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  • BeanBay Green Bean Release April/May

    Landed, packed and available in BeanBay now:




    Aceh Danau Laut Tawar


    Aceh Danau Laut Tawar is a naturally processed and sun-dried coffee grown in the Northern highlands. Wet hulled and triple pick hand sorting make this a very pretty Indo with a deep blue green colour. Wet hulled coffees benefit from a slower ramp profile to equalise the moisture and when roasted in the darker ranges (CS9-CS10) it produces a fat bodied, cocoa and fruit-cake style coffee which is excellent as a single origin double espresso or in milk based drinks. Another stunning Indo coffee that will work as a single origin or a big fruity bodied base to your blending.


    Dominican Republic Jarabacoa Late Pick



    Dominican Republic Jarabacoa Late Pick is another stunning late pick process where the fruit was left in contact with the seed for an extended time before honey processing and then an extended fermentation. Gives this bean big port wine flavours along with a pile of tropical fruit flavours. Easy to roast but try and keep it in the lighter side of the scale and give a good rest after roasting for biggest impact.


    Kenya AA


    Kenya AA Screened to a large AA size this washed and well graded bean roasts really well. Like many Kenyan coffees it will end up darker for the same given temperature so roast by probe, not your normal colour depth. In the cup it is crisp, winey and dry finishing, just like I remember great Kenyans to be.







    ...the required fine print...
    With the exception of the more expensive 1kg lots and the bulky 2kg Monsoon coffee, all BeanBay green beans are packed in 2.5kg zippered cotton bags, perfect for storage for up to 3 years when kept in a cool, dark and dry position. We ship all paid orders out from the Snobbery and BeanBay will calculate the available shipping options and actual freight costs to your area. Larger orders are typically cheaper to freight per kilogram so we suggest ordering all your requirements at once for the cheapest per kilo postage. We also strongly recommend that you ship to an attended address (eg: work, grandma's house, the pub) to avoid delivery delays and hassle. We ship everything the same day that we have received payment. Please remember bank lag means it can a day or two for your payment to get to us even though your bank took it from you instantly.

    Osko and PayID bank payments are near instant and fee-free, PayPal payments and Credit Card via PayPal are near instant and you pay their actual fees.

    Typically, if you want it faster don't procrastinate, just order earlier for less stress and never have a reason to ask us "are we there yet?"

    Click the +SUBSCRIBE button (top right of BeanBay Banter) to get email or forum notification of new posts in this area.
    Also see: BeanBay Green Bean sales and BeanBay Freight Options It covers most of the likely questions.

    "If I can't touch it, it doesn't exist and may never exist, when it does exist it'll appear in BeanBay, if you love it, buy more as it might never appear again"


    Enjoy!

    Andy.



  • #2

    I have been internally chanting "Are we there yet Andy?" for a couple of weeks as I want to put an order in.
    I thought there were a couple of new arrivals when I checked beanbay today.

    Comment


    • Andy
      Andy commented
      Editing a comment
      ha ha ha, you would have got the "don't make by pull over" reaction too.
      Freight is a nightmare all over the planet, things are moving but way slower and way more expensive than expected and now Easter is about to get in the way and cause the next round of lag.

      As always, we keep doing what we do and asking are we there yet never makes us get there faster.

    • fatboy_1999
      fatboy_1999 commented
      Editing a comment
      I'll turn this website around if you don't quit it!

    • amberale
      amberale commented
      Editing a comment
      Andy, Tompoland keeps coming onto my side of the seat and Dimal is pulling faces at me.

  • #3
    I'm interested in the difference between late pick and honey processed.

    Do they end up having similar taste profiles albeit achieved via different processes?

    Understand that the base bean profile is different between the varieties on offer so this might be a question that can't actually be answered.

    Cheers

    Comment


    • #4
      The late pick is left on the tree longer, the honey process is fruit left in contact with the seed longer after picking.

      This is only the second late pick bean we've managed to secure as production is tiny and experimental. Both late picked beans have had more of a "fruity port or muscat" attribute compared to honey process that is fruit dominant. It's a love it or hate it trait, those that love it will rave about it, those that don't will cringe. In the lighter roasts it's huge and I would expect the Domincan bean would do as well in coffee competition as the Ardi did.

      Comment


      • #5
        Andy, I see that our favourite green bean, Ardi Late Pick, has dropped off the shopping list. I hope this won’t be permanent?

        Comment


        • chokkidog
          chokkidog commented
          Editing a comment
          I might just duck out and get some popcorn.

      • #6
        Originally posted by oztayls View Post
        Andy, I see that our favourite green bean (INSERT ANY NAME HERE) has dropped off the shopping list.
        Please see the "fine print" in the first post of this thread (and any BeanBay release thread):

        "If I can't touch it, it doesn't exist and may never exist, when it does exist it'll appear in BeanBay, if you love it, buy more as it might never appear again"

        Comment


        • fatboy_1999
          fatboy_1999 commented
          Editing a comment
          I'm starting to lose hope of seeing Mountain Mist again

      • #7
        I’m interested in other forum member reviews on the Dominican late pick, if any of you have acquired? I’m away at the moment but will be placing another order when home

        Comment


      • #8
        This may be a naive question. I’ve been reading about Kenyan beans and, in particular, SL-34 and SL-28. Are these classifications still used and/or useful? Does the new Kenya AA bean incorporate or have some connection with either of these or is it something entirely different?

        Comment


        • #9
          Originally posted by Femelle View Post
          This may be a naive question. I’ve been reading about Kenyan beans and, in particular, SL-34 and SL-28. Are these classifications still used and/or useful? Does the new Kenya AA bean incorporate or have some connection with either of these or is it something entirely different?
          It's a good question and a longish answer. In short "SL" is Scott Laboratories who 100 years ago named the varietals they found in Africa. The SL-34 and the SL-28 are often found together and the SL-34 is the more "typical" Kenyan grown in quantity by most growers. Typically only the very smallest plots separate the varietals before they go to the mill, remember for most of the world's farmers quantity picked equals dollars earnt so it's a tiny percentage of coffee that is separated into varietals which will yield a higher price for farmer, picker, mill, exporter, importer, distributor.

          Sadly it's also often misused as a marketing ploy to justify a higher price, and sometimes I've seen dodgy samples from middlemen in the supply chain that are certainly not the varietal they say it is. We've landed specific varietals before but generally the price doubles so we are hesitant to land much volume for fear of having to drink it all myself.

          100 years is also long enough that much of the SL varietal has probably morphed into hybrids of the original identified plants and bred to produce more beans, less infection and better drought tolerance just by farmers removing low yield plants and replacing them with higher yielding ones.

          Comment


          • #10
            That makes sense to me. Thanks Andy. I think I’m going to have to try these beans.

            Comment

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