PM or email me any questions.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: popper vs pro roasteries

      Hi Aaron,

      Youre welcome to bring your home roasts by Veneziano on a Saturday and we can run them head to head with ours if youd like. Just PM me at this username or the Veneziano username in advance so that I can grab an extra grinder.

      Depending on how much coffee you use in a week, you might find that heat gun/breadmaker or heatgun/dogbowl is a more efficient roasting method. If it interests you, I think that I still have my GMC heatgun sitting around somewhere - you could borrow it or buy it or have it or something.

      I started home roasting a while back, gave up and used the sample roaster at work - I really wasnt methodical enough to learn how to do it decently. Im now trying again with a gene cafe, which at least takes some of the variables out of it. Im probably not a good person to talk to about home roasting, but I suspect that its just like espresso - you need to be methodical about learning how to roast. I have been doing many different roasts of the same bean and cupping them against each other. It would probably be a good idea to start off with a nice large and relatively nondescript wet processed bean. That way, you can attribute flavour changes to your technique rather than wondering if its to do with the bean that you are using. Something like a colombian supremo or an indian tiger mountain would be a good start. I have a colombian supremo and a brazil natural at the moment. I also bought a notebook as a roast and cupping log and I have a lazy susan to help me do some blind triangle cupping. I think that my roasts have improved very quickly!

      With the gene, it takes about an hour to get about 600g roasted. At the moment, it more or less requires my full attention, but presumably this will dwindle down later. You know what greens cost and you know what your time is worth to you, as well as how difficult or easy it is for you to buy brown coffee, so hopefully that can help you to evaluate the relative merits.

      Hope that helps,

      Luca

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: popper vs pro roasteries

        hey luca

        thanks for your reply and your generous offers.
        the BIGGEST thing holding me back at the moment is my dearest, who will most likely hire a divorce lawyer (no, actually, she wouldnt - she would rather stay with me FOREVER and just NAG me until i die...no, not really - she is actually wonderful). but i think i need to work the $ angle.

        i consume ~250-300gms p.w.

        ill have to decide if this goes ahead. if i do, then i think ill start with popper roasting and see where that takes me. would then love to compare with your brown beans at veneziano, but being a jew who observes the sabbath, that makes saturdays out unfortunately, but many thanks anyway. maybe another day?

        and re the heatgun, again thanks VERY much. ill say no at the moment, but ill definitely keep the offer in mind should i go the breadmaker route.

        cheers

        aaron

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: popper vs pro roasteries

          Aaron,
          Ive compared my home roasted Kenya AA (popper) with a couple of commercial Kenya AA roasts (from good places) and the popper roast doesnt make it. Its not bad, its just not as good as a well-controlled roast, so Im looking at either a coretto or a Gene Cafe.
          While the corretto would be cheaper, it is also more work each time and that may be the decider for me.
          Good luck with your experiments and keep us up-to-date.
          Greg

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: popper vs pro roasteries

            Aaron, the best way to find out whether or not popper roasts are to your
            liking is to try it. We started with a popper plus chimney over the kitchen sink;
            now its a GeneCafe. Popper roasts are pretty small so experiments arent too
            expensive The results wont be the same as a pro roaster, but that doesnt
            necessarily mean you wont like it. I would agree with Greg though that Kenya AA
            is not a good place to start; IMHO that is a bean that needs careful treatment
            especially when used as espresso (Im still trying).

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: popper vs pro roasteries

              Kenya is a very hard origin to start with! I agree with Lucas comments regarding starting on a nondescript Colombian Supremo or Brazil Santos.

              Aaron, youre always welcome at the First Pour, just make sure its in the arvo some time so we can actually chat....were so busy in the mornings now we need 2 people running the espresso bar...one on milk and taking orders, the other on shots!

              Come in....grab some Colombian.....its not that hard! Maybe it is, my first ever roast at home was a Yirga Cheffe and it was a disaster....it looked like my house was on fire from down the street! HAH! Then again, that was me being me, gung ho, just doin it and having no clue what was going on. With some guidance and plenty of home roasting experience on this website, you cant go wrong!

              Cheers,

              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                Aarron, have a read here if you havent already. http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1174699442

                You do not need a thermocouple, I certainly didnt when I started out. I found it handy later on though. If you follow this guide you will find it easy. You just need to keep an ear and an eye on the roast.

                Using a popper is probably the easiest way to start as it is hands free.

                It is a bit daunting to start with, but once you start you will never look back.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                  thanks everyone...seems that the consensus is GO FOR IT...
                  i do fee lwelcome at veneziano dave so thanks! perhaps next timei pop in, itll be for green, not brown??? or maybe ill buy the same blend in green and brown and compare tastes b/w what you guys do, and what i could do (obvious winner here folks...) but still to get an idea anyway.

                  actually now that i think about it, should i roast SOs only? i think i have read here that its GENERALLY better to roast SOs individually, and THEN blend. is that right generally?

                  cheers all

                  aaron

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                    Start with SOs and if you want to blend, blend them post roast.




                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                      thanks lucinda!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                        ive got an i-mex which is quite cheap to start with (bought it from one of the CS member).
                        But the machine is very noisy. To be hornest, I still cant 100% hear the cracks. So Im still working on it.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                          Originally posted by roknee link=1203898555/0#3 date=1203909785
                          hey luca

                          i consume ~250-300gms p.w.

                          Hi Aaron,

                          From both a $ & time perspective, a 2nd hand BM, a GMC HG and a Drilling stand (to mount the HG) could see you getting away with spending as little as $60 (the last two can be purchased at Bunnings from $25 and $10 respectively).  For this price, youll have a Corretto Roaster which will give you fantastic control, a very good depth of flavour and an excellent degree of evenness in your roasts, AND youll be able to reduce your roasting to once every fortnight (ie: you could comfortably roast one batch of 600 grams every time, which would yield ~500 grams brown).

                          Food for thought and good luck

                          -Alchemist-

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: popper vs pro roasteries

                            I back up Alchemist on the Corretto Aaron, I started with a popper and was getting ok roasts but they were over in 5-6 minutes, I eventually killed the popper from trying to do 5 consecutive roasts. I then set up Corretto -- 2nd hand Breville bm $40 (Im sure you could get one cheaper), Ryobi hg $46 Bunnings, cooling fan $10 Bunnings, cooling rack with aluminium mesh screen (components $6 Bunnings) adjustable stand for heatgun (kerbside pickup)--so for $100 I was up and running, I noticed a marked improvement immediately with more control over my roasts and with great advice from CSers was turning out very good roasts. Since then I have added a DMM datalogger (from Andy) which has enabled me to have full control over my roasts and a greater understanding of the whole roasting process. I usually to 600g batches which gives me 500g brown.
                            Whichever way you decide to go--happy roasting, you will get a lot of satisfaction out of it!!
                            cheers
                            greenman

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X