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Sweet Marias Moka Kadir Blend

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  • Sweet Marias Moka Kadir Blend

    Hey fellow CSers!

    Just running some research for a new blend to try and came across this one on the Sweet Marias website that sounds great but cannot find the bean ratios!

    Has anyone had success replicating this?

    Cheers

    Mick

  • #2
    You'll go insane trying to replicate someone's blend with potentially different profiles and tastes!

    What's in it?

    Comment


    • #3
      Andy Oh I know, that's why I thought I'd check if anyone else has gone mad trying to do it first

      Their blog says they added a small amount of Brazil coffee to their moka java blend and roast to full city.

      My plan is to roast up 200g Brazil Yellow, 400g Yemen Mocha and 400g of either Sulawesi Rante or PNG Wahgi then play around with blend ratios!

      Comment


      • #4
        Can't help on the Moka Kadir blend but:--

        I have developed my Mocha blend from Beanbay beans.
        Ethiopian Gambella sundried 25% (poor mans Yemen)
        PNG Wahgi 23%
        Sulawesi Blue 20%
        Peru Ceja da Selva 32%
        I roast it just prior to second crack, have been roasting this blend for years.

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        • eaglemick
          eaglemick commented
          Editing a comment
          Nice one, my gut feel was around 30% Brazil for the Moka Kadir so that looks about right

      • #5
        Your plan sounds good but the Wahgi won't substitute well for the Sulawesi, very different styles but it doesn't mean it won't taste great.

        Blends I've created in the past have started with single origins roasted to their "ideal" profile and then many, many, many coffees made from different ratios with lots of tasting notes along the way. One of the first things you'll find is that while bean A and B are excellent single origins sometimes adding them together has unexpectedly bad results in the cup.

        I think of the process like a spice rack, each bean brings something to flavour party but it needs to add something better to the blend or you don't put it in there.

        Commercial roasters will typically add some lower cost beans with a neutral effect to bring the average kilo cost down, as a home roaster you don't have to do that as it's only cents difference not thousands of dollars over the year in lost profit or tighter margins.

        Brazil Yellow, Yemen, Sulawesi in those ratios will rock when you get the roast depth right. I would blend 50/50 Yemen and Sulawesi and then add some Brazil to see if improves or detracts.

        Any one of BeanBay's Gambella, Ardi, Shakisso, Harrar or Yemen blended with Sulawesi Blue or Torajah will work well as a Mokka base, adding other beans might or might not improve on it.


        Full City? Is that Kowloon or New York? Certainly not Sydney that's empty in lockdown.

        Comment


        • eaglemick
          eaglemick commented
          Editing a comment
          Cheers Andy, I was leaning towards Sulawesi so that's good

          The Shakisso sounds interesting, that's going in my next order

        • EfeCaner
          EfeCaner commented
          Editing a comment
          Andy can also use Sulawesi blue instead of rante? Or are they completely different beans? Cheers

      • #6
        Check this HB thread on other's attempts to recreate the SM Moka Kadir blend.

        Comment


        • eaglemick
          eaglemick commented
          Editing a comment
          Cheers flynnaus. That's interesting and contradicts their blog somewhat but I guess it's probably changed over time

      • #7
        I've never tried nor likely to try the Mocha kadit blend but inspired by this thread, I thought I would try my own variation made from 50% Yemen Mocha Ismaili, 25% Ethiopian Yirgacheffe Special Prep and 25% Peru Ceja de Selva..

        Drinking now 8 days post-roast as a 60ml lungo and finding it very enjoyable . Nice level of fruit cake/wine flavours enhanced by a nice balance of other flavours in the background. Nice length with some sweetness and a good level of acidity.. Worked better as an espresso than with milk


        I tried for the linear RoR as per the roast profile graph. Went a bit closer to 2nd crack than I intended but the result is excellent. Add this to my try again list. Talk amongst yourself for a while, I'm going back for another

        Click image for larger version

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        Comment


        • WhatEverBeansNecessary
          WhatEverBeansNecessary commented
          Editing a comment
          How big was your batch size?

        • flynnaus
          flynnaus commented
          Editing a comment
          500g green ending up with about 420g roasted assuming ~ 16% weight loss
          Yum, still enjoying the lingering flavours of this blend 45 mins later.

      • #8
        So I followed Andy's advice last week and played around with the blend ratios each day. Drove the missus mad all week mind

        The beans used were:

        Brazil Yellow Bourbon Especial - roasted to DTR 22%
        Yemen Mokha Selection Ismaili - roasted to DTR 24%
        Sulawesi Rante Kapua Torajah - roasted to DTR 30% (that wasn't the plan but the first batch got away from me as I wasn't paying attention!)

        Personally, I think the Sulawesi were a bit too dark for my tastes so the best blend was 1/3 of each!

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        • #9
          Yemen in a blend? I could never bring myself to put Yemen in a blend... It's just too good on its own!

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          • #10
            Originally posted by NewToEspresso View Post
            Yemen in a blend? I could never bring myself to put Yemen in a blend... It's just too good on its own!
            Fair point but I'm just going through two Moka Java blends at the moment.

            Blend 1 60% Yemen Hamasil / 40% Sulawesi Blue

            Blend 2 60% Ethiopia Shakiso / 40% Sulawesi Blue

            The Yemeni blend is soooo bloody good

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