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Thread: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

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    Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Last weekend, I dropped in to Coffee Barun. There, I saw two types of Brazil coffee beans for sale. Both had the same long name (after the Brazil part). Only one of them had an additional last word in the the name, something like "Superior".

    The sales girl told me that the first Brazil coffee had a "fruity" taste, and was suitable for drinks without milk, such as espresso. The other sort of the Brazil coffee had a "chocolatey" taste and was suitable for drinking with milk.

    I have been on look for an elusive coffee which appeals to my taste. I seem to like the South American coffees (Brazilian, Guatemalan) and Indonesian ones (Sumatra Mandehling, East Timor). I like Jamaican Blue Mountain because it is bitterless. I like the taste of the coffee made with percolator (thats how it was made in my childhood). But nowdays I prepare coffee with a stovetop moka pot. No milk. It appears that the sorts of coffee I am after are the types which consumed with milk according to the abovementioned classification. I did a search on the Internet, but could not find much. Maybe here, http://coffeegeek.com/forums/espresso/blends/49896 .

    Anyone has comments ? Say, I hit a coffee beans store. How do I choose the "cholocolatey" tasting coffee out of the offered array of sorts ? How do I find one with the low acidity ?



  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Hi Valerian,

    Well, I bought some really chocolatey ones (white chocolate I think it was) from a site sponsor before XMAS, but they probably wouldnt do your grinder much good.

    More seriously, I guess you could start with mocha beans/blends? A couple of the Ethiopian varieties (yirgacheffe??) taste a bit chocolatey to me.
    Cheers
    Mark

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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Thank you for your reply, Barry. Actually, the people in the forum link I gave above say that "acidity" (known as "fruity") is what putting them off. It appears I want low acidity, too. People say that the S. American coffees are known for low acidity, and the African coffees are known for high acidity. Someone on this forum recommended Yirgacheffe. I bought it, and I realised once more than I should keep away from African coffees.

    So... my question is if there is a universal marker saying "low acidity" ? Or, I should rely exclusively on the word of the seller ? The problem with the latter is that many hired shop assistants in reasonable places do not know what they are selling.


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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    No worries. Well, if you have a look inthe Bean Bay on this site, a number of roasted beans identify the relative acidity (e.g. Espresso Organic = low acid). Im sure lots of people more knowledgeable than myself will provide more structured advice.

  5. #5
    KJM
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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    There was a wonderful coffee event in 2011 called "Beanology" ::) at which we were very privileged to have one Joseph Riviera who is a coffee chemistry expert and consultant to most of the worlds big roasters.

    One of the most impressive demonstrations of how all this works was everyone getting a small shot of Nicaraguan COE, followed by the same thing with a tiny bit of malic acid added - which turned it into an "African" style coffee...

    The apparent acidity of coffee depends on quite a few things but origin and altitude pay a big part. Generically African bean are a bit more "acidic". Roast depth also influences the acidity (and chocolatey-ness!). So does the "age" of the roast.

    To give you a data point: the "KJM blend" starts life as a (IMHO!) a nice clean espresso blend after about 4 days. After about 7-10 days it becomes very chocolately indeed. I can manipulate the chocolate note to a small extent by increasing the depth of the roast. My latest batches of this have the Ethiopian beans substituted by Tanzanian Uru estate and it is very chocolatey!

    From my own personal experience, the beans that have "chocolatey" next to them in my notes are: Nicaraguan, Guatamalan, Costa Rican, Yemeni, Tanzanian, Kenyan, Ethiopian, Indian, Indo :-? So I think you might find trying to classify that taste profile by geographical origin problematic.

    You might like to look at the KJM blend and substitute the Ethiopian beans out and replace them with Indian Tiger Mountain - which will be a bit of a chocolate monster. The other aspect of taste is mouthfeel, and it was a bit of struggle to get that right with the KJM blend.

    Hope this helps.

    /Kevin

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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Ive just been though a half kg bag of Dimattinas La Tazza. When they say its dark roast, they aint kidding. It has a very dark chocolate aftertaste which I quite enjoyed. Next Ill give their "Espresso Bar" a try, which is said to have a chocolate aftertaste also. You should be able to order that almost anywhere in the country I would have thought. Im lucky enough to live 15 mins from their Perth office.

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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Thanks everyone for your replies. Whatever African coffee I got so far, it was sharp. So that I am sticking to the South American and Indonesian coffees.

    I decided to try to theory that "low acidity" coffee is actually what appeals to my taste. I went to Perfect Cup and bought a blend "Kilimanjaro/ Indian Mysor" which was said to have a low acidity. Well, I did not like it with my stovetop moka pot. It still was kind of sharp. However, at work, I used it with my electrical moka pot, and it came out least objectionable out of all coffees I tried with the electrical pot ! In other words, I got a proper coffee taste, while with the the other brands, the taste was overpowered with the foreign overtones.




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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Well if a bean is famous for its fruity or citric flavours then some roasters like to make those features pronounced when they are roasted. So hypothetically even if some Ethiopians are capable of more honey like or chocolate like characteristics the fruit/citrus is what will be what the roaster wants to showoff the most.

    Anyways im the opposite I much prefer acidic coffees and like them closer to underextracted in my espresso. :D

    Anyways not to start blaming the tools but sometimes if a coffee tastes too sharp it could be because the water isnt hot enough or grind is too coarse and coffee ends up being underextracted. This shouldnt really happen because moka pots tend to burn coffee but you did mention that your electric moka worked better than your stovetop so it is something to think about.


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    Re: Coffee sorts -- the chocolatey ones ?

    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by 5C184E5D280 link=1326860066/7#7 date=1327579482
    Anyways im the opposite I much prefer acidic coffees and like them closer to underextracted in my espresso.
    Well, thats what I found: I can drink the acidic coffee and do not be put off by its sharpness only if I underextract it. Say, make a larger grind.

    I discovered I like the "earthy" flavour of Indoneasion coffees (scrap all that crap about "fruity" and "chockolaty" classification). Probably, coffee arrived fermented into my home country... and thats the falvour I got used to. I have to test this hypothesis.

    (Also, there was some coffee which went from Hong Kong to Europe, I think. It took half a year of delivery on the board of the sailing ships and it all was fermented and salted. I do not remember at the moment which coffee was that. I should try it, too.)





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