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Camera advise for latte art shots

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  • Camera advise for latte art shots

    Hey Members

    I was just looking at some amazing shots and was wondering what camera that could take such pictures? Is it because it is a very good camera with high mega pix or is it just the setting?

    I have attached a picture, so you can se the picture I am fascinated by

    // Hendrup


  • #2
    Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

    Originally posted by 062B202A3C3B3E4E0 link=1326837897/0#0 date=1326837897
    Is it because it is a very good camera with high mega pix or is it just the setting?
    I would think that the key to this picture would have been good lighting, and great timing.

    Probably the most annoying thing about digital cameras is the relatively long lagtime between pressing the button and taking the photo. This is much less of an issue on newer or high end cameras.

    There is always the just press the button heaps and hope for a good one method...

    Most moderately priced digital cameras (even many on phones) now have more than enough mega pixels (depending on your intended purpose).

    Also keep in mind that common screen resolution is much lower than print quality...

    Sooo, no not necessarily many mega pixels, but a good shot of a great shot!

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

      You want a relatively fast shutter speed and good light. Any modern camera will have more than enough pixels. In fact mega pixels really mean nothing towards the quality of a photo. Its more about the quality of the sensor and the sharpness of whatever lens the camera is using. You can pick up pretty cheap second hand dslrs these days for around the $400 mark that will easily shoot photos of that quality.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

        Thanks guys!

        Then I will try getting my own pictures with my present camera, instead of buying a new one

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

          Also try leaning your arm or body against something to steady yourself if you can.

          Take a deep breath, fire the shutter and exhale. This sometimes helps you minimise camera shake

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

            Originally posted by 406D666C7A7D78080 link=1326837897/3#3 date=1326874953
            Then I will try getting my own pictures with my present camera, instead of buying a new one Smiley
            Good plan!

            Originally posted by 6B7A4D45697C696464616B69080 link=1326837897/4#4 date=1326882346
            Also try leaning your arm or body against something to steady yourself if you can.

            Take a deep breath, fire the shutter and exhale. This sometimes helps you minimise camera shake Smiley
            Good advice!

            Also - use bag of rice as a tripod, and set the timer to 2 secs.

            crEMetallica, our local garage band have started playing Metallica covers... badly. And actually they play in a car port, which is why I can hear them. For Whom the Bell Tolls and something else. At least theyre giving it a go!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

              Hey there,
              This is my first post but see I can contribute there anyway.

              MOst cameras, even cheapy point and shoots have a "few" manual settings. If yours has Aperture Priority sometimes called AP or AV use that. Set the iso to a fairly high setting say 400 or above, then set the aperture to around F4. These settings will give you a fairly high shutter speed and enough depth of field to get the drip nicely sharp and blur the background a little. Pop up the flash and the camera will do the rest of the work.

              Youll notice in the pic you posted the foreground is nice and sharp but the background, the machine itself is a little soft.
              HTH.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                Originally posted by 3C2B3331580 link=1326837897/5#5 date=1326882893
                Originally posted by 406D666C7A7D78080 link=1326837897/3#3 date=1326874953
                Then I will try getting my own pictures with my present camera, instead of buying a new one Smiley
                Good plan!

                Originally posted by 6B7A4D45697C696464616B69080 link=1326837897/4#4 date=1326882346
                Also try leaning your arm or body against something to steady yourself if you can.

                Take a deep breath, fire the shutter and exhale. This sometimes helps you minimise camera shake Smiley
                Good advice!

                Also - use  bag of rice as a tripod, and set the timer to 2 secs.

                crEMatallica, our local garage band have started playing Metallica covers... badly. And actually they play in a car port, which is why I can hear them. For Whom the Bell Tolls and something else. At least theyre giving it a go! 
                Haha! Good to hear! Good on them Metallica once played Motorhead and Black Sabbath covers...badly in their garages too! ;D

                OP, you can also pick up a small flexible tripod from a camera shop too. Theyre great little things especially for travel! You can bend the legs around a tree. post, fence anything really.

                All youd have to do is set it up on your bench and off you go!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                  As others have said, any even semi-recent digital camera will give fine results, the key to getting great shots of shots is lighting.

                  You need enough light, either ambient light in the room or light from the cameras flash, to effectively stop the downward motion of liquid. Think of it in terms of how far the liquid is going to move in the amount of time the camera requires to make an exposure: In low light, the camera needs to open the shutter for a longer amount of time to get an image. While the shutter is open, the liquid continues to move downwards, and at a certain point this movement will become visible in the image as motion blur.

                  Another way to increase the shutter speed is by setting a higher sensitivity to light or ISO setting on the camera, but with compact cameras this will almost certainly result in noisy/grainy images.


                  Using the cameras built-in flash is therefore a good idea, as the time duration of the flash light output is extremely short (even relative to the cameras shutter speed setting), and it will effectively freeze the liquid in motion as the shot above shows. One of the problems with built-in flashes though, particularly for this sort of work, is that they are lighting the subject from the same angle as the picture is being taken which causes harsh reflections in metallic surfaces, and also built-in flashes often get very confused when they are doing close-up work and pointing at reflective stainless steel - you can end up with some very wonky exposures.

                  My advice would be to invest in even a cheap tripod, and learn to use both the manual exposure and manual focus modes of your camera. I say manual focus, because with auto focus when the camera is trying to latch onto the subject, it will not shoot until it achieves a lock which can be almost impossible when you are quite close to what is essentially a moving subject. Try and pre-focus the camera on a trial pour (or just focus on the centre of the basket) and leave it in manual mode - this will also vastly reduce the lag between you pressing the button and the camera actually making an exposure.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                    With a SLR, using the camera flash typically limits your control. It pretty much locks in shutter speed and you need to play with other settings too.  Ive never really played with compact point and shoot but I imagine they are the same. It certainly was in film cameras. While you can get an acceptable image with a flash, chances are you wont.

                    Youre better off trying to use one or more other white light sources - fluoro or led - and indirectly illuminate your subject to reduce glare and give an even light. Try using white cardboard or printer paper to reflect light in several directions. If youre careful you can eliminate shadows too.

                    Some people use optical zoom from a larger distance and digitally crop to suit. Small flexble tripods are cool but if you look around you can often pick up cheap full size tripods at lower prices and they are more flexible for varying distances. You dont need to be close to get a close-up or macro esp. if you dont own a camera with a lot of built-in functionality.

                    As with everything, start with automatic/default, check the result and then vary *one* thing at a time.
                    Start with an image without pulling a shot too. It helps with the basic photo setup.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                      Ill bet good money that the OPs reference image was taken with on-camera flash.

                      Yes it does pretty much lock in shutter speed (well not actually shutter speed, but flash duration which becomes the effective shutter speed) but locks it in to one that will arrest the motion of the liquid.

                      The duration of light output with small flash units such as built into compact cameras is something in the order of 1/10000th of a second - perfectly suited to the task of freezing liquids in motion. If you do want to freeze motion, use flash or any other light source that will allow you to set a shutter speed above say 1/250th of a second - with flash you will definitely avoid motion blur from the actual movement of liquid during the exposure, but large amounts of ambient sunlight, or fluoro or LED or any other light source will do just fine as well

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                        I agree Rick, the reference image is almost certainly taken with a built-in flash. You can see the pour is illuminated from the left from its shadow and the reflection of what looks like a flash lower right. But I dont think the OP produced the image and thats why I suggested startng with auto and going from there. It is useful to know what simple changes will do to an image. In another thread (CoffeeSnobs with cameras I think) someone else reminded us that early photographers produced excellent work from basic equipment. In part they knew their kit and they understood the relationship between light, aperture and speed.
                        [edit]heres the thread http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1249384716/#230[/edit]


                        I didnt realise cheaper compacts were capable of such fast speeds. Impressive really. I know my households various P&S compacts offer limited control/flexibility and I guess thats why I shun them in favour of my SLRs.

                        Hendrup - you should just go for and see what results you get. If you do use a flash, consider turning Red-Eye OFF first. If theres enough ambient light to focus, it will remove the lag mentioned in an earlier post. (Assuming your camera offers auo-focus.)



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                          I took this one with the built in flash on my canon 60D. Its got a cheap 50mm portrait lens on it which will open up to f1.8 (thats the aperture). This was on full manual. Shame about the cup position!

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                          • #14
                            Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                            Got to watch the depth of field. That is the range of distance that is in focus.

                            Barry

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                            • #15
                              Re: Camera advise for latte art shots

                              @ Dabbler, Im not saying compact cameras are fast - as you say, generally they are far from fast. But, rather the flash units that are built into them (and many SLRs and on-camera flash units) have one common characteristic that is very useful in this application - the very short duration of the flash light output, which becomes the effective shutter speed.

                              For instance I know my little Sunpak ring flash at a reduced 1/8 power setting has a duration of 1/22,000th of a second - which is alot faster than my cameras shutter can open and close, and this is why we can capture things like hummingbirds wings frozen in flight - its not the cameras shutter that is freezing the motion, rather the duration of the flash light output.

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