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Ethiopia Bensa Sagara

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  • Ethiopia Bensa Sagara

    Roasted 300g of Bensa Sagara a few days ago, did a ten minute roast to a lively first crack and quickly cooled them for filter brewing.
    Greens had a fruity aroma and when unloading them from the cooler they a fragrant fruity aroma.
    Ran them through the Clever dripper today 30g to 400ml water and 1m30sec brew time.
    Very clean and sweet with velvety mouthfeel, lovely stonefruit flavours and a nice finish.
    You have done it again Andy!!

  • #2
    I'm loving this one too, I actually have a Brazen filter of it beside me at the moment.

    Smells amazing.

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    • #3
      This is definitely another Ethiopian stunner - up there with the Sidamo Ardi and Biftu Gesha!

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      • #4
        Have been enjoying it as cold brew this week, the flavours really stand out!!

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        • #5
          I learned about these Ethiopians with the Sidamo. I bought 5kg of that when it came out, now it's out of stock and may not make it back this season. I'm in danger of running out.

          So I bought 5kg of the Bensa Sagara based on Andy's write up and now I've worked my way through two 333g batches I bought 5kg more. It'll make a rather handy substitute as and when I run out of Sidamo.

          Now up to 52 varieties in the cupboard, totalling 103kg. That's about two year's supply so I'd better reign it in... yeah right. Until a new variety lands.

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          • #6
            Into some of these beauties. I did a relatively gentle ramping profile (for an Ethiopian) and dropped a little before 2C at around 215.5°. While I wasn't expecting the huge fruit I'm hearing about with this type of profile, I did get a creamy, thick body (almost like the latest batch of Waghi!) and a lovely smooth choc bomb in the cup, but without any hint of the baking I'd expect from a slower roasted Harrar. So I'm thinking it's like a combo of and early-peaking Yemen and some Gambella without the fruit-cake! Great bean for a true Mocha Java explosion

            Next time I'll try to explore a faster roast and lighter drop…

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            • #7
              I just roasted it at 100% from start, dropped to 50% at first crack and 25% at rolling first crack, dropped it about 20 seconds short of second crack. Makes a great flat white. Bought some more. I'm heading overseas in a few weeks, might take a few bags with me to go in the Flair.

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              • #8
                Anyone having this as an espresso?

                I find myself using high ratios and longer brew times to balance the acid to sweetness,

                Really liking this one!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by 392392 View Post
                  Anyone having this as an espresso?

                  I find myself using high ratios and longer brew times to balance the acid to sweetness,

                  Really liking this one!
                  I ended up doing a faster roast of this bean (well, faster than the one I roasted earlier!) and certainly found it now had lots of lovely sweet, fruity acidity as espresso. I always use pretty slow pours anyway, and they certainly responded well to this bean. Not quite Yirg-like citrus flavours, but more stone fruit. And makes a lovely milk based brew too!

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                  • #10
                    After reading these posts I tried some Bensa Sagara roasted by Andy. My palate is lets say, 'still learning the nuances of flavour' so my descriptions are quite simple but I know something I like when I taste it.

                    This bean I really enjoyed. I tried it as cold brew but mostly I drank it as an Aeropress brew. The overwhelming flavour (and smell when griding) I notices was blueberries. Delicious!

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                    • #11
                      Glad you liked my roast!

                      It smells like a bag of mixed lollies when you crack the bag open, sweet, fruity, berries. It's a real experience and the perfect thing to give someone who says "coffee tastes like coffee".

                      Enjoy!

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                      • #12
                        Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by robusto View Post
                          Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.
                          I disagree, while you might think that specific and technical data will help it's actually more likely to drive you insane chasing someone else's setup, environmental conditions, brew methods and importantly tastes!

                          Many of the posts in this thread describe shorter and faster roasts and for my taste that how I did it too but the real reason that you home roast is to do something that tastes good to you.

                          Use your own "known good" method on any new bean then Goldilocks it by doing one lighter and one darker and see where your tastes prefer. You can then tinker around that roast to perfect it.

                          There is no "correct answer" , just what you like.

                          This bean is one of those that works well through a wide range of roast depths and many different brew methods.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by robusto View Post
                            Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.
                            Very true, for the few that bother to fill out a profile it would be a good idea to provide details of your roasting setup, I've just amended mine, only thing not there are times, obviously this varies with weather, type of beans and the type of roast your aiming for.

                            PS Just read Andy's comments, valid points.

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                            • #15
                              Andy, Yes, it is all about what works for someone.

                              But also I would have thought that one of the reasons we are all here is to share our experience, learn from one another.

                              I have certainly learned from others' experience with a Behmor, for instance.

                              But even leaving learning aside, I find it impossible to visualise that the poster is writing about if I don't know what equipment he/she is using.

                              Why mention that it took so many minutes to first crack, then dropped the temperature so much till second --- if they are the only one meant to
                              benefit from that method on whatever equipment they are using?

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