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  • Colombian Supremo special roasting test

    Valle de Cauca
    Today I decided to roast a big batch of this wonderful coffee and - while timing- pull out a third of the beans after 1st crack is finished, a third after the first few pops of second crack and left the rest to go until they were really very full city! ;D
    What I want is to see what I can detect in the different roast profiles.
    Is this a usual thing people do or is this just stupid for some reason? :-X
    What do you think Ill discover?
    RH

  • #2
    Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

    Hi RH,

    Yep, Ive been doing a similar thing since shortly after I first started roasting my own. The only difference is, is that I do three separate roasts of small batches in a popper that is only good for about 80g per batch, and then cup each of them a couple or three times each to make sure I havent missed anything. Naturally, I note down my impressions in my roast log 8-) after cupping. I reckon its a good idea personally, at least youll create a record for all the bean varieties you manage to acquire at varying roast stages and then decide much more accurately, which way to go to fine-tune the roast to your specific palate.

    Good one mate [smiley=thumbsup.gif],
    Mal.

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    • #3
      Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

      Nice experiment RH! I applaud your efforts!

      Let us know how you go...I am really curious

      Avi

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      • #4
        Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

        Originally posted by rayzurhed link=1154004713/0#0 date=1154004713
        Valle de Cauca
        Today I decided to roast a big batch of this wonderful coffee and - while timing- pull out a third of the beans after 1st crack is finished, a third after the first few pops of second crack and left the rest to go until they were really very full city! ;D
        What I want is to see what I can detect in the different roast profiles.
        Is this a usual thing people do or is this just stupid for some reason? :-X
        What do you think Ill discover?
        RH
        Sounds like a true Coffee Snob practice to me! And indeed the smart thing to do, for *all your varietals.

        The flavors in the cup can vary dramatically with different roast levels and are especially noticable when dealing with Single Origin coffees. And are even more pronounced when theyre brewed as espressos.

        During the cold months here when Im drinking espressos/lattes I consistantly roast up a new bean at a variety of roast levels so-as to determine which works best for that bean and my tastes.

        During the hot summer months when the Cimbali is given a vacation and Im drinking Cold Process (http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1136514307/11#9) I do blends almost exclusively rather than SOs. Due to the large batch size (2.8kgs of green per batch) experimentation with different roast levels is not so easy. Hence most of my testing of varying roast levels is done during the winter and in the summer Im experimenting with different blends using the roasting profiles Ive established during the winter for the various beans.

        I really like my Gothot (http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1121040424) for this as it allows me to easily do up multiple small batches at varying roast levels during the winter when Im experimenting with new beans while also giving me the capasity for doing the large production roasting sessions required for my Cold Process batches.

        Ive found that a good database is an invaluable tool to track your beans and roasts. If youre running a computer with Access on it check out this database: http://improbablystructuredlayers.net/CoffeeRoastingDB/CRDBHome.htm It can be used to simply record your roasts or you can bring into play all its features and use it to track inventory, tasting notes, blends, and just about anything else you can think of. Ive found it to be a very nice tool and once the ins and outs of it are figured out a very easy tool to use.

        In response to your question of what do we think youll find, Ive found the Columbian coffees in general to be the lightest roasts I do. They seem to be very sensitive to the roast level and dont do well at the darker roasts, loosing many of their special flavors as you approach 2nd crack. My favorite Columbian is Mesa de los Santos (http://www.cafemesadelossantos.com/) and Ive found that it is at its best shortly past 1st crack and long before 2nd crack is reached. By the time 2nd crack is reached the coffee has lost most of its special characteristics.

        Good luck with your experiments and let us know what you find.

        Java "The roasting fool" phile
        Toys! I must have new toys!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

          COLOMBIAN LITE ROASTED JUST AS FIRST CRACK FINISHED- 48 HOURS ON.
          Well- here we go- after 48 hours resting- (the beans that is!) :
          The lite colombian has a woody smell- not bad actually.
          The creme is thin though and at first taste I notice a lemony essence around the sides of my tongue.
          This is not unpleasant at first.
          Then I notice as I breath out through my nose as sort of bready yeasty aroma- again not bad- but not really wonderful either.
          As I proceed down the cup the lemon pushes to slightly a sour finish. :P
          RH

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          • #6
            Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

            Sounds like it was pulled from the roaster a little too early RH.

            Try some more a little longer, too much lemon and yeast is a tad too close to green (for my taste and I suspect yours).

            Depending on your roasting methods the time that the beans are in the "sweet spot" can be very narrow but it is "findable".

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            • #7
              Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

              Hi Andy, Java, and RH,

              First thanks Andy for such rediculously fast delivery on the starter pack!

              I am wondering, the Columbian that I received in the starter pack was labelled exactly as such, just "Columbian".. is it more specifically this Columbian Supremo? I am trying to find out other peoples opinions and experiences with my "Columbian". Also how do I buy the stock I need for a good blend.. and I cant just blow torch the lot in one bowl can I? I have to do three or four seperate batches to roast the beans to their individual profiles right.. Do you all roast four batches a week?

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              • #8
                Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

                THanks Andy- yeah quite a bit too soon I reckon.
                Andrew- its up to you- I like to throw it all in together and roast it all up! ;D
                But I perhaps am not as snobby as some :
                try it out both ways and let us know.


                OK here is the colombian medium sample...
                a nicer woody note in the cup.
                A fuller creme but not what Id call a thick brew.
                Still a touch of lemon but more of a buttery feel.
                Not distinctly "coffee" flavoured and missing those wonderful fruity nuances that other beans bring- to be expected-
                just sort of blandish- soounds terrible I know. I think Im so used to a blend I wouldnt knwo a single origin if it lept up and bit me.
                ALSO something I failed to mention before.
                Silvia is PIDd to 94 so whether that has anything to do with the sample I dont know.
                RH

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                • #9
                  Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test



                  Hi RH,
                  Silvia is PIDd to 94 so whether that has anything to do with the sample I dont know.
                  What do you mean by this?
                  My understanding is that set point for the boiler temp. should be about 108 C. to achieve a 95 C. temp at the puck!
                  But maybe that is what your talking about.
                  Bruce


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                  • #10
                    Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

                    Rayzurhead, I dont think that columbian is ever really going to get you a thick mouthfeel. Your comments about it being lemony and sour sound like you could bump our PID up a bit. This should calm down the acidity and bring out a bit more sweetness. Most of the columbian stuffola that I have tried has been relatively low in body, with a nice acidity, clean finish and a decidedly single-note flavour. Dont worry about temps that people recommend - go by taste. Last week I had to brew an Australian coffee at 97C!

                    I am wondering, the Columbian that I received in the starter pack was labelled exactly as such, just "Columbian".. is it more specifically this Columbian Supremo? I am trying to find out other peoples opinions and experiences with my "Columbian". Also how do I buy the stock I need for a good blend.. and I cant just blow torch the lot in one bowl can I? I have to do three or four seperate batches to roast the beans to their individual profiles right.. Do you all roast four batches a week?
                    (a) Your columbian is probably the last one polled (Valle de la Cauca). Supremo really doesnt give much information; its just the grade and the grading systems vary a lot form country to country.

                    (b) Every month coffeesnobs has a poll for four or so different coffees. Buy some, experiment, play around. Once you know what you like, youll know what to buy in bulk for your blends next time the poll comes around. There are other places that you can buy beans from, like www.coffeehit.com.au, one of our site sponsors, or maybe befriending your local roaster, but none of them can compete with Coffeesnobs polls for price. Plus Andy does a great job of selecting good coffees for us.

                    (c) Dont use a blowtorch!

                    (d) The safest way to go is to roast each origin individually, but some beans roast very similarly and can be blended together before roasting. These are usually beans of the same size, density, water content, hardness, etc. Sometimes you can blend beans that roast at different speeds together if you want the softer beans to be darker than the harder beans. It just takes a bit of experience ... and good record keeping is definitely a plus! Personally, I tend not to roast more than once. Sometimes Ill do a hard and a soft lot and blend them together. I do have blend ideas that could use up to four different roasts, at different times, but with a 500g roaster theyre not feasible.

                    Hope that helps,

                    Luca

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                    • #11
                      Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

                      Ahhh- perhaps the temp is too low?
                      Actually- I will bump it up a bit and see if that alters anything. But I suspect that the roast was extended too long and that might have contributed to it.
                      I roasted a beaut on on Monday and tried it this morning and it is THE best blend Ive ever tasted so that leads me to think the experiement colombian might have been far too slow a roast.
                      I will persist.
                      RH

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                      • #12
                        Re: Colombian Supremo special roasting test

                        I just roasted a batch of Supremo and most of the time when I do roast this coffee I notice the oils in the coffee are visible on the bean just before the second pop. Is this normal? I usually like a medium (city) roast where the oil appears on a few beans!

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