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  • historical blends...

    historically reputed as the being the first recorded coffee blends, mocha java is what ive been playing with. below is my attempt at recreating it...

    30% yemen (about a CS 9-10)
    30% ethiopian harrar (about a CS 8-9)
    30% sumatra mandheling (about a CS 8-9)
    10% indian monsooned peaberry (about a CS 8-9)

    with my interpretation of it, i was aiming for a fruity, chocolaty and full bodied and earthy coffee. the sumatra really gives the earth and buttery body as dids the monsooned peaberry with an added caramel finish. the yemen roasted darker gave the cocoa notes and the harrar the fruity acidity.

    the only downside was that i had to rest it a good 10 days to brew as an espresso. yum

  • #2
    Re: historical blends...

    Sounds like it would be good....looks like a mix of good beans too.

    Andrew

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    • #3
      Re: historical blends...

      I have gone a similar blend but without the Yemen.

      60% Ethiopian Harar (Earthy Chocolate)
      30% Sumatra Manheling (Fruit & Acidity)
      10% Indian Tiger Moutain (A bit of Crema)

      Roasted all together in the same batch until 20-25 seconds into Rolling SC. CS Scale rating of about 9-10

      Does this sound about right to you guys. I know everyones tastes are different and It is better to probably roast them seperately but I was running out of coffee and time limited so did the batch together for this one.

      Only roasted today so will not cup for 3 or 4 days. But if I run out I will be cupping soon.

      Smells great now, Usually it takes a few days to develop but the aroma is awsome now.

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      • #4
        Re: historical blends...


        Sounds good Goodies.

        Youll have to let us know how it goes. The proof is in the cup.

        I did a Mocha Kenya the other day.

        i.e 50% of 3 different Ethiopians roasted together and blended with 50% Kenya AA roasted separately to about CS 9/10 both 30 seconds into SC. Its at 4 days now and starting to come together quite well with chocolatey notes and a full body.

        Belinda

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        • #5
          Re: historical blends...

          what is the definition of a "mocha" as in "mocha java" and "mocha kenya"?

          is it the roast profile?  :-/

          L

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          • #6
            Re: historical blends...

            The original use of the term Mocha refers not to a flavor but to a location. Mocha is a port city in Yemen and beans from the area were called Yemen Mocha. It was from these beans that the term Mocha entered the English language as referring to a chocolate flavor as these beans have a very chocolaty flavor.

            The term has since been bastardized to Mocha Java and come to mean a coffee with chocolate added to it.


            Java "Hhhmmm....Yemen Mocha = Yummy!" phile
            Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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            • #7
              Re: historical blends...

              I think Mocha can also mean a Blend of Yemen or Ethiopian sometimes (As they share similar characteristics of chocolate) and Indonesian beans (Java being in indonesia).

              Well if its not right, its sounds good.

              SG

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              • #8
                Re: historical blends...

                Very interesting.
                As far as the "Java" part of the name goes, Ive often wondered about that because...
                Indonesia is made up of hundreds of islands,...
                with the two biggest ones being Sumatra (where I thought we get Sumatran Mandheling from),
                and Java where we get what? from? Does Mandheling also come from Java?

                Other well known islands Sulawesi (Toraja) and Bali (Gunung Batur) of course.

                Can someone clarify the "Java" bean type please?

                Regards
                Bullitt

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                • #9
                  Re: historical blends...

                  The island of Java was a major coffee production area for the Dutch back in the 17th Century and as such its name became closely associated with coffee.

                  I cant speak for the rest of the world but today in the US the term java is a very common slang term for coffee in general.


                  Java "Java what?!" phile
                  Toys! I must have new toys!!!

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                  • #10
                    Re: historical blends...

                    Who was Joe then?

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                    • #11
                      Re: historical blends...

                      cryptic question or creation of querulous quandry, TG?

                      L

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                      • #12
                        Re: historical blends...

                        The yanks call coffee a cup of Joe.
                        I even saw a mug the other day in Campos that said Joe on it.

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                        • #13
                          Re: historical blends...

                          ahhhh...
                          in Dutch slang: "bakkie troost"..
                          bakkie = cup,
                          troost = "comfort".. as in help for sadness, a "lift"...
                          ergo: cup of coffee!


                          L

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                          • #14
                            Re: historical blends...

                            I found this explanation of the term "joe" on a website for a Southern Highlands coffee shop:

                            "Two new names for coffee are "joe" and "HOJO." These are not names for ports or for places. One theory of where the name HOJO originates dates back to when the U.S. Navy used to allow alcoholic beverages on U.S. Navy ships. Grog, Ale, and Beer were supplied as a beverage in the general mess.

                            When Admiral Josephus "Joe" Daniels became Chief of Naval Operations, he outlawed alcohol on board ships. He ordered coffee become the beverage of service on the ships, hence the term "Cup of Joe." Because sailors are generally cold, they wanted their coffee hot. The term hot cup of joe was used, then it was shorten to hot joe, then HOJO."

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