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  • Coretto cover project

    About to embark on my next pet project for the betterment of roast quality.
    As far as i know, Greenman and Mal has their version of a customized cover for the coretto, and they are most welcome to enlighten me on tips on how to construct a suitable lid.

    From what i can gather, a lid holds the heat in. Heat from a heatgun goes through an opening from one end, gets transmitted through the beans and then gets pushed out through another opening via another hole with the chaff.
    This way of roasting results in a sweeter tasting bean compared to those roasted without a lid, if done the right way according to others.

    I would like to know is: What material is best for this device?
    How to attach a handle to the cover for easy removal?
    Is there a way to mount the heatgun directly on the cover without melting itself?

    With this sort of set-up i will be using the DMM logger and PC to monitor the roast.

    An idea i have is to construct some form of chimney for the outlet, making it point away so that heat and chaff dont affect the heatguns performance.
    The hole for the chimney would obviously be wide enough for a trier to go in and extract a few beans for vision monitoring.

    My thinking is the cover would have to fit nicely on the top of the rim of the bread pan so that heat and chaff do not collect around the bottom of the breadmaker and possibly overheating things and chaff making a mess.

    The upside to using a cover is i guess, the lower heat output of the heatgun, and the better quality of the roast.

    Would discussions about heat and air input during stages of roasting be more appropriate in the roasting tips and tricks section?

    I appreciate any tips and advice from all. In return i hope to help others who wish to undertake a similar project.

    Gary at G

  • #2
    Re: Coretto cover project

    I use a floor tile, and slide it on/off during roast. chaff is still a problem, but... it works

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Coretto cover project

      Thanks James.
      How did you find the cup quality with and without the tile?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Coretto cover project

        Hi Gary at G,

        I have been a covered Corretto user for some time and have but would not make any particular claims other than it suits my needs for coffee roasting and construction.
        I selected aluminium sheet for the construction of the lid for the Corretto, largely because I thought it would be easy to work and in spite of its high heat transmitting properties.
        I use springs in the lids 4 corners to hold it firmly to the bread makers body and have cut a hole in the lid and fixed a piece of steel tube through the lid so that I can just plug the heat gun into it maintaining the same position for all roasts.
        In addition I have mounted a half cover on the bread/bean bowl.
        I have fitted a toughened glass sliding door for loading and unloading and some bakelite saucepan lid handles for moving the lid when hot.
        I would suggest that you cut a hole in the floor of the bread makers oven chamber for chaff dissipation rather than the lid, as air flow and gravity working together are likely to be more effective than either alone. I also use the BMs heating element during roasts which has obstructed chaff dissipation.
        After finishing construction of my new Corretto No.1 Mk3 I posted:
        http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1276428859
        Not much has changed since and would largely follow the same format in future for Mk4. I have settled on 1000g of green per roast as the bread/bean bowl will not hold anymore.

        Lindsay

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Coretto cover project

          Thanks for your input Knowledgethirst.
          Thats one way of doing it that has given great results for you.
          Im the kind of person who prefers simplicity.
          At the moment i have the idea of having a aluminium flat cover that sits on top of the breadpan. The length and width of cover to meet the walls of breadmaker for security. Also this would keep heat away from the thermoprobe.
          A wooden stick cut from a mop handle, affixed to a screw from the bottom of cover, in the middle.
          Perhaps a wood handle may be suitable since it transfers less heat than metal.

          The heatgun would then be held vertically at the nozzle by an attachment where the hole is so that a stand is not required.

          As per my original post, a short chimney, can either circle, square or rectangle at the other end of cover.
          If its all too hard, perhaps i should just cut a hole big enough for a trier as well as allowing enough velocity for heat and chaff to escape, then run a fan to blow at the coretto, keeping heatgun cool and chaff free as well as keeping chaff away from the unit.

          What do you guys think?
          Would that be a effective and simple solution?

          Gary at G

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Coretto cover project

            Originally posted by 120805041600181212610 link=1305995385/4#4 date=1306056639
            The heatgun would then be held vertically at the nozzle by an attachment where the hole is so that a stand is not required.
            im assuming you would then adjust the heat at 2nd crack using the HG controls based on your thermoprobe?

            Im trying to put something similar together too, but as i still use my BM for actual bread (kneading it anyways) i cant cut a hole in for a thermo. So i need to be able to raise and lower HG height to manage heat.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Coretto cover project

              I know what I would do if I had access to a decent workshop with appropriate tools available....

              Rather than opt for the Heatgun through the top like most of us have employed one way or another, I would break through the side of the BM and Bread-pan, and run the heatgun nozzle directly through this entry such that the bottom of the heatgun nozzle just rested on the (internal) floor of the bread-pan.

              In other words, I would get the heat directly into the bean mass. Some small gauge wire-screen over the hole in the bread-pan would prevent an occasional errant bean or three from trying to make their way into the nozzle when the heatgun is turned off, or before it is first turned on.

              The cover Ive made for my BM bread-pan currently, just slides on and off and is made from 8mm fibre-board; similar to the stuff that lines wood-heater fireboxes. Very little heat is lost through that. One end has a hole where the heatgun nozzle pokes through as a neat fit and opposite that, an identical hole to exhaust the air and chaff. This system works pretty well and is easy to manage.

              I have also tried wrapping the bread-pan in many layers of heavy woven fibreglass cloth. Coupled together with the lid, internal temperature is very easily controlled and doesnt need a super big output heatgun to roast up to 1.0Kg batches. In fact, like Lindsay, Ive managed to control batches up to 900g with a 1,600W heatgun and little trouble. Best results are achieved when using a variable output heatgun though; allows you to control the roast profile to the nth degree, if you so want.

              Might try the direct heat mod mentioned above one day. Will have to wait and see.....

              Mal.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Coretto cover project

                Originally posted by 795E405E4F442B0 link=1305995385/5#5 date=1306066175
                Originally posted by 120805041600181212610 link=1305995385/4#4 date=1306056639
                The heatgun would then be held vertically at the nozzle by an attachment where the hole is so that a stand is not required.
                im assuming you would then adjust the heat at 2nd crack using the HG controls based on your thermoprobe?

                Im trying to put something similar together too, but as i still use my BM for actual bread (kneading it anyways) i cant cut a hole in for a thermo.  So i need to be able to raise and lower HG height to manage heat.
                Hi rukudo,

                Yes. I have the Bosch 630 model which has temperature controls as well as 3 fan settings.

                I was inspired by Mals advice in another thread about having a low fan speed at start of roast til before first crack, then increasing fan speed for ramping up after.
                A similar recommendation was listed down on roasting in a roasting publication.

                The beauty i presume with a covered system is that air flow into the system, or shall we say the bean mass, comes via the heatgun without contamination from the atmosphere as per the case of an open system (without a cover).

                If you need to unfortunately use the breadmaker for making bread as well, you can still use the stainless thermoprobe affixed to metal clips on the lip of the breadpan and have it firmly on the inside of the pan, in the bean mass. When youre ready to dump the beans, you don;t have to extract the probe, just remove the pan with the probe, and then dump.
                This way you can still have the option of open or enclosed system available.... and still make bread.

                Hey Mal, if i had a workshop with the tools necessary for the job, i would not have a problem doing what you and Knowledgethirst suggested, as they give the best results.
                Alas, working in the hospitality sector.....hence the need to come to a affordable and simple solution.

                In an earlier project, i used a cake tin bought from the chinese grocer which you could bend with your own hands and it worked as treat as a pan drilled with holes for the "exhaust fan in a bucket" bean cooler.
                I thought about getting another one of those and then using simple tools, cut the bottom off to fit the inside of the breadmaker, then knocking a hole for the heatgun, and another for the exit for heat/chaff as well as wooden handle for quick removal.
                This sits on the top of the breadpan.

                I am keen on insulating the breadpan Mal, going by your fibreglass cloth experience. Is that available at any hardware store?

                The fibreboard, can they be drilled using hole saw attachments for drillguns?
                Keen to give that a try.

                If this works and it translates to a better cup, i will provide the feedback and hopefully, this simple set-up and method can be utilised by those who dont like the idea of making holes on their breadmakers nor have the workshop equipment available.

                To be continued...
                Gary at G


                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Coretto cover project

                  Lordy!  I was looking for a thread on breadmaking to complement my coffee maker, and here we seem to have a blueprint for time-machine construction!  Wow you guys really must be into your technology!

                  Im a simplecoffee and bread lover. Have a coffee maker, but only recently acquired a breadmaker: http://www.panasonic.co.uk/html/en_GB/290123/module/general/compare/productsCategory.html
                  which I got as a present.

                  Together these two things should help me sell my flat.. because everyone says that the smell of freshly baked bread and freshly brewed coffee make a place seem more homely to prospective buyers!

                  Anyway, I might have a fiddle with my breadmaker sometime.. bit doubt if i can do (or want to do!)  a conversion in the way you have!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Coretto cover project

                    Originally posted by 415B565745534B4141320 link=1305995385/7#7 date=1306174701
                    Hey Mal, if i had a workshop with the tools necessary for the job, i would not have a problem doing what you and Knowledgethirst suggested, as they give the best results.
                    Alas, working in the hospitality sector.....hence the need to come to a affordable and simple solution.
                    Im kinda in the same position at the moment so have had to jury-rig work benches, vices and what have you just so that I can achieve simple outcomes. The plan is to set up a genuine workshop in the not too distant future (months not years I hope) so it might even become reality with the other mod I mentioned, re: the direct heat application into the bean mass.

                    Originally posted by 415B565745534B4141320 link=1305995385/7#7 date=1306174701
                    I am keen on insulating the breadpan Mal, going by your fibreglass cloth experience. Is that available at any hardware store?
                    Yes mate. Just ask for a Fibreglass Fire Blanket and that will do the job.

                    Originally posted by 415B565745534B4141320 link=1305995385/7#7 date=1306174701
                    The fibreboard, can they be drilled using hole saw attachments for drillguns?
                    Keen to give that a try.
                    Yes mate, they can. Thats all I used, with the drill set on the hammer action and at a slow chuck speed. Cuts through like a hot knife through butter.

                    Originally posted by 415B565745534B4141320 link=1305995385/7#7 date=1306174701
                    If this works and it translates to a better cup, i will provide the feedback and hopefully, this simple set-up and method can be utilised by those who dont like the idea of making holes on their breadmakers nor have the workshop equipment available.

                    To be continued...
                    Gary at G
                    Look forward to the outcomes Gary. A nice project..... 8-)

                    Mal.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Coretto cover project

                      Thanks for your help Mal, and all you guys out there.
                      Looking forward to it.

                      Will put up some pics too.

                      Welcome to Coffeesnobs Colin.
                      I can certainly recommend the homely smells of freshly made bread or coffee to help you along with the sale.
                      Good luck.
                      Have a good read in this website on suitable roasting methods and equipment.
                      You might want to try a popcorn maker first. Its the weapon of choice for those wanting to test the waters of coffee roasting.
                      Dont get too carried away with the breadmaker just yet. 

                      Gary at G

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Coretto cover project

                        Up to date, im having a number of setbacks due to my lack of appropriate tools.

                        Over the weekend i tried shaping a biscuit tin ( the danish cookie kind) to fit the top of breadpan but i cut myself a couple of times due to the sharp metal bits sticking out, and also it was too flimsy for the heatgun to sit on top. So that mini project scrapped.

                        Next i tried the tile trick as James suggested.
                        Bought a tile from Bunnings, a set of holesaw bits, got back and realised the bit doesnt fit the drill that i have.
                        To make things worse, i marked the tile with the stanley knife and attempted to separate but the whole tile shattered to pieces. So i thought to myself "bugger that" and cleaned the mess up.
                        I didnt buy the fibro board that Mal suggested because id have to buy the whole item which is quite big, and i didnt want to do that...
                        Perhaps i misunderstood and should have looked for Fibreboard, not fibro board.
                        Wheres the best place for that one Mal?

                        My last resort is the cake tin trick.
                        My question is, whats the best cutting tool for the job that does not require power?

                        Boy will i be glad i can pull this project off without losing more hairs. ;D

                        Gary at G

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Coretto cover project

                          Gary
                          If you have no tools I may have an easy suggestion

                          This suggestion will take you back to kindergarten

                          Go to a  craft shop and get some clay

                          Fashion it to the shape and size of your BM opening
                          Also using a can to cut out the heat gun access

                          **Tip add a little handle to the design (just like a ping pong paddle) so its easy to lift on/off

                          If you feel it needs strength you can sandwich some wire in between 

                          Bake it in the oven to harden it

                          All you need is your 2 hands to make it
                          Hope that helps you on your quest & roasting journey

                          Regards
                          KK

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Coretto cover project

                            Originally posted by 4F5558594B5D454F4F3C0 link=1305995385/11#11 date=1306726587
                            I didnt buy the fibro board that Mal suggested because id have to buy the whole item which is quite big, and i didnt want to do that...
                            Perhaps i misunderstood and should have looked for Fibreboard, not fibro board.
                            Wheres the best place for that one Mal?
                            Its just the current asbestos-free fibre-cement board that is the replacement for the old Fibro stuff. I grabbed the thicker stuff both for extra strength and better insulating properties.

                            I got mine from a local Home Hardware store from their off-cut bin. I offered to pay but they wouldnt hear of it and in the end, I persuaded them to accept a couple of bags of freshly roasted coffee from the Corretto after I had the lid sorted out. Theyre a good bunch up here, and when ever we drop in for something or other, I ask em if theyd like another bag or two. They never say no... :P ;D

                            Ill grab the lid and take a few photos for you mate. Mine is designed to slide on and off the Big Loafs bread-pan but if you cant do that on your BM, just create a lip around the perimeter of the lid so that it either sits inside or outside the bread-pan depending on whats going to work. KKs idea to fabricate a handle is a good one too and worth doing... 8-)

                            Photos coming shortly Gary....

                            Mal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Coretto cover project

                              Ill have to say right now that KKs solution sounds veery much achievable going by my lack of handyman knowhow and toolmanship.

                              I see what you mean Mal. Thanks for your response.
                              Those pics tell a thousand words. Would a hacksaw do a proper job of cutting or would i need a power tool of sorts?

                              Keen to give this a try soon.


                              I really want to try and construct all those different forms of coretto covers given the right tools and knowhow, and then select which one that would be most suitable for my needs and results.

                              Oh lord :, wont you buy me...a big working shed...
                              To be continued...
                              Gary at G.

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