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Portafilter layered coffees

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  • Portafilter layered coffees

    with a background in chemistry - and in particular liquid chromatography, I wondered what the result would be in layering the coffees that I had been blending (i.e. the traditional meaning of blending) directly in the portafilter. I had a blend of Indian Robusta and a monsooned malabar arabica that I quite liked. So I packed the portafilter with 9g of the Arabica, and then 3g of the Robusta on top - same grind fineness. The ratio was not quite the same as my normal blend. The result was interesting. My guess is that the extraction from the Robusta that then had to pass through the column of the Arabica saw some components of the Robusta "held" by the Arabica. Forget the technical chromatography explanation - what matters is how it tasted. My assessment was that this process had removed a lot of the "burnt tyres" from the result, but left the enhanced body that blending a little robusta typically gives. The clincher will be if this is reproducable and others agree that the result works! Any comments?

  • #2
    Hey! I'll try that and report back when I get my roaster.

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    • #3
      We need a double blind with:
      - arabica on top, robusta underneath
      - robusta on top, arabica underneath
      - just arabica
      This is something that could be done at a coffee snobs get together. It does need testers to be able to properly taste the coffees.

      Your idea of some components of robusta being held by the arabica is not without merit. If a bitter compound is released by the robusta and if that component is *absent* in the arabica and the temp is slightly *lower* there (i.e. further down the "column") then thatt compond could be adsorbed by the arabica bean surface. Similar concepts are applied in the Swiss water defcaf process.

      Mike (Physicist)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by speleomike View Post
        We need a double blind with:
        - arabica on top, robusta underneath
        - robusta on top, arabica underneath
        - just arabica
        This is something that could be done at a coffee snobs get together. It does need testers to be able to properly taste the coffees.

        Your idea of some components of robusta being held by the arabica is not without merit. If a bitter compound is released by the robusta and if that component is *absent* in the arabica and the temp is slightly *lower* there (i.e. further down the "column") then thatt compond could be adsorbed by the arabica bean surface. Similar concepts are applied in the Swiss water defcaf process.

        Mike (Physicist)
        Hiya Mike...

        Sounds more like chemistry mate...

        Mal.

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        • #5
          Yep- plenty of chemistry there...

          How much of each? How do you determine the optimum grind for each? You could potentially underextract one component whilst overextracting the other.

          How you you solve an equation with twice as many variables as we currently attempt to deal with?

          I reckon it will be one major challenge to produce meaningful results from this one...

          Regardless, I watch with interest. Have fun

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dimal View Post
            Hiya Mike...
            Sounds more like chemistry mate...
            Mal.
            Yeah, chemists and biologists need to do double blind experiments, physicists can trust their own judgement :-)

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            • #7
              Something that i love to do is grind together different coffee's. You can create some really surprising results.

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