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Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

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  • Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

    Hi, as Im new to this roasting activity Im compiling from a variety of sources a bit of a guide to help me to learn to drive my popper roaster. There seems to be some contradictory info around so I would appreciate any suggestions or corrections etc on these tables. I hope that they can help others starting out too. thanks.

    Roast Temp / Level
    Stage Probe Temp Level

    First Crack 205C (401F) cinnamon
    Rolling First Crack 212C (415F) half city
    First Crack End 218C (426F) city
    223C (435F) city +
    228C (444F) full city
    Second Crack 234C (454F) full city +
    Rolling Second Crack 240C (465F) vienna - light french
    ?? italian
    245C (474F) full french
    252C (486F) spanish

    Roast Style Characteristics
    Level Surface Varietal Acidity Body Aroma Sweetness

    cinnamon dry peak peak medium high low
    city dry high high high high medium
    full city slight oil high high high peak medium
    vienna slight oil medium medium peak peak high
    italian shiny low low peak high peak
    full french very shiny very low very low medium medium medium
    spanish very shiny very low very low low medium low

  • #2
    Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

    I would not rely on these figures. They appear to be a little high from my experience as First Crack usually occurs before 200 degrees on the roasters I have used or observed. Some roasters will go into FC at greater than 200.

    The timing and temperature of FC and SC depend very much on the roaster, thermometer (or DMM) and temperature probe. Add to this, of course, the ambient conditions and the type of bean. Then there is the coffee drinkers (ie you) preferences for the roast profile of a certain bean type

    When I started out on a popper, I tried measuring temp but found it was not that useful; you should rely on sound and appearance to judge when to stop the roast. Also, look for a way to drop the temperature to extend the time between FC and SC. I used a fan blowing across the top.

    Its been said often enough but the real proof is what you find in your own trial and error. If you are serious about developong a good profile, I would suggest graduating to a roaster which provides better heat control. The corretto is usually the next step for many CSers, or try for something like the Genecafe or HotTop or the Behmor.

    In the meantime, as the popper has a small batch size, try roasting one bean type for a while but to different roast depths. These would be based on stopping the roast according to occurrence of second crack and work out which one suits your taste. Record this info.

    Be mindful that the lack of proper heat control on a popper means that you may not get the best from the bean. Hard beans usually benefit from a slower roast profile.

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    • #3
      Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

      AAARRGGGHHH

      You need to roast Full City + Vienna - Italy + French - Spanish and a little village somewhere in another non coffee growing region.

      ;D

      Please, please... just roast.

      Roast too dark, roast too light, try them both then roast just right!

      Building your own table of what works for you on your equipment and your own taste is by far the best bet.

      Most of all Hot Java, enjoy the hands-on learning, take lots of notes and only change one variable at a time so that you can see what the cause/effect is. In no time at all you will be roasting exactly to suit YOU.

      (PS: great post Flynn, far better than my mini rant)


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      • #4
        Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

        Originally posted by 0728223F460 link=1269753140/2#2 date=1269774192
        Please, please... just roast.

        Roast too dark, roast too light, try them both then roast just right!


        Building your own table of what works for you on your equipment and your own taste is by far the best bet.
        I like this quote a lot Andy (I am going to use it   if thats OK)

        Ones tongue & taste-buds are the best judge

        KK

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        • #5
          Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

          Originally posted by 143B312C550 link=1269753140/2#2 date=1269774192
          Roast too dark, roast too light, try them both then roast just right!
          Roast too dark, roast too light, chew them green then roast just right!

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          • #6
            Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

            Hi guys, yes I do agree with you all - and that is what Ive been doing.

            I AM enjoying the experience and appreciating the nuances and complexities involved. Dont get me wrong - Im not putting together paint-by-number rules of roasting but merely indicators to help guide me on the journey. Maybe its my science background but I find some comfort for example in looking at those numbers on the DMM and having SOME idea where in the process I am. There is no substitute of course for ones taste and experience - which unfortunately is precisely what is lacking when starting out. The sensory aspects of the process however is probably one the most enjoyable parts.

            Back to my log book and popper to learn some more

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            • #7
              Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

              After manually writing up my roast logs in a notebook for a bit - which was very tedious - I now use this roast worksheet.

              I hope others also find it useful.



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              • #8
                Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

                I use Andys Roast monitor software and probe and keep the paper for origami 8-)

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                • #9
                  Re: Roast Temp - Level - Character guide

                  Hi HJ,

                  As another newbie and also a slow learner, while I agree with the need to roast/cup/reflect as emphasized by the various respondents, I find your original table post useful as a birds-eye view of a street level experience, though not a substitute (in the spirit that you put it forward I think).
                  Just what temp we are measuring with our TC probes is variable but for a particular roaster and TC etc. combo, I would think useful for the purposes of contemplation and understanding.
                  I roast once a week/fortnight and need training once a week/fortnight, it keeps things tidy. Tables help me visualise the complex realities (IYKWIM).

                  Thanks Lindsay

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