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  • Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

    After reading about cold process coffee making I decided to give it a go a couple of weeks ago. I did this using the "soak coffee in a jug, filter through a tea towel" method.

    This method is a bit messy.

    Makes a great coffee while stopping a couple of people in the office complaining about the smell of my plunger coffee in the morning.

    I would like to make cold process on a more regular basis.

    Can some kind person let me know where I can buy a Toddy or similar CP process device in Melbourne.

    Thanks to all, Harrance.

  • #2
    Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

    Harrance,

    I bought mine on Ebay, new from the manufacturers...I cant recall how much it all was, but it was very cheap..sent from the US. Im not sure you can buy them in Melb..

    Different way to drink coffee...very smooth and full flavoured...but it will never replace espresso...Good if you have to take a thermos flask anywhere...

    Cheers,

    Chris

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    • #3
      Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

      The standard CP Toddy utilizes a reusable filter that while it keeps costs down I found to be a pain to clean and store between uses. Additionally I found that I was making up batches all too frequently due to the small yield from this unit.

      If you drink lots of coffee/CP you might want to check and see if anybody down there sells an industrial sized CP maker.

      The standard CP toddy uses a pound of coffee. I have access to an industrial sized unit that uses 5 pounds of coffee per batch and yields 2.5 gallons of concentrate.

      Virtually all of my coffee drinking friends have converted to drinking CP rather than brewed coffee and to keep them supplied I am now doing 2 industrial sized batches a week. Once you introduce your friends to the wonders of CP you may well find yourself delunged with requests for it.

      If anybody is interested and you cant find a supplier locally I would be willing to ship these units to yall.

      Due to the size and simplicity of the brewing tank I would recommend that people make their own and then just get the filter replacement set. The brewing tank is simply a 20-25l bucket with a spigot mounted in the bottom of the side. The filters are a plastic mesh bag that is put in first and a paper filter that is then put inside of that. The plastic mesh bag is reused while the paper filter is a use once and toss item. The plastic mesh bag is there as a last chance filter should the paper filter rip or tear. Ive yet to have a paper filter fail on me but Im sure eventually it *will happen.

      There is a maximum size for the bucket so that the filters fit properly, so if you want to make your own let me know and Ill get the measurements to you.

      The base system includes a covered container with spigot along with a plastic mesh filter and 25 paper filters and costs $100USD.

      The replacement filter pack includes a plastic mesh filter and 50 paper filters and costs $95USD.

      Shipping costs are not included in these prices.

      Java "Sharing the CP" phile
      Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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      • #4
        Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

        Java,

        Ive been experimenting with CP coffee over the weekend - just steeping the grounds in my french press for 12 hours. The end product was great, but I cany help wondering - you talked about a concentrate, does the bucket version allow evaporation to occur or otherwise concentrate the flavour?

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        • #5
          Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

          Originally posted by grendel link=1154219927/0#3 date=1159839445
          Java,

          Ive been experimenting with CP coffee over the weekend - just steeping the grounds in my french press for 12 hours. The end product was great, but I cany help wondering - you talked about a concentrate, does the bucket version allow evaporation to occur or otherwise concentrate the flavour?
          No, the bucket is in fact covered and prevents any evaporation from occuring.

          The end result is a concentrate due to the small amount of water that is used in proportion to the amount of coffee. Just as an espresso is a concentrate when compared to brewed coffee, such is the case with CP.

          Using standard dosing (7g/shot) and extraction numbers (25ml/shot) a kg of beans will yield 3.57L of espresso. That same kg of beans (2.27kg of beans soaked in 13.25L of water in my large brewer) will yield only 1.89L of CP. The exact yield will vary with the beans used, the degree of roast, the fineness of the grind, and the length of the soak but should end up close to this.

          As you can see from these numbers CP is an even more concentrated form of coffee than espresso. With a dramaticly reduced acidity and long term storage ability (up too 3 weeks) with no loss in flavor when properly stored.

          I know of no one who drinks the CP undiluted, myself included. The standard ratio for drinks made from CP is 1 part CP too 6 parts water or, as I prefere it, milk. Many use it as a Depth Charge by reducing the mix ratio. This is very popular among the younger drinkers where the caffeine drinks are all the rage.

          If your tastebuds enjoy it you could certainly drink it straight up like an espresso, but realize that for every single espresso sized serving drunk, youre actually drinking a double. ;D 8-)

          For those wondering what this CP is heres a few links to discussions on the topic:
          http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1140901380/0#0
          http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1141872695/5#5
          http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1136514307/11#9



          Java "Lovin his CP" phile
          Toys! I must have new toys!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

            Ya Im getting a taste for it - I use a lot more coffee to make it but it does keep really well.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

              The strength/taste of the extract changes dramatically between the 12 hour and 24 hour soaking marks. Now-a-days the only beans I soak for 12 hours are the really dark roasts. Most of my roasts soak for 18-24 hours.

              Java "Sippin his CP" phile
              Toys! I must have new toys!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

                The big thing for me Java, is the absolute smoothness of this style coffee. Even a borderline coffee tastes sweet and smooth....

                I make up a carafe with the little Toddy maker about once a week....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

                  Originally posted by stratford link=1154219927/0#7 date=1159912416
                  The big thing for me Java, is the absolute smoothness of this style coffee.

                  Yup, yup, yup!! [smiley=tekst-toppie.gif]


                  Ive been drinking this style of coffee now for well over a quarter of a century pretty much on a daily basis and have yet to grow tired or unappreciative of its wonderful qualities.

                  If I had to choose to live with only one type of of coffee for the rest of my life, this would be it. As much as I love my espresso (not to mention all the wonderful toys that go with it ;D) it would be no contest. CP would win hands down. Pairing it up with home roasting and great beans is a match made in heaven. [smiley=smiley.gif] [smiley=engel017.gif] [smiley=smiley.gif]


                  Java "Cuckoo over CP!" phile
                  Toys! I must have new toys!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Where to buy a Cold Process coffee maker.

                    Originally posted by Javaphile link=1154219927/0#6 date=1159890689
                    The strength/taste of the extract changes dramatically between the 12 hour and 24 hour soaking marks. Now-a-days the only beans I soak for 12 hours are the really dark roasts. Most of my roasts soak for 18-24 hours.

                    Java "Sippin his CP" phile

                    Thanks for that hint - Ill try a longer process time this week!

                    Comment

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