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Thread: Where to buy food grade grease

  1. #1
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    Where to buy food grade grease

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Im rebuilding Silvias leaky steam wand and the o-rings and washer just arrived in the post. What I dont have is any grease ... does anyone know where I can get some suitable grease for the job? (I work in Camberwell / drive home to Preston).

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    If you are near a Jaycar, they sell tubes of it for about $15

  3. #3
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Your best bet is Jaycar Coburg Sydney rd or Thomastown Settlement rd.
    Or Blackwoods sell it in larger quantities I think your nearest store is in Sydney rd Campbellfield.
    Hope this helps

  4. #4
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Bunnings has it too, in the plumbing department (at least they have in Port Melbourne).

  5. #5
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Dibartoli has it, but expensive!

  6. #6
    brett230873
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Quote Originally Posted by 78656278796E0C0 link=1260229686/0#0 date=1260229686
    ... does anyone know where I can get some suitable grease
    Ive just cleaned out the drip tray of my BBQ and surprisingly enough... no scrap that, Ive seen it at Bunnings also.

  7. #7
    Site Sponsor Di_Bartoli's Avatar
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    We use this one
    http://www.dibartoli.com.au/product_details.asp?pid=310
    Regards

    Renzo
    Di Bartoli Home Barista Centre

  8. #8
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Thanks found some Doust grease at Bunnings!

  9. #9
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Quote Originally Posted by 75686F757463010 link=1260229686/7#7 date=1260346034
    Thanks found some Doust grease at Bunnings!
    whereabouts

    went looking on wknd and could not find in plumbing area or tools
    B

  10. #10
    Coffee+carbon=heaven Mono's Avatar
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Quote Originally Posted by 1A3D36070B580 link=1260229686/8#8 date=1260767301
    whereabouts

    went looking on wknd and could not find in plumbing area or tools
    B
    Hi Ben, I also found it, I just walked a few isles, think it was near the teflon tapes and sealing compounds. Didnt take that much notice of what it was close to and am not sure that all Bunnings have the same layout.

    Sorry, Steve :-/

  11. #11
    TC
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    Re: Where to buy food grade grease

    Dragging up an oldie here.

    Site sponsor Bombora now have 2 excellent food grade lube products. We have added both to our e-shop range.

    Chris

  12. #12
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    Can I use the silicone lube for my o-rings on the stainless bolts that hold my boiler together so they don't seize or do I need a special "anti-seize" lubricant.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Lubricant should work.

    The problem with stainless threads is generally galling, which in turn can lead to seizing. Galling occurs when friction overpowers the oxide film on the stainless and it shears off, exposing the softer metal underneath.

    It follows that reducing the friction on the threads reduces the chance of galling:

    Make sure the threads are well formed, clean and lubricated. The bolt and its nut / tapped hole should turn easily by hand. If it doesn't, check the threads. If the bolt or nut threads are malformed, buy new bolts and nuts. If the hole thread is malformed re-tap it.

    Make sure the parts fit together properly and that the bolts can be threaded almost home by hand. If the bolt is being threaded against a force (eg pulling the parts into line) this greatly increases friction.

    Get them threaded almost home by hand then nip up the last bit with a hand spanner. Going by hand slows you down, less speed = less friction. If you need to use a power tool to turn the bolt stop and figure out what you are doing wrong.
    Last edited by Lyrebird; 5th November 2018 at 03:44 PM.
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  14. #14
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    G'day mate...

    Better off grabbing a tube of Copper Cote or Never Seez from your local Supercheap for these...

    Mal.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    It is generally not recommended to use a copper based antiseize on stainless, nickel is preferred. This is because copper is anodic to stainless by about 0.25V (depending on stainless grade, the better the stainless the higher the delta V).
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  16. #16
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    When I refurbished my machine 2 years ago, I obtained some food-grade (H1-rated for incidental food contact) anti-seize from the evilbay to apply on the boiler studs. It's metal free and was supposed to be odourless (but does have a very faint distinctive odour if you pay attention). The name was CRC SL35905. Not sure if it works as I haven't had the need to disassemble the boiler yet... there's also plenty other food-grade anti-seize but they all usually come in a big tub. Point is I think it's worth getting the food grade stuff just in case, although for boiler studs the chance of contact/backflow is minimal (you might accidentally smear it in the boiler surface or in the water path/tubes though).

    For o-ring, gaskets or any other parts that come in contact with water (for lubrication purpose, a separate function from seize prevention), I have been using Dow Corning/Molykote 111 for years and highly recommend it. That's also H1-rated, works well and is completely odourless.
    spin_addict likes this.

  17. #17
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyrebird View Post
    It is generally not recommended to use a copper based antiseize on stainless, nickel is preferred. This is because copper is anodic to stainless by about 0.25V (depending on stainless grade, the better the stainless the higher the delta V).
    Looks like Never Seez it is...
    Thanks Lb.

    NeverSeez.JPG

    Mal.
    Last edited by Dimal; 5th November 2018 at 09:49 PM.

  18. #18
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Don't think you need to use Food Safe anti-seize lube on boiler bolts though.
    The bolts generally sit outside the gasket or O-Ring seal...

    Mal.
    samuellaw178 likes this.

  19. #19
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    Inox MX6, I mostly use it for a dielectric grease for electrical connections, but also good for o-rings and would be perfect for coffee machines with its high temp tolerance. Most electrical suppliers should have this on the shelf.

    https://www.inoxmx.com/products/mx6-food-grade-grease/

    .

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShaunQ View Post
    Inox MX6, I mostly use it for a dielectric grease for electrical connections, but also good for o-rings and would be perfect for coffee machines with its high temp tolerance. Most electrical suppliers should have this on the shelf.
    .
    Also available at Jaycar. It’s a lot cheaper than the Molykote but I get the feeling the Molykote does a better job, although I haven’t really tested the two properly.

  21. #21
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by steve7 View Post
    Also available at Jaycar. It’s a lot cheaper than the Molykote but I get the feeling the Molykote does a better job, although I haven’t really tested the two properly.
    Yep. Jaycar has the 30 gram tube of Inox for $9.95 (Brisbane). It is a tan colour grease.

    I got the CRC 75 gram clear silicone grease for about $20 from Bursons Auto Parts although Autobarn, Repco and Hayman’s Electrical can also source it. Image below with info and product code number.

    56B69887-3E01-4E0B-9C33-DD025D01F37A.jpeg
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