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  • Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    I wanted to make a good Greek/Turkish Coffee Blends and have been investigating what regions are most commonly used. I have found that Brazillian and columbian beans are fairly common but what else is usually used for such a blend?

  • #2
    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    That would be it... I did a Mixed blend of African, Sumatran and Brazil for a friend and they thought it was too strong (I suspect the acidity from the Africans was what they didnt like... Upon questioning further, it was evident that a Brazil, Central blend is the way for these types if drinks. Low Acid beans....

    I have since played around with a Brazil only in Stovetop and it really cames good - The full bodied mid flavour really works in the Stovetop (provided you dont burn it).

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    • #3
      Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

      I did some research on this some time ago, as I wanted to roast some coffee for a Greek work colleague. From what Id been able to find out on the internet, "traditionally" they seem to have been made from Yemen or Ethiopian coffees, however most that are made commercially these days are usually made from a very low grade Brazil. I did read though that the "better" ones apparently still use a small amount of Ethiopian with the Brazil.

      What level of roast are you going for? I got a reply on HB, from someone that lives in Turkey, and he said that:

      Theres not a specific roast level for Turkish coffee and I believe there shouldnt be. But here in Turkiye roasters generally prefer 2 types of roast.

      a) as soon as first crack starts you stop roasting (and most people claim thats genuine Turkish Coffee)
      b) you keep roasting even after second crack ends which is dark french roast (and they call it double roasted)

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      • #4
        Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

        Ive made Turkish with Kimel roasted to 30 seconds into SC.
        Tasted OK to me, and Ive drunk a lot of Turkisk coffee in my time.

        Admittedly I was really trying out the grinder but if the coffee wasnt in the ballpark Id have noticed.

        It could also be that Im used to drinking Turkish made from Bushells out of a jar.
        My fresh Kimel couldnt taste bad compared to that.
        Maybe the preparation technique is a factor in losing any differences youd expect to notice.

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        • #5
          Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

          Originally posted by Thundergod link=1210739645/0#3 date=1210767843
          Ive made Turkish with Kimel roasted to 30 seconds into SC....[snip]...Admittedly I was really trying out the grinder but if the coffee wasnt in the ballpark Id have noticed.

          It could also be that Im used to drinking Turkish made from Bushells out of a jar.
          So, what youre really saying, TG, is that your Kimel tasted like Bushells out of a jar...? : Otherwise, you would have noticed...? :-[

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          • #6
            Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

            Not quite.
            Turkish coffee is an acquired taste or should I say it takes some getting used to.

            Its strong because you boil the heck out of it and concentrate the coffee flavour.
            The grind is very fine and you always end up with sediment in the bottom of your cup.

            I think what Im trying to say is that it doesnt matter too much what coffee you use.
            If you grind it fine enough and boil it to death it all tastes the same.

            When I tried it with the freshly roasted beans I was hoping to tastet how it would have originally (i.e. not out of a jar).
            It didnt taste "better", or really much different.

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            • #7
              Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

              Actually, despite my ribbing, Im a big fan of Turkish coffee. However, what Im used to is probably Lebanese rather than Turkish. This is made from pretty dark, probably Brasilian, coffee. However, I have had it made with good quality Yemen, and it really is very good.

              It shouldnt be, given that many people boil it several times. I now follow the practice of not actually boiling, but letting it swell three times, and then stirring it down. A good couple of taps settles most of the grinds at the bottom of the ibrik. It is surprisingly sweet. I am told that you should add sugar for some types of coffee, not sure which ones, but that otherwise its a matter of taste.

              It tastes noticeably better than Bushells when fresh but, being pulverised, doesnt stay that way for long. Absolutely terrific with a pastry or some halva... Yum! Must try the Kimel, if I can get it ground. Do you do this yourself TG?

              matt

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              • #8
                Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                TG, I think drinking coffee is an acquired taste regardless of the style. This is really the first time Ive heard of "boiling the heck out of it." The grounds would be ashen in colour. Are you sure youre not thinking of how Nescafe is made?

                Matt, your method is how I was taught, and agree, makes a great cuppa!

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                • #9
                  Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                  Dennis - As Dolcimelo said "many people boil it several times".
                  Thats where my "boiling the heck out of it" came from.

                  I dont make it that way myself.

                  I bring it to the boil only once, then remove it from the heat.


                  Dolcimelo - Yes I ground it myself with the Macap.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                    Originally posted by Thundergod link=1210739645/0#8 date=1210816798
                    Dennis - As Dolcimelo said "many people boil it several times".
                    Thats where my "boiling the heck out of it" came from.

                    I dont make it that way myself.
                    Ah ok, now I understand - would have been very surprised if you did it that way!

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                    • #11
                      Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                      Most Turkish coffees Ive consumed have been made for me by one aunt or another.

                      My wife makes it very well but we rarely make it at home.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                        Originally posted by Dolcimelo link=1210739645/0#6 date=1210773699
                        Actually, despite my ribbing, Im a big fan of Turkish coffee. However, what Im used to is probably Lebanese rather than Turkish. This is made from pretty dark, probably Brasilian, coffee. However, I have had it made with good quality Yemen, and it really is very good.

                        It shouldnt be, given that many people boil it several times. I now follow the practice of not actually boiling, but letting it swell three times, and then stirring it down. A good couple of taps settles most of the grinds at the bottom of the ibrik. It is surprisingly sweet. I am told that you should add sugar for some types of coffee, not sure which ones, but that otherwise its a matter of taste.
                        matt
                        Thats the way my grandmother taught me to make Greek coffee
                        Let it bubble up and take off the heat - do it 3 times and serve
                        One should note that you dont consume the coffee residue thats used for fortune telling
                        This is done by swirling the coffee thats left and turning the cup upside down
                        Let this dry and you have a patern of your future only known to those persons that can read it :

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                        • #13
                          Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                          And dont forget, if youre making Lebanese like Dolcimelo, to add the finely ground cardomon with the sugar. Its the critical differentating ingredient, although a bit addictive.

                          S

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                          • #14
                            Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                            Hi all

                            Several weeks ago I had run out of Bushels Turkish coffee and went to our deli that has all sorts of yummy things that we often buy. He has a quite beefy coffee grinder behind the counter. I asked if he had any Turkish coffee and he asked "whats that"?. I explained that Turkish coffee is really finely ground coffee. He was smiling ... you know when you get that feeling that your being had? I was about to go and he explained that he has "Lebanese coffee" :-) Its NOT Turkish coffee, they were having their coffee that way before the Ottomans invaded :-)

                            Mike

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                            • #15
                              Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

                              Here is a link on cardamon with reference to coffee
                              Its only 3/4 of a page and interesting

                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardamom

                              KK

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