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Kaffelogic Nano 7 fluidised air bed roaster

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  • #31
    I would really love to taste some behmor roasts of the same thing up against some kaffelogic roasts; the two look like they roast so radically differently that I reckon it would be fascinating. I got some great results from the kaffelogic that I was borrowing, kept poor records and then failed to replicate them as I stumbled around looking for profiles before I gave it back to a friend.

    I love it how on home roasting discussions, people always talk about capacity, as though it is absolutely essential that you roast 100% of your needs for 1-2 weeks in a single batch. In terms of throughput, I found the kaffelogic quite fast per hour because it requires basically the least setup time possible. If you're the sort of person that dials in one roast and then just repeats it, it's pretty good at stopping based on time and temp. In terms of workflow, the thing to do, I found, was to weigh out all of your 100g batches in advance (I used takeaway cups, which I re-use), and then you can basically be good to go straight away. What took me a lot of time was separately bagging the batches and separately weighing them to collect all of the data, since I was experimenting with many different roast profiles. If you wanted to roast like 1/2kg of green and just drink it once you'd gotten a roast profile dialled in, I reckon you'd be able to weigh everything out, set up and get it all packed in probably under an hour. For me, most of that time would be the roaster ticking away by itself, within sight and earshot, on the balcony, with me simultaneously getting other stuff done eg. dishes, laundry, etc., so I reckon the actual active time that it would add to my day - if I used it that way - would probably be less than half an hour. I think the Ikawa is probably a little too small to be practical for most things, but the kaffelogic's size seems pretty practical. If you'd usually buy a 250g bag of roasted coffee, you'll probably do 3 roasts. If you're roasting a blend, I would have thought that would be just about perfect to roast a few different things separately.
    Last edited by luca; 8 June 2020, 02:23 PM. Reason: Added last para

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    • #32
      Originally posted by c0alJK View Post
      How do you guys find roasting quality on a kaffelogic vs behmor? Are they similar?
      Not even close

      Originally posted by c0alJK View Post
      Would you say you prefer kaffelogic heavily over the behmor for roasting simplicity and profiling?
      For sure, simple, and far superior control = quality the Behmor simply is not capable of

      Originally posted by luca View Post
      I would really love to taste some behmor roasts of the same thing up against some kaffelogic roasts
      I have both mate, I wouldn't waste my time.

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      • #33
        What about a hottop vs kaffelogic? I think that would be a similar comparison, anyone tried both or have any opinions?

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        • #34
          Originally posted by DamianB View Post
          I have both mate, I wouldn't waste my time.
          With the behmor? That's what I thought. But it's so popular that I'm curious.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by c0alJK View Post
            What about a hottop vs kaffelogic? I think that would be a similar comparison, anyone tried both or have any opinions?
            They seem pretty different to me. The kaffelogic uses the airflow for bean agitation, so the element must heat that air, and since the airflow must be fast enough to agitate the beans, temp changes occur extremely quickly. It's a fluid bed roaster. The hottop uses the rotating drum to agitate the beans and, at least on the ones I saw ages ago, a big electric heating element that radiates the heat into the roasting chamber, so I have no idea how fast temp changes occur, but airflow in the hottop must be much lower. The hottop has a light, perforated drum, so I don't know how much conductive heat you'll really get from it, but it will probably be a lot more than you'll get from the kaffelogic. Chalk and cheese, I would have thought.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by luca View Post

              With the behmor? That's what I thought. But it's so popular that I'm curious.
              Yes.
              The Behmor will roast beans, and they can be ok, but they are never super nor as evenly roasted.
              The built-in roast modes are pretty bad, the best way to use a Behmor is to retrofit a probe and live graph so you can manually control the temperature to follow the curve.
              But you will never maximise development or eliminate stringent baked tastes. Roasting two batches exactly the same is pretty much impossible.

              With the NZ, you can pretty well press a button and walk away, it will run the profile as you intended it to. That profile can be pretty well exactly how you want the beans dried, the mallard can be tweaked for best flavour and then developed clean of defects.
              Sure, there is some learning curve, like there is with the Decent, but straight out of the box it will still roast your beans better and more consistently than a Behmor.

              I'm not bagging out Behmor, it is just they are different leagues, like comparing Robust to Geisha

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              • quester
                quester commented
                Editing a comment
                Small typo "With the NZ, you can pretty well press a button and walk away, it will run the profile as you intended it to..." ought to be "With KL"...

            • #37
              Originally posted by DamianB View Post
              The Behmor will roast beans, and they can be ok, but they are never super nor as evenly roasted.
              I think you meant to write, "I didn't get great results" which is very different to what you wrote.

              The Behmor is a popular home roaster in Australia because:
              • It does a great job
              • It's easy to use
              • Has won more home roasting competitions than any other roaster on the market
              • Costs a fraction of the price
              • Roasts bigger batch sizes
              I suspect you simply didn't get good at Behmor roasting.

              Originally posted by DamianB View Post
              I'm not bagging out Behmor, it is just they are different leagues, like comparing Robust to Geisha
              That is unfair and simply wrong and the only reason I'm replying.

              Anyway, feel free to continue to talk about the Nano in this thread and if you want to improve your Behmor roasts you'll get help in a Behmor thread.

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              • #38
                Agree with Andy...

                Never had any problems achieving great results in the cup with my Behmor, and that was with the original basic control panel not the Plus model.
                Seems that you have been looking for a roaster that does it all for you with minimal user input, and have found it with the KaffeLogic. That's great when you find equipment that suits the way you prefer to do things. For me and many, many others here though, I really enjoy the extra hands on approach that the Behmor and other more manual roasting methods involve. Allows me to tweak the profile to achieve exactly the results I'm looking for.

                Mal.

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                • #39
                  I've had my Behmor 1600+ for over 4 years and have done hundreds of roasts on it. I've installed a Heatsnob (in the standard position), done lots of experimenting and have been set up to cool my coffee externally for most of that time. I feel like I've got enough experience to speak about it honestly. My take on it is that it's a great home roaster that can do many things and will suit many people, but there's two or three things that it either can't do very well or isn't set up for. If you want a roaster that you can load up with 200-500g of green coffee and roast it to a medium to medium-dark level to use with your espresso machine then it will do that quite well. A couple of the auto profiles will work if you just want to push the button and let the machine do it's thing or you can get involved and use the manual features and even look to cool externally. The main thing it can't do is good light roasts, especially for filter brewing. It can do a reasonable job and can roast on the lighter side for a tasty espresso, but it's a bit hit and miss. The problem you've got is that if you try for a shorter roast time you often run too hot and either scorch the beans at the start or have them run away around first crack. If you go a bit more gently to avoid this then any roast over 100g will run to at least 12min and while it may not end up 'baked' in the true sense of this from a roasting point of view it's simply too long a roast time to highlight any brightness or acidity in a given coffee. So if you want to roast predominantly for manual soft brew then look elsewhere. For most other things it does a pretty good job.
                  Due to the largish capacity it can be a good roaster for people that just want to roast once every 1-2 weeks depending on their usage, and you don't need to set up to cool externally. The main pro of cooling externally is just maintaining a bit more control and ensuring that you don't 'over-roast' a batch. The main con is that you release the chaff and create a bit of mess. It's been a great roaster for me to learn more about roasting in general on over the last few years and I don't think there's anything that comes close in the same price range, but you do need to factor in all these things. Personally where I'm at right now on my coffee journey I'd buy a Kaffelogic as I want to roast for soft brew mostly at home. But at over twice the price of the Behmor I simply can't afford it.

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                  • #40
                    Among the arguments for and against the roaster, I think the most compelling reason for the Kaffelogic is lost. All the roasters mentioned above are very capable for turning green beans brown for brewing. What stands the Kaffelogic apart from the other roasters is that it is a profile-following roaster.

                    Roasting on the Kaffelogic starts with the beans and a profile. The profile acts as a program to tell the roaster what to do. You can use a profile defined by someone else or you can use a tool to construct a profile. This tool helps you define the time and temperature for each roast phase as a continuous curve. If you like a particular profile on a coffee, you can come back a week or a month later to roast the same bean with the same profile and you get the same result in the cup.

                    The ability for repeatable roast and automation is what people are willing to pay extra for.

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                    • #41
                      My take. The Behmor produced roasts for me that were a good alternative to commercial beans at a lower price. It requires you to commit to being there beside it as the roast hits first crack and beyond. There is quite a chaff mess to clean up afterward. The Kaffelogic produces roasts that are superior to any of the commercial roasts I have bought. I can make small changes to the roast development and easily perceive the changes. The origin flavours are much easier to discern. It is simple to use, I can leave it unattended, the clean up is very easy and I can run 4 roasts back to back before I need to empty the chaff collector. My Behmor is up for sale. I had a Genecafe roaster before the Behmor. A particularly chaff heavy bean gave rise to a fire in the chaff collector, which, as the Genecafe uses plenty of plastic, wrote the roaster off.

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                      • #42
                        For some reason I can't make paragraphs in my post. Or rather I write with paragraphs but when I post it all gets run together.

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                        • #43
                          Agree lc...

                          Not really comparing apples with apples in my opinion, between these two machines.
                          Probably best to start a new thread for anyone who wants to run a discussion between the pros/cons of each and leave this thread just for the KaffeLogic...

                          Mal.

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                          • #44
                            I was almost certainly decided on getting the Gene for a few weeks, but reading this thread has changed my mind. Just ordered the Kaffelogic through Ripe Coffee in Wellington, as another poster suggested previously. 950AUD including shipping!

                            Can't wait - will report back with some unboxing + roasting results.

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                            • #45
                              Originally posted by Dimal View Post
                              Agree lc... Not really comparing apples with apples in my opinion, between these two machines. Probably best to start a new thread for anyone who wants to run a discussion between the pros/cons of each and leave this thread just for the KaffeLogic... Mal.
                              On the contrary, Mal. I, and it appears others, have found this conversation quite valuable in determining what roaster is best for them.

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                              • Dimal
                                Dimal commented
                                Editing a comment
                                So, it's fine to hijack threads with a specific topic target and use for your own purposes???
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