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experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

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  • #16
    Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

    Wow this looks awesome and excellent work.....so where do I sign up for my order

    *starts having dreams of circuit diagrams and dis-used soldering iron*

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    • #17
      PIC code

      For those of you mad enough to try and build one of these, here is
      the PIC code in source and hex formats:

      http://samba.org/tridge/pyRoast/pic-source.asm
      http://samba.org/tridge/pyRoast/pic-code.hex

      As I mentioned previously, only attempt this if you have appropriate
      qualifications and experience for working with 240v circuits! This
      is not a circuit for amateurs.

      Cheers, Tridge


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      • #18
        Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

        Thanks for keeping us posted on your experiments Tridge.
        It looks to be a great system and I am looking forward to the next update.

        Perhaps you know already but it is really easy to add multiple thermocouple channels directly to a PIC using the Max6675 chips.
        Perhaps a monitor of the heater output temperature or ambient might be useful ? Always fun to have more numbers to play with.

        Cheers, Andrew.

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        • #19
          chocolate truffles!

          Ive now adapted the power control box and pyRoast for making
          chocolate truffles. My wife is delighted :-)

          See http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1263085051 for the details.

          Cheers, Tridge

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          • #20
            Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

            Hi Tridge -

            Have you considered cracking open the HG and hacking it to control the fan and heating element separately?

            This could help with the overheating issue you described - keep the fan at a relatively high speed, while lowering the temperature of the heating element. Although maybe this would put too much cool air over the beans?

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            • #21
              Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

              Now ya have to move on the the Turbo oven! ;D

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              • #22
                Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

                Originally posted by 72765049494C53444B250 link=1259627839/20#20 date=1269365262
                Now ya have to move on the the Turbo oven!
                I second that.... KKTO limited edition with auto power control...

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                • #23
                  Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

                  Hi all

                  Just a heads up for those interested in the nexus of coffee and Linux. Andrew Tridgell will be speaking as usual at the Linux Conference this week but this time it will be about using "Penguin powered coffee!"
                  https://conf.linux.org.au/programme/schedule/view_talk/95?day=friday

                  Shame my wife and I are missing the Linux Conf this year. Its in Brisbane and hopefully all will go very well for the organisers and the attendees.

                  Mike

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                  • #24
                    Re: experiments in auto-power control for a Corretto

                    Hi

                    Just saw the video, very cool. Has there been any more development on this?

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                    • #25
                      Thank you Tridge for your work on pyRoast.

                      I have used a modified (hacked!) version to control a 'KKTO-like' roaster. I used a USB thermocouple and a USB relay (which operates a second 240V relay) to control the heat. It's only on-off... or 0 / 100% power. But it works.

                      This afternoon it succesfully followed a roast profile (that I had to make up based on a previous roast). Next step is to have it roast without a profile but with an estimated first crack temp (eg full heat till say 30 degrees below estimated first crack temp, then slow the temperature change... till say 2 degrees below estimated first crack temp then slow the temp change more till say 10 degrees above estimated first crack.... then maybe sound an alarm to say it's time to turn it off?

                      I took a screen shot (which will show that I still have some 'tweaking' to do) but I don't know how to load the photo to this post without using a URL?

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                      • #26
                        I tried pasting the screenshot
                        green is the target profile (which I fabricated)
                        red is the actual roast.

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                        • #27
                          I stumbled onto your YouTube video, your roasting program is outstanding. Is this available to download? I dont seem to see the link.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by roastedright View Post
                            I stumbled onto your YouTube video, your roasting program is outstanding. Is this available to download? I dont seem to see the link.

                            Morning RR, Welcome to Coffee Snobs.

                            This is a pretty old thread, the last post to it was about 5 years ago, most who have posted are are no longer around.

                            May help to start a new thread in the home roasting forum asking specific questions.

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