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Thread: Roasting in a residential area

  1. #1
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    Roasting in a residential area

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi Guys,
    Im about to start roasting from a shed in my backyard with a 10kg roaster.
    Its a residential area and it is prohibited by council.
    I was going to start roasting and plead ignorance if the council ever knocked on my door - but Im starting to feel uneasy about this and will probably apply for a permit or rent a shed in an industrial location.
    Id like to know how many roasters started out by ignoring council warnings and ran a roaster from the backyard.
    Were you caught out?
    Id also like to hear from those that have proceeded to get council approval - what was required?
    And finally how many roast on a 10kg or less roaster with an Afterburner?

    Cheers!

  2. #2
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    A 10kg is a biggy to run from home... 5kg max, you could get away with it.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Dont worry about the council,their fines pale in comparison with the EPAs.There is a reason why we have light industrial/commercial zones.Then there are building,health,workplace health and safety,insurance issues etc.......Even a 2kg roaster produces enough smoke to cover 5 hectares of area.The smell of roasted coffee travels even further.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Good question.

    And the answer is:

    As elbeano stated its the EPA you need to be worried about.

    And they will find out......they respond to complaints. Someone in reasonable proximity to you (ie one of your neighbours) WILL complain, and you will get a knock on the door.

    If no one complains you will be left to do your own thing ad infinitum but note...this is not likely.

    They will come and see you EVEN if you are in an industrial area if your neighbours complain...being in an industrial area is no defence.

    Regardz,
    FC.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I know of a guy running a 10kg roaster in a shop. Not much smoke, no afterburner and no visits from the EPA...yet!

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    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I dont undrestand why you might consider establishing a commercial enterprise, and knowingly do something that is illegal. Or why would you want to inconvenience your neighbours and create a bad reputation at the outset?

    Maybe you should allow that uneasy feeling you are experiencing to come to the forefront so that you can do what is right.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by fenners link=1193365321/0#4 date=1193385847
    I know of a guy running a 10kg roaster in a shop. Not much smoke, no afterburner and no visits from the EPA...yet!
    My guess is that he has the right exhaust extraction pipes/fans etc etc that do not send emissions into the neighbourhood.

    Even roasting 300 - 500 grams in a Coretto stinks, and I am very conscious of when I am roasting in my back garden so as not to stink the neighbours, and I live on a large block.

    I dont want to offend you but I think you are being arrogant if you assume you can do whatever you want in your back shed regardless of
    1) The law & the EPA, and
    2) Your neighbours who may experience breathing difficulties as a result of inhaling the fumes from the roaster.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Hi Fenners,

    With all due respect, I think this is a recipe for disaster, not to mention hugely inconsiderate of your neighbours.

    If you dont set yourself or one of them on fire, you can start saving now for the big fine that you will receive from the EPA when somebody complains- and believe me, somebody is guaranteed to complain.

    Then, assuming that you can get public liability insurance, the insurance company wont pay out because you wont have any permits to conduct what is an illegal activity. One or more of your neighbours will most likely sue you. How deep are your pockets?

    There is a great case study in Tasmania with a roaster who had done all of the required homework and got everything in order. He still rubbed the locals up the wrong way. I suggest you find it and read it as a matter of extreme urgency.

    For mine, it doesnt take much effort to do the right thing and we here at CS like to consider others in the ways we operate. As a consumer, I would be unprepared to purchase brown beans produced by means which are highly unethical...

    Sorry to rant, but thats the way I feel.....Do it right, or dont do it and save yourself the court costs.

    2mcm

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Arrogant? Yes. Who isnt. Now please no guessing.
    A wise man once said it is always better to ask than to make assumptions.
    In future I will add more detail to my posts to assist people in making informed comment rather than assumptions.
    I understand that environmental issues provoke strong debate but please understand that I havent yet started this venture (and its not yet a commercial venture) - I want to hear from others with similar experience and factual advice.

    SO, has anyone actually tried this or am I the first person to give it a go? Has anyone had the same idea and thought better of it?

    I have asked this question because I dont want to upset the neighbours and dont want to create a bad reputation. I dont really want to know what people think about the idea, just have you tried it - yes - great tell me about your experience. Or no - ok move on to the next post, no comment required thank you.

    Firstly, Im not stupid. I dont want to kill my children, my wife, my neighbours or myself from roasting - Im trying to learn about the emissions, their effect on the environment and how they compare to other generally accepted emissions eg log fires. Any help on this learning curve would be appreciated. I also dont want to burn my house down. Duh!

    I am trying to improve the quality of coffee in my area, but its going to be a slow process. You cant change people overnight and consequently I dont see the value in outlaying thousands for an industrial setup from day one.
    At this stage it is all a hobby for me.
    I intend to start slow and small - I wont be roasting 24/7 - I will practice my craft and hopefully sell a few bags along the way as I build up my reputation.
    My knowledge and experience gained thus far from speaking with people in the roasting industry tells me that initially my roasting wont cause too much nuisance however, I do intend to be successful so at some point in the future my roasting time will increase and with that will come an increase in pollution. I am trying to get more of an idea from others experience, say experience, of when that time might come so I can make an informed decision on:
    A) Go ahead and give it a go, then get permits if I consider it a viable commercial venture
    B) Get permits
    C) Get an afterburner then A or B
    D) Install some sort of commercial rangehood-style device that would provide a suitable pollutant filter then A or B

    Hopefully that all makes sense and gets things back on the right track.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    http://www.news.com.au/mercury/story/0,22884,17886647-3462,00.html

    http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/worldregional/australasia/208302

    Theres two links for the case in question.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I know a guy that resides in a semi rural area and roasts on a 10 or 15kg roaster without and afterburner... Its not a farm but the blocks are fairly large.
    Another roaster I know of uses a 12kg roaster without an afterburner in what you might call a semi commercial zone. There are houses and restaurants in the general vicinity. He has been roasting for a few years now. Ive been 4 blocks away and was able to smell the roast smoke. Ive often wondered how it hasnt been an issue for him.

    Id like to know what if any comparison can be made between roaster smoke and wood burning fires. Im guessing roaster smoke is a little more toxic, but in winter wood fires seem so ubiquitous.



  12. #12
    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    "Its a residential area and it is prohibited by council.
    I was going to start roasting and plead ignorance if the council ever knocked on my door.... Id like to know how many roasters started out by ignoring council warnings and ran a roaster from the backyard.
    Were you caught out?..."

    You know what....I was trying to be diplomatic before, but truth is, I really find this offensive. You say you want to improve the quality of coffee in your area? Then go to Council, EPA, etc. like anyone ethical person would.

    I dont think we need the likes of this thread here!

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Hey Fenners - looks like youve inflamed a few passionate responses here mate!

    Consumers are increasingly embracing products that have an ethical & environmentally friendly aspect about them - witness the growing interest in Fairtrade & organic coffee for instance. I believe that commercial roasters who can demonstrate their commitment & investment in significantly reducing toxic emissions in their operation will surely be a drawcard for consumers. Thinking environmental is wise marketing - if you integrate it as a core part of your roasting venture, then it will reap marketing rewards down the track as consumers see your ethical point-of-difference.

    Heres another interesting read (albeit American):

    http://www.roastmagazine.com/backissues/septoct2006/blowingsmoke.html

    Fenners, hows this for an idea ... You say that youre keen on eventually making roasting a full-on commercial venture, but will start off slow & small and until then will practise your craft. A 10kg roaster seems to me pretty big for a small beginning. Why not have a much smaller 1-2kg capacity roaster in your (well ventilated) shed to hone your skills/blends, pre-empt grief from pissed-off neighbours, give samples to cafes in your area, & if they come screaming back for more rent out space in an industrial zone (AFTER getting all required permits) & THEN let your 10kg beast roar!

    You mentioned that a wise man once said its always better to ask questions rather than make assumptions. Well, love thy neighbour is another wise ditty I recall some wise dude once uttering. ;)

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Something that also came to mind is the intention of selling to a few people.

    If you intend on doing this, then doesnt it make your hobby or experiment a commercial venture?

    Once you start venturing into that territory, you need to get permits, an ABN and pay taxes etc.

    If mr Taxman even suspects you are selling something to people whether it is experimaental or not, for profit or not, you may get yourself into an awful lot of hot water as Mr Taxman doesnt like people keeping money from him, no matter if you plead ignorance hobby experiment or whatever, you may findyourself in bucket loads of trouble.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Mr Taxman doesnt like people keeping money from him, no matter if you plead ignorance hobby experiment or whatever, you may findyourself in bucket loads of trouble.

    Hey Lucinda, might start calling my wife The Taxman - she doesnt like me witholding money from her, even when I plead ignorance, or that I need the money for my hobby (more green beans pllleeeease shnookums ...), and yes I find myself in bucket loads of trouble! ;D

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by lucinda link=1193365321/0#6 date=1193445997
    2) Your neighbours who may experience breathing difficulties as a result of inhaling the fumes from the roaster.
    As it so happens,

    I am a severe chronic asthmatic and if you were doing this in my neighbourhood and causing me grief, I would make it my business to seek you out and bring forth representatives from all the Govt acronyms that may have an interest and when theyre finished with you, my lawyers would be in contact with you seeking recompense for the extra hardship and life endangerment you visited upon my person. If this isnt enough to make you think about doing the right thing then I think you need to keep all future incomprehensible and negligent personal projects to yourself...

    Cheers,
    Mal.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Totally concur Mal - one of my 3yr old boys is asthmatic. Its distressing enough (for him & his parents) to deal with an attack, so such a billowing smoke stack in my neighbouring vicinity would definitely have a petition up & running for immediate closure.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Yes mate,

    Its very distressing when one of your kids has this horrible condition. Our youngest boy had it from a very young age and thankfully, doesnt suffer from it anywhere near as much as he used to. To watch him turn blue and fight for breath is something I wouldnt wish on anyone and if this was due to someone elses utter negligence, then God help them....

    Mal.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Luckily my lads asthma is relatively mild, & we live 5mins from a Childrens Hospital - but he still carries his puffer on him always.

    Fenners, think the possibility of class-action suit as a short answer to your ethical dilemma ...

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    fenners I was thinking the same as G.O.D.; youve stirred up some passions.
    I also think that 10kg is a bit beyond hobby at this point.

    I was also going to suggest a 2kg roaster would be a smaller toe to dip in the water.

    And as for my opinion on dotting all the Is and crossing all the Ts, Im an auditor so...you guessed it....I say do it.

    Good luck with it too.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Thanks for all your comments, I am wiser for them.
    I would just like to add that I believe many people in this forum need to be more considerate in their responses to peoples posts, particularly newbies. Criticism and disagreement can be written respectfully and I certainly have a greater respect and give more weight to those comments written with decorum.

    Interestingly, today I remembered my visit to the Skybury plantation and chatting to a lady there named Debbie. She raved about Coffeesnobs and how she enjoyed learning so much from this site. So I did a search on her and found that she hasnt posted in almost a year, after Skybury was critically attacked in her post. Her colleague Baristotle who was personally attacked in the same post also hasnt been back.
    I wonder what has happened to them and I find it very unfortunate that they are no longer active members of the forum.
    During my visit to Skybury I noted that Skybury were doing MANY things right and MANY good things for Coffee in this country and better still they were willing to learn more. Why should they only open their doors when they have perfected ALL arts of coffee - who has done this anyway?
    We should be embracing and encouraging newbies, not ripping them down.

    Anyone who visits this forum and takes the time to post obviously wants to improve his/her coffee skills.
    We arent all experts and these skills cant be gained overnight.

    I only hope as I become a greater part of this coffeesnob culture that I remember that we are all coffee LOVERS!
    PEACE! ;)

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area


    I suggest you return your initial post in this thread to see why you attracted the response you got.

    To paraphrase:

    "I want to annoy my neighbours and do something that is both silly, known to be illegal and will show home coffee roasters in the worst possible light"

    Did you really hope to get positive pats on the back?

    If you start a new thread asking for suggestions about setting-up a legitimate roastery Im sure the responses would be far better!


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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quite a good post and some valid points made.
    However, the auditor that I am has to disagree with one thing you said.

    Quote Originally Posted by fenners link=1193365321/15#20 date=1193573384
    Anyone who visits this forum and takes the time to post obviously wants to improve his/her coffee skills.
    Some come here to push their own agenda.
    Sometimes its obvious at other times not.
    They come and go quickly.

    The ones that stick around really do have something to contribute and learn.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I think that paraphrase is most unfair, particularly from a member of Admin.
    I wish it to be made clear that I am trying to do the right thing here and thats why I posed the question - perhaps not worded correctly - but with attempts to clarify myself I had hoped you would all read it as I intended.
    Anyway, whether or not I am a fool I still maintain that there is a right way to tell someone and a wrong way.

    I would like to add that I have contacted the EPA and there are no guidelines available for setting up a coffee roaster nor any other guidelines that would be suitable. I was advised to go back to council and speak to the planning department. I asked what would happen if I began roasting and someone made a complaint and was told that they would refer the matter back to council.
    I then spoke to council and was told that I do not require a permit because my floor space is less than one third of my property, I wont have two or more employees and I wont have people come to my property to buy the beans. They were supportive of my idea and wished me every success.
    I never intend to break the law, but my post was made because of horror stories about my local council and the difficulties they have caused other startup businesses re. planning permits. There is a definite grey area with coffee roasters that start as a hobby and I wanted to hear about some real life experiences from other roasters that have started this way so I could perhaps prepare an argument for council.
    As it turned out I had no issues whatsoever and a very pleasant experience with the council and with the EPA and while I enjoy hearing others opinions you cant beat getting the facts straight from the horses mouth!


  25. #25
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by fenners link=1193365321/15#23 date=1193620067
    I think that paraphrase is most unfair, particularly from a member of Admin.
    .....I was advised to go back to council and speak to the planning department. I asked what would happen if I began roasting and someone made a complaint and was told that they would refer the matter back to council....
    For me Fenners, there lies the issue...

    Councils are notorious for changing their minds. You may find that the planning dept. has a different view.

    Nevertheless, good luck which ever way you ultimately proceed.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    fenners, Id be getting what Council said in writing... then move forward... Chris is correct, Councils are horror stories just be being councils and WILL change there minds.

    Humour... Go ask Senator Bob Brown if he supports you? hehehehe, if we all submitted to his train of thought, this country would be 3rd world in economic scale... sorry... went off topic... sorta... ;-)

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Good luck with the home roasting fenners, the only advice Ill give is that a reputation takes a lifetime to build and a few seconds to destroy - Id recommend starting small even if you dont foresee problems with the council!

    <OT>

    Quote Originally Posted by 2muchcoffeeman link=1193365321/0#7 date=1193450054
    There is a great case study in Tasmania with a roaster who had done all of the required homework and got everything in order. He still rubbed the locals up the wrong way. I suggest you find it and read it as a matter of extreme urgency.
    FWIW, I wouldnt take the Oomph experience as a general case study. Battery Point has to be the hardest suburb in Australia to get a business off the ground simply because the Battery Point Planning Commission exists to prevent any progress or change in the suburb. As pointed out in the Coffeegeeks thread, theyve also shut down a florist and chocolatier in Hampten road. They are currently fighting tooth-and-nail to stop a foreshore walkway that would cut across the absolute waterfront of some of Hobarts most expensive properties. ::)

    </OT>

  28. #28
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcS link=1193365321/15#25 date=1193621942
    Humour... Go ask Senator Bob Brown if he supports you? hehehehe, if we all submitted to his train of thought, this country would be 3rd world in economic scale... sorry... went off topic... sorta... ;-)
    Thems fighting words ;)

    But lets not get political - enough angst flying around in this thread already! :o

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    That Oomph case was an joke and VERY unaustralian. Im really pleased they got through it.

    OK, no more fighting words... I do feel itis relevant though in the context of this discussion regards EPAs/\/Councils etc...

    This country needs to be pro small business, and should be.

    Andy, how did you get through your process of installing your Has-Garanti 10KG jobby with Council...

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by 2muchcoffeeman link=1193365321/15#24 date=1193621018
    Councils are notorious for changing their minds. You may find that the planning dept. has a different view.
    Great points. Fenners, if you havent already done so, could I suggest that you get all of your correspondence with the council and the EPA down in writing. That way at least you have something to fall back on when and if they change their mind.

    The council and EPA will tell you what the regulations are, but in terms of safety I really think that you ought to contact some professional roasters who have experienced roaster fires. And by that, I mean actually make the trip to go and visit them, check out their equipment and talk to them in person.

    I still maintain that there is a right way to tell someone and a wrong way.
    Well, I hope that this is the right way to tell you this ...

    On the other forum, you got a response from a well respected professional roaster that included, amongst the rest of it, this:

    Start half arsed stay half arsed.. thats just my thoughts..
    In this thread you had a response from another experienced and well respected commercial roaster: (;P)

    If you start a new thread asking for suggestions about setting-up a legitimate roastery Im sure the responses would be far better!
    Then you had a deity say this:

    Some come here to push their own agenda.
    Sometimes its obvious at other times not.
    They come and go quickly.

    The ones that stick around really do have something to contribute and learn.
    The question that no-one is asking seems to be this: Professional roasters spend years learning how to extract, taste and roast coffee. You bought a domestic espresso machine and grinder this month. So how are you going to actually learn what you need to in order to be able to sell coffee to your customers with a straight face?

    Im sorry to put it bluntly like that, but I think that a lot of the responses that you have gotten have to be put in the context of not understanding that rather fundamental aspect of your plan. And Im sure that youll find no shortage of people who would be more than happy to help you out if youre prepared to put the work in, but in the absence of any idea that you are actually prepared to do the hard yards (or have already done them), I think that you would have to expect some measure of cynicism.

    Cheers,

    Luca

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Yup the EPA have no guidelines for setting up roasting equipment.....

    The roaster is expected to know what is required, and as most ("developed") countries selling roasting equipment will tell you what is required (because they want to sell it to you), this is why the roaster is expected to know what to do !

    No one in their right mind in a developed country will set up equipment in a city and not include anti pollution gear.

    The EPA as stated previously responds to complaints. They dont need to know or care about how the equipment is set up, they only need to know if the equipment is not working properly because if it was, your neighbours wouldnt be complaining after you start running the thing.

    The EPA does on the other hand have guidlelines about what can and cant be done to pollute the air we breathe. They also have guidelines that tell them how your afterburnmer should be running (ie at what temperature) or be hooked up, so that no material or smell escapes.

    This means that if someone complains, but you are running an afterburner, but the neighbours still complain, they will turn up and ask to view your electronic controller or printouts or log book to check at what temperature you have been running the afterburner. *It might not have been switched on or it might be running at a lower temp than is required under their draft regulations. Not to mention that if you do have an afterburner, but it is NOT INTERLOCKED to run with the roaster (or is being run at a lower temp than they require) *then you are a very naughty boy and will get your fingers smacked by them because you are not supposed to be able to run the roaster without the afterburner......

    After that as others have said..they (council / EPA / whoever) will all point the finger back at eachother. Youre only form of defense is for you to make sure you are doing the RIGHT THING and the onus is on you to work out what that is.

    If all this is about running a 10 kilo roaster as a hobby, my advice would be to sell the thing and buy something more appropriate (much smaller) that wont give all this angst.

    If all this is about starting up a business, I fear you wont be able to find anyone that has the knowledge (ie profesisonal roasters) , to just hand over years worth of hard earned experience (and the basis of their ability to earn an income) to yet another newcomer to enter the business.


    Regardz,
    FC.

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Great post FC ....

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Aw shucks thanks for that Marc!

    Regardz,
    FC.

  34. #34
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcS link=1193365321/15#28 date=1193622928
    That Oomph case was an joke and VERY unaustralian. Im really pleased they got through it.

    OK, no more fighting words... I do feel itis relevant though in the context of this discussion regards EPAs/\/Councils etc...

    This country needs to be pro small business, and should be.

    Andy, how did you get through your process of installing your Has-Garanti 10KG jobby with Council...
    All in good humour :)

    Sorry to go O/T again... but did BeanBay get involved in the Oomph saga? Or was it more a general comment? I wouldve thought the greens would back small business to the hilt...

    Agree completely WRT small business - particularly so in Tassie where big business demands ride roughshod over wineries, bed & breakfasts etc... But hey, I wasnt going to get political! :-X

    A joke and VERY unaustralian is the best description for the BPPC Ive heard! :)

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    No idea on BeanBay and the Oomph saga... more a general comment...

    And the Greens getting behind small business... not so sure... theyre against anything that emits! If you Fart, they want to know about it!...

  36. #36
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Fair enough :)

    I promised I wouldnt get political... so Ill just grit my teeth instead! ;)

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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    This is more of what I was expecting!! Cheers guys, thanks for the great feedback.

    Luca, I respect what you have to say and enjoy reading your blog.
    If I can just answer your query,
    "So how are you going to actually learn what you need to in order *to be able to sell coffee to your customers with a straight face? "

    Im going to learn over time, through trial and error and listening and asking questions to as many people as I can find.
    In my initial 3 year plan I dont intend to sell my coffee to cafes. Im aiming at the home consumer. No-one I know has a LM FB80 at home. Most use Sunbeams, Brevilles, press or filter brewing methods.
    I have responded to Peter Wolffs cupping course and am very much looking forward to that and will be on the lookout for similar events. Im also looking for a roasting mentor whom Im happy to negotiate a fair price with.

    FC and others, I take on board everything you say, but Im going to have a go at this with a 10kg roaster and hope for the best. I was very close to buying a 5kg roaster but after speaking with an experienced Yucel roaster I decided to go with a 10kg. Time will tell and Ill be here to tell it - unless my shed burns down!! :o

    Note: I am in the process of speaking with my neighbours. If they raise any issues which we are unable to resolve I will not proceed. I am installing a cyclone, afterburner and flue to the highest legal height. I will be trained in cleaning my machine and will follow a regular cleaning schedule. Everything will be installed by professional electricians and gasfitters. Im awaiting written confirmation from council and I will also have my shed safety checked by the fire brigade. Have I missed anything?


  38. #38
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    If the shed burns down, perhaps you could change your forum name to Embers ;)

  39. #39
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Fenners - have you done any sort of roasting at all previous to this?

    I have been using the popper coming up to 12 months and have just started with the Coretto. It is only the last couple of months that I feel confident enough to even give away beans that I have roasted to people. Over the last year that I have been doing this I have been doing a lot of research and spent hours on the net reading about roasting coffee and asking questions here and elsewhere. I still feel that I have a long way to go.

    I have heard a roaster who has been roasting 10+ years say that he is still learning and he is one of the best roasters in Adelaide.

    Roasting coffee in a home situation is totally different to roasting coffee in a commercial situation.

    Quote:
    If all this is about starting up a business, I fear you wont be able to find anyone that has the knowledge (ie profesisonal roasters) , to just hand over years worth of hard earned experience (and the basis of their ability to earn an income) to yet another newcomer to enter the business.


    I hope you are taking this advice seriously. Over the years, especially in Karate, I have seen people who get involved in something full of excitement and are dead keen and after the novelty and excitement wears off and they realise that it takes a hell of a lot of hard work and intense commitment (not just throwing money at it) over many many years they just drift away.

    Just like a martial art, coffee roasting is an art and it also requires years and years of dedication, learning and commitment. Thats why there are only a few really fantastic commercial roasters around.




  40. #40
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I like the martial arts analogy cindy.
    fenners may not know as you do, but Ive been learning karate for over 30 years.
    Learning about this coffee stuff (including roasting) for just over 1 year and am an auditor.

    So as lucinda pointed out, they all take dedication, following a process and probably being anal helps. *;D

  41. #41
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    I am surprised at what i am reading on this forumn. This guy is just trying to have a go at an honest living. He has taken the right avenue by asking experienced people on this site for advice and is getting a lot of negative feedback. How do you think all the experienced roasters gained their experience.? Someone had to train them.

    I can understand the roasters close to fenners would feel threatened. But thats the way this democratic society operates. Anyway thats my 5c worth.

    All the best in your new venture mate.

  42. #42
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Quote Originally Posted by MarcS link=1193365321/30#34 date=1193630817
    And the Greens getting behind small business... not so sure... theyre against anything that emits! If you Fart, they want to know about it!...
    Not entirely true... teeth firmly grinding. :-X :)



  43. #43
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Greg41, I think the overwhelming tone of responses to this blokes venture has been an honest appraisal of what hes intending to do, with some bloody good thoughts from experienced roasters (industry pros & home-roasters to boot ;)) expressing their take on his business entity.

    I feel the feedback is essentially negative not from what he wants to do, but the way he wants to do it!

    Lucinda, ya hit the proverbial on the proverbial ... fenners, have you actually roasted before?

    If not, a 10kg beast will surely be unforgiving?

    Ill re-iterate what I said, respectfully, in a previous post - mate, go smaller initially to learn/perfect the craft, then think big (away from my home, thankyou :))


  44. #44
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Re: Roasting in a residential area

    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Thread locked on a positive note
    (albeit late)

    Andy.



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