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Stovetop Roaster from Brazil

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  • Stovetop Roaster from Brazil

    Came across this stovetop roaster from Brazil on evil bay.

    Anyone tried one? About $80 shipped. Looks like the same material cheap woks are made of?


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    There's a video of a larger version of the same type being used by a local. Where's the temp probe?

    Coffee Roasting in Brazil - YouTube

  • #2
    Nice flick. Could be part of Nescafé's global production network

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Bernsbrew View Post
      Nice flick. Could be part of Nescafé's global production network
      I believe its Nescafe 'next generation' and the video is beta testing phase of their new hi-tech equipment.

      Currently the search is on for virgin rainforest to provide the fuel for roasting!

      Comment


      • #4
        For $80 you can have a nice coretto setup. I know which I'd prefer!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by KiteStyle3 View Post
          For $80 you can have a nice coretto setup. I know which I'd prefer!
          I'm just after a roaster that doesn't take up a lot of room and isn't fiddly to set-up like a coretto as I don't have the space to leave one permenantly set-up.

          This stove-top is along the lines of the FZRR-700 baby roaster except about a quarter the cost and personally, I'm not totally convinced re: the copper issue with the FZRR-700.

          There is also something appealing about the simplicity and 'organic' nature of the stovetop. A real 'hands-on' deal. Shame shipping is so expensive.
          Most of the same benefits of the baby roaster minus the copper and no teflon coating as in most bread makers.

          That being said the KK has caught my interest and I am currently looking into how to bring the cost down to a more affordable level.

          Comment


          • #6
            Copper Issue????????
            The misinformation on the internet is astounding. You can always find some sort of "research" that proves anything on the interweb.

            Before you bag the use of copper in the FZRR-700, what do you think this stovetop roaster is made from? Is the metal it is made from proven safe? If so, by who? It looks like some backyard job to me.

            The company that manufacture FZRR-700 are a well respected manufacturer supplying high quality coffee roasters all over the world. They would not use copper if it was not safe. The above does not compare in the remotest. Having performed hundreds of roasts on the FZRR-700, I would say it is extremely good value for money, very well built, and has no issues with copper.

            If you cannot afford it, that is fine, no one is forcing you to buy the unit. Please do not cast misinformed allegations about a proven unit that delivers sensational results.
            As to direct comparisons, you are sadly mistaken. The FZRR-700 is very unique and well engineered. The results in the cup are excellent. The above will not deliver the same result. Yes, it will brown beans, but so do many other devices.
            Many respected roasters will confirm that the FZRR-700 produces a truly unique result. The above is so different in design, that I cannot understand any attempt at a comparison.
            As a toy, and a start to roasting, yes it is ideal. The FZRR-700 and KKTO are in a totally different class.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by CafeLotta View Post
              I'm not totally convinced re: the copper issue
              Sounds like I need to clarify due to a bad choice of words. My point was in regard to the on-going debate re: copper use in cookware.
              There are 2 sides to the debate and lots of information. Everyone can take from it what they will. This together with the teflon discussions have been well and truly covered elsewhere. Not getting drawn back into it.

              I am not attacking the FZRR-700 or its performance. Not the intention of this thread.

              I am trying to source information from anyone who may have had hands on experience with the roaster shown at the beginning of this thread and therefore provide some accurate facts in regard to it.

              As many before me I am going through the process of selecting what suits me at this point in time.
              Value for money, performance, convenience, safety all come into play.
              Lots of variations on the theme make it an intriguing excercise. Some really functional backyard contraptions add to the mix!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CafeLotta View Post
                I'm just after a roaster that doesn't take up a lot of room and isn't fiddly to set-up like a coretto as I don't have the space to leave one permenantly set-up.
                ... A real 'hands-on' deal....
                I find the coretto very hands-on, but it's more about stirring to aid the movement (stop beans getting caught in corners), watching the beans really closely through each stage and the timing, picking out stinkers, and adjusting the temp input etc.

                I would imagine the FFZZRR and the device above would be less hands on in that way, because of the closed design - beans in, on heat, listen/time, off.
                I would personally miss having my nose in the beans.

                For the record I do a coretto roast every 2nd weekend. I don't leave the coretto set up.
                It takes me 30 mins to setup, roast, bag the beans, blow the chaff into garden, and pack away.
                Of that it's approx 3 mins setup and 3 mins pack up.
                It takes about 1.5m of shelf space in the garage - cardboard box for beans n bits (gloves wooden spoon etc), bread maker, cooler body (bucket), garden blower (motor),extension cord, heat gun on stand.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by KiteStyle3 View Post
                  I find the coretto very hands-on, but it's more about stirring to aid the movement (stop beans getting caught in corners), watching the beans really closely through each stage and the timing, picking out stinkers, and adjusting the temp input etc.

                  I would imagine the FFZZRR and the device above would be less hands on in that way, because of the closed design - beans in, on heat, listen/time, off.
                  I would personally miss having my nose in the beans.

                  For the record I do a coretto roast every 2nd weekend. I don't leave the coretto set up.
                  It takes me 30 mins to setup, roast, bag the beans, blow the chaff into garden, and pack away.
                  Of that it's approx 3 mins setup and 3 mins pack up.
                  It takes about 1.5m of shelf space in the garage - cardboard box for beans n bits (gloves wooden spoon etc), bread maker, cooler body (bucket), garden blower (motor),extension cord, heat gun on stand.
                  I can see your point re: coretto especially the visual aspect of roasting. My thoughts re: hands-on with both the manual FZRR and the Brazil stovetop was the hands-on rotation.

                  As it turns out, I just bought a used breadmaker at a very good price (under $20) - too good to pass up! Being a Panasonic I'm hoping any non-stick is high quality & intact otherwise I'll need to strip it. I already had an adjustable heat gun so in the short term I thought I'd give the corretto a burl while deciding on a long term solution.

                  I'm kicking myself now for putting the old pedestal fan out for hard rubbish collection last time due to the need to declutter. Still need to declutter more which is why the corretto wasn't on the radar initially. Oh well.

                  In the longer term the KKTO seems to be the way I'll go but we'll see. Already have the required 24cm multi-pot in the cupboard but need to work out a way to explain a sudden disappearance in the future.

                  If I can streamline the corretto operation if may forfill our needs. Can't argue with the value for money aspect!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Always the way, don't use something for years, throw it out, then you need it a week later!

                    I started without any real cooler (ie the wave it round in a colander method) and it's fine as long as you pull your roast a bit earlier so it has time to cool slowly without going too far.

                    After a while I invested $15 in a leaf blower and $8 in a bucket, and some metal fly screen and screws. Made the cooler you see below.

                    Photo Album - Imgur

                    I had the yellow stand doing nothing, came with some floodlights which I've mounted above my work bench.

                    You might need to set up outdoors because of the chaff, you can see some in the pics but there's a lot more than that in the air.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KiteStyle3 View Post
                      I had the yellow stand doing nothing, came with some floodlights which I've mounted above my work bench.
                      Always good to have something on hand that will do the job.

                      Had a good indoor light stand a while ago that would have worked but that too went out in the hard rubbish collection!

                      Was doing a search last night for some sort of stand and came across the ones shown below. They're available in the US for around $12-$20 but weighing about 6 pounds the $45 shipping kills the price again.

                      The only one I found for sale over here was as a disability aid at the rip-off price of $140!

                      Have to keep looking but the design concept with these is good. I especially like the last one with the clamp.


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                      • #12
                        Well if you need some floodlights- $30 at bunnings gets you a stand and some bonus lights.
                        500W Twin Halogen Tripod Work Light - Bunnings Warehouse

                        That stand is too tall for use all on the same level - you need to have it at a lower level to the bread maker. (see my pics) However you could set it up on the floor beside the table/bench/etc.

                        It is good because it's height adjustable, so after first crack I wind the ring to loosen, slip the heat gun up an inch, and wind the ring back tight.

                        Otherwise if you search on coretto here, you'll find all sorts of setups. People have used drill presses, bottle cappers, lamp arms, or just screwed some wood together.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by KiteStyle3 View Post
                          Well if you need some floodlights- $30 at bunnings gets you a stand and some bonus lights.
                          500W Twin Halogen Tripod Work Light - Bunnings Warehouse

                          That stand is too tall for use all on the same level - you need to have it at a lower level to the bread maker. (see my pics) However you could set it up on the floor beside the table/bench/etc.

                          It is good because it's height adjustable, so after first crack I wind the ring to loosen, slip the heat gun up an inch, and wind the ring back tight.

                          Otherwise if you search on coretto here, you'll find all sorts of setups. People have used drill presses, bottle cappers, lamp arms, or just screwed some wood together.
                          Thanks for the tip on the stand. Unfortunately the Panasonic SD-206 breadmaker I bought for $15 doesn't have a long enough kneading cycle. The manual shows various options but having tested and timed the most likely ones, they won't be long enough. Can't piggy back the options as there is a 10 minute lock out before you can repeat.

                          Decided not to try rewiring as playing around with 240V doesn't leave any room for error. I couldn't find a thread that made it easy to find which breadmakers have a long enough knead cycle out of the box but will keep looking.

                          What is the optimum length of time for corretto roasting?

                          Oh well, $15 isn't much and we're now trying it as a breadmaker just for the hell of it. It rates really well for its intended purpose!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CafeLotta View Post
                            Thanks for the tip on the stand. Unfortunately the Panasonic SD-206 breadmaker I bought for $15 doesn't have a long enough kneading cycle. The manual shows various options but having tested and timed the most likely ones, they won't be long enough. Can't piggy back the options as there is a 10 minute lock out before you can repeat.

                            Decided not to try rewiring as playing around with 240V doesn't leave any room for error. I couldn't find a thread that made it easy to find which breadmakers have a long enough knead cycle out of the box but will keep looking.

                            What is the optimum length of time for corretto roasting?

                            Oh well, $15 isn't much and we're now trying it as a breadmaker just for the hell of it. It rates really well for its intended purpose!
                            Hi Cafelotta

                            At the top of the Roasters home page there is a section : Information/reviews of breadmakers

                            There you can see a number of breadmakers that have a knead cycle of 20min or more

                            Hope that helps.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Cadan View Post
                              Hi Cafelotta

                              At the top of the Roasters home page there is a section : Information/reviews of breadmakers

                              There you can see a number of breadmakers that have a knead cycle of 20min or more

                              Hope that helps.
                              Thanks for that. I have already sourced a Breville dual paddle which has a long enough knead cycle. Problem is we've been getting a little carried away with bread baking!

                              Found a really good date/fruit loaf recipe so have to wait until the novelty wears off as it has become very popular in the household.

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