Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advice on second green beans to buy.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Dimal View Post
    I guess you mean results in the cup???

    Robusta has long been the bean type that gives your favourite Italian coffee the extra "kick" and mouthfeel that we all love from this coffee. This is due to the much higher caffeine content and the thick, glutinous crema that Robusta is known for. Really high quality Robusta, such as that listed on BeanBay, can even be consumed as a Single Origin, if you like coffee that will put hairs on your chest. Not bad now and again but a bit too aggressive for daily consumption for most people.

    I personally enjoy a good Robusta in a blend up to a max. of ~15% but usually closer to 10%. A little works really well but too much, and you'll be lucky to pick-up on the intrinsic nuances of the Arabica proportion of the blend. Good Arabica beans will generally be sweeter, contain a variety of fruitiness and pleasant acidity, which is why they are the more sought after bean for most speciality coffee consumers. There is also a wider range of great beans to try as well, which can make one's personal coffee journey a very interesting one.

    Have a read through some of Andy's descriptors for the wide range of both Arabica and Robusta beans that are available in BeanBay. This will give you a good idea of what to expect.

    Cheers,
    Mal.
    Well said Mal, your a very patient man, I would have referenced Google.

    !0% Robusta is what I use in a roast once in a while to challenge the taste buds a little more.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
      What about if I didn’t want to blend and just wanted to try something different.
      ‘Would you guys recommend the Sulawesi blue or the Ethiopian Yirgacheffe for a different flavour to the Galeras?
      Definitely agree with Mal's suggestion of the Yirg but worthwhile getting both to help you educate your palate about the qualities of each. Then, when you are ready, try a 50/50 blend of Yirg and Sulawesi. Or if you still want to stick to one bean try a blend of a light roast and a dark roast of the Yirg for a another dimension.

      Comment


      • #18
        Thanks guys for the advice and Mal for explaining the difference between Robusta and arabica.
        Looks like I will be buying a fair bit of coffee from beanbay to try. Will get the Yirgacheffe and the Sulawesi blue and will look for a robusta bean as well. Cheers again.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
          Thanks guys for the advice and Mal for explaining the difference between Robusta and arabica.
          Looks like I will be buying a fair bit of coffee from beanbay to try. Will get the Yirgacheffe and the Sulawesi blue and will look for a robusta bean as well. Cheers again.
          I highly recommend the India monsoon Robusta - I've been using it at the same range that Mal suggested. It really gives the coffee a fantastic extra dimension - and of course some amazing crema.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by DaveD View Post
            I highly recommend the India monsoon Robusta - I've been using it at the same range that Mal suggested. It really gives the coffee a fantastic extra dimension - and of course some amazing crema.
            Another vote here for the Indian Monsoon - I found it to be great both as an addition to a blend, and on it's own.

            My wife rated it highly, too.

            Comment


            • #21
              I tried the Yirgacheffe but Im not really liking the floral flavours I get from it. What ratio should I blend it with my Colombian Volcan galleras to try and tame the floral notes?

              Also would roasting it for more or less ease the floral notes some what?

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
                I tried the Yirgacheffe but Im not really liking the floral flavours I get from it. What ratio should I blend it with my Colombian Volcan galleras to try and tame the floral notes?

                Also would roasting it for more or less ease the floral notes some what?
                Yirg is one of my favorites Truman, I don't get the floral notes you mention, are you roasting light? I take mine quite dark, as in Italian espresso dark, about CS9, could be worth a try.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                  Yirg is one of my favorites Truman, I don't get the floral notes you mention, are you roasting light? I take mine quite dark, as in Italian espresso dark, about CS9, could be worth a try.
                  Im just using a Kmart rotisserie oven so dont really Have any CS9 etc..lol. BUt I did roast it darker this time so I will see how it goes. How long do you age it before drinking?

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
                    Im just using a Kmart rotisserie oven so dont really Have any CS9 etc..lol. BUt I did roast it darker this time so I will see how it goes. How long do you age it before drinking?
                    The reference to CS 9 is just a Coffee Snobs grading for darkness of roast, one being lightest and I think 12 darkest almost burnt.

                    CS used to have a card available, no longer unfortunately.
                    This pic will give you an idea.
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	120_120_CScard.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	4.6 KB
ID:	749940

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Yelta View Post
                      The reference to CS 9 is just a Coffee Snobs grading for darkness of roast, one being lightest and I think 12 darkest almost burnt.

                      CS used to have a card available, no longer unfortunately.
                      This pic will give you an idea.
                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]22043[/ATTACH]
                      I couldnt see a large version of that chart so going off this one here my son says that the Colombian Volcan Galeras I did was abut a CS10 and the Yirgacheffe was a CS13.

                      http://www.theroasterie.com/blog/wp-...r-spectrum.png

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        So after Ive roasted them and Im waiting for them to release CO2 for 3 days or so is it ok to keep them in a zip lock bag so the CO2 can leak out?

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
                          I couldnt see a large version of that chart
                          see:
                          https://coffeesnobs.com.au/beanbay-b...ber-cards.html

                          There is a Zip file attached to that post with a higher resolution version (which is actually better than the original card)

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Truman49 View Post
                            So after Ive roasted them and Im waiting for them to release CO2 for 3 days or so is it ok to keep them in a zip lock bag so the CO2 can leak out?
                            For sure, as long as it has a one-way valve for the excess C02 to escape. It's also a good idea to seal the bag, as the zip locks are not fail-safe. If you don't have a bag sealer, you can use something like an iron.
                            The C02 can also help replace any 02 hanging about, keeping the beans fresher. Until you unseal it of course.

                            GrahamK

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by GrahamK View Post
                              For sure, as long as it has a one-way valve for the excess C02 to escape. It's also a good idea to seal the bag, as the zip locks are not fail-safe. If you don't have a bag sealer, you can use something like an iron.
                              The C02 can also help replace any 02 hanging about, keeping the beans fresher. Until you unseal it of course.

                              GrahamK
                              it doesn’t have a valve. But I ordered some from here and they should arr8ve tomorrow. Thanks.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Ziplock bags (that you put kids school lunch sandwiches in) are not the same thing as ziplock coffee bags.

                                Even without the valve, the coffee bags are actually 3 layers.

                                Inner layer is "food grade" and won't leach petrochemicals into the contents, next layer is foil to barrier air (in and out), third layer is PET (coke bottle) to give strength and flexibility. Add to that a valve to let CO2 out and not let air in and you have a high-tech storage container.

                                Some CS'rs are using freezer bags inside their valve coffee bags and getting many reuses out of them too.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X