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Blending beginner in Behmor

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  • Blending beginner in Behmor

    I have been roasting single origin blends in my Behmor for 6 months with results Im suprised and happy with (mostly!). I would like to venture into blending to expand my knowledge, but I keep wondering whether some beans roast faster than others, and if they do will you end up with a lopsided end result of uneven cooking?  Is there a general guide to matching origins, or do they all actually end up roasting the same once theyre in the machine? Any ideas would be appreciated before I purchase any more beans. 

  • #2
    Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

    have you read this thread yet?

    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1287301980

    My roasting history is like this.

    2 batches of Peru Ceja de Selva Estate and then KJM blends with these four beans in equal quantities
    Peru CSDE
    Mexico Yevi Navan Typica
    Malawi Nikya AA
    Balia Danau Batur

    Got some really nice, even looking roasts, although this pic doesnt really do it justice (iPhone).



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    • #3
      Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

      My experience is that in the Behmor, you are generally ok as long as the beans are of similar size/shape.

      I have had a lack of success when using a small bean (Guna Limmu) with a big bean (Malawi Nyika) for example. The roasts seem to get a bit uneven (which isnt necessarily a bad thing - just think what will happen if you get a big bean that hasnt hit 2nd crack, and a small bean that is well into it).

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      • #4
        Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

        Originally posted by 4D4858480F0 link=1309160596/0#0 date=1309160596
        but I keep wondering whether some beans roast faster than others, and if they do will you end up with a lopsided end result of uneven cooking?  Is there a general guide to matching origins, or do they all actually end up roasting the same once theyre in the machine?
        The thread Trent linked to is the one on the "KJM blend".. : In that thread (somewhere - it is rather long) there are some observations that the beans do seem to even up somewhat.

        One of the versions of that blend has the Ethiopian beans substituted by Yemenis. Now - Yemeni + Ceja together in the same roast seems counter intuitive to me, but it does seem to work.

        The only other thing Id say is that it really helps to have a pretty good idea of what each bean brings to the table before you whack them together. Unfortunately, Ive found that things like flavour and mouthfeel dont do the sensible thing when mixed, so it inevitably needs a bit of tweeking to get the blend right. Great fun though!

        Happy roasting!

        /Kevin

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        • #5
          Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

          Thanks for the tips, Ive been taking notes from everyone. I think Ill do some more research on learning the different bean types that are out there and just experiment. It makes sense I guess to keep bean sizes similar too. But now I have another question to ponder....how does one know a SOFT bean from a HARD bean???? Is it the country it comes from or just an individual bean thing? Can you tell from the bean itself, or do you have to know it from yhe name? So many questions...and things to learn and remember. :-/

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          • #6
            Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

            Originally posted by 70756575320 link=1309160596/4#4 date=1309239182
            how does one know a SOFT bean from a HARD bean
            i cant help much but this has been of interest to me also. i have no idea how to tell by looking at the bean! i just assume it isnt a hard bean unless stated specifically in some written form. these are things to look for:

            SHB (which i think is strictly hard bean)
            SHG (strictly high grown?)

            i see some bean descriptions mention the altitude grown but dont know what to do with this information

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            • #7
              Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

              Originally posted by 022B2E180A22223534470 link=1309160596/5#5 date=1309244187
              Originally posted by 70756575320 link=1309160596/4#4 date=1309239182
              how does one know a SOFT bean from a HARD bean
              i cant help much but this has been of interest to me also. i have no idea how to tell by looking at the bean! i just assume it isnt a hard bean unless stated specifically in some written form. these are things to look for:

              SHB (which i think is strictly hard bean)
              SHG (strictly high grown?)

              i see some bean descriptions mention the altitude grown but dont know what to do with this information
              exactly.
              SHB and SHG are pretty the same, just different country calls

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              • #8
                Re: Blending beginner in Behmor

                With regard to the hardness of green bean offerings, it would be best to take note of what Andy has discovered when cupping the bean. These notes are found below each bean in BeanBay when you click-on them...

                Basically though, really hard beans require more thermal energy than soft beans, to roast through properly. How you achieve this will depend on the type of home-roaster you use but in simple terms, more heat needs to be applied at the front end of the roast, say 10%...

                Soft beans require even more care as they can roast very quickly if not attended to vigilantly. Typically, soft-ish green beans are those grown at low altitudes, as many of the Brazil varieties are, for example.

                The whole process is very easily managed with the use of a CS DMM and the CS Roast Monitoring Software, as you can then track the roast progression and make small adjustments where needed. Without these aids/tools, you just need to be very watchful so as to take particular note of the various roast milestones to make sure the roast is staying on track. Its all a learning process but lots of fun....

                Mal.

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