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Thread: Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

  1. #1
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I will be going away on a trip where I was thinking of bringing my coffee with. Assuming I have a grinder as well (required for aeropress) has anyone tried a taste test on both? Which should I go for? Nespresso I have. Aeropress I have to buy. Nesspresso is one machine. With Aeropress I need to bring a few things with me. (I drink caps and piccolos)

    Which one would you go for?

  2. #2
    caffeinated lemoo's Avatar
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    hmm
    i'm not even sure the 2 are in the same category to be comparable I had a laugh

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    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Quote Originally Posted by lemoo View Post
    hmm
    i'm not even sure the 2 are in the same category to be comparable I had a laugh
    I guess you are right. But everything has a context and perspective depending on which camp you are in. Can you elaborate your point of view?

  4. #4
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    An Aeropress produces a very clean strong plunger style of coffee. What you decide to do if you want to pursue drinking something with milk in it depends on your preferences. I started adding recently boiled water (not too recently), then a little milk. With some experimentation I decided that I preferred a strong short base from the Aeropress, and some microwaved/saucepan heated milk. Either way it is quite a different drink to your standard latte / cap. I like it for a change, but wouldn't do it every day. I ended out investing in a Baachi (pricey) for the times when I go away (if travelling in car) and for when my main machine goes in for a service. But that's not for everyone.

    What you choose to do probably depends on a) how much you like the Nespresso product (I'm not a fan but have had much much worse) b) how long you are going away for c) how much spare luggage capacity you've got and d) culinary facilities where you'll be staying.

    Just my 2 bits worth.
    BOSW

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    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Ooo. Bacchi looks good

    You are right about the facilities there. Using the aeropress I'd have to bring quite a few things. I'm leaning towards Nespresso for convenience.

  6. #6
    enjoy black coffee JamesM's Avatar
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    Aeropress is most commonly used to produce a nice clean black filter coffee. Not an espresso based drink, not a milk drink (although it can try).

    Don't mistake it's brew for a long-black style brew. This is the kind of brew that can easily convince you to enjoy black coffee.

    For me, without a doubt, it's the ideal travel coffee rig. You can also fit a porlex hand grinder right inside it.

    Aeropress is an immersion brewer, like a clever coffee dripper, french press, or Syphon. The result in the cup from Aeropress can match the other brew methods easily.

    Here's a great recipe to start with:

    15gm medium grinds, 200gm water at 92C (or 30-40 sec off the boil). Invert aeropress, add grinds, add water, stir, wait 1min, stir again, put the lid on, flip it over and press for 20 seconds. There's more drib drab on my blog

    It's fast, easy, enjoyable, clean up, portable. Unfortunately it can only really brew one cup at a time, which is fine if it's just you.

    If you will be regularly brewing for more than one person I would recommend the Clever Coffee Dripper instead which can do a 400+ gm brew (for two) with the same ease as the aeropress.

    If you insist on milk drinks, you could still experiment with the aeropress. I honestly don't know, I haven't tried it, but I don't see why you couldn't! Some get great results!

    I wouldn't touch the nespresso. Not because I don't like it, but because I fail to see how it's good for travel, or the environment.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesM View Post
    ........For me, without a doubt, it's the ideal travel coffee rig......It's fast, easy, enjoyable, clean up, portable.

    I wouldn't touch the nespresso......because I fail to see how it's good for travel.......
    +1..........

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    They dont really compare IMO.

    If you want a versatile piece of equipment with many many variations on how you can brew FRESH coffee, get the Aeropress. There is James method above and contrary to what he says i can get 2 pretty decent coffees (with a bit of milk) out of the AP using my preferred method and doubling the quantity's found here - http://coffeesnobs.com.au/brewing-eq...tml#post474016

    On the other hand nespresso = bland quick hot coffee hit.

    You can use AP for cold brewing as well, great for pulling SO of the roaster just after first crack. Now that makes for an interesting long black - milk only ruins cold brew for my tastes.
    Your only limited by your imagination in finding the taste that suites YOU.

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    The aeropress and ceramic manual grinder gets my vote, I travel with them often. You can make pretty much any style of coffee with the aeropress - if you keep things short and sweet it makes a very acceptable espresso substitute, I usually add microwaved milk to this for a nice smoot cup. I usually manage to make enough for 2 in the aeropress.

    I'm not sure how the nespresso fits in this box, but given my limited experience I wouldn't ever consider buying one either.

  10. #10
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    How long is the trip?
    (that will change some of the answers you might get)

    I think the answer to your question is BLACK and WHITE... literally.

    BLACK
    If you want to drink black coffee...
    Get an aeropress. If you are going away for a couple of days pre-grind and bag.
    If you are going away for a week then grind into 3 small bags and seal them.
    If you are going away for fortnight then take a grinder (hand or electric)

    WHITE
    If you are going to drink white coffee then...
    Take the Nespresso you already have (if you like it's output).
    Buy a stovetop (Sorrentina, Otto, Bacchi)
    Take a couple of bottles of cold drip concentrate CoffeeSnobs - BeanBay
    Buy a secondhand Silvia / Breville / Sunbeam

    I don't disagree with the replies you already have but most are talking about drinking it black, if you can't do that then the options are more limited.

    When I travel the aeropress goes with me. Light, small, airport xray friendly and I pre-grind a weeks coffee sealed in multiple bags and then source local coffee at the destination. ...but I drink black!

  11. #11
    enjoy black coffee JamesM's Avatar
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    awesome replies, and great options Andy!

    I guess if it had to be milk, I'd experiment more with aeropress. I suppose you could attempt an espresso-style shot large enough for two drinks, and then add the milk. trial and error

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    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Thank you all for the replies. I've only started one getting more serious with coffee in the last month. I've been surviving on nespresso for the last 3 years. So I kinda don't mind the taste. But will surely crave the piccolos I'm making from my BDB.

    I'm going away on a church camp up in tambourine over a weekend. So stove top is out. I might not even get the usual microwave and fridge at my close convenience. They might have it at the kitchen hall.

    That's why I was thinking of the Nespresso. Just new water and PowerPoint. Will knick the milk from the main kitchen enough for 2. The room would have power.

    On a longer term, I might get the AP to experiment as well. And eventually do away with the Nespresso. I need to recoup from my dent in the wallet for the BDB+smart grinder :P

    For now. Everyone in the family knows how to use the Nespresso and it has decaf that is ok. Used for visiting friends for dinner who wants a decaf coffee. Since I don't stock decaf beans for my BDB. I am just having an issue justifying the super occasional use of the Nespresso now. The occasional times when I'm not around and people at home wants hassle free coffee, and also the occasional decaf drinking visitors. It still has warranty and I have a stash of the limited edition pods. If I sell them all off I could almost make up for the BDB!

    Hence the dilemma.

  13. #13
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    The aeropress makes great white coffee: make it strong, and instead of milk use just a dash of light cream (or cream/milk mix) to get the right colour. Aeropress doesn't make an espresso that can stand the amount of milk in a latte or cappuccino.

    Nespresso makes an alternative to instant, not a real coffee at all.

    Greg

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    Hmm I bought an Aeropress for use at work instead of instant/plunger.

    Very portable if you get rid of some of the odds and sods it comes with. Will make a good black coffee. Quite easy to clean up as you just disassemble and run under a tap.

    Not sure how any current model Nespresso adds up to being a portable machine, though. I wouldn't bother unless you were going on a holiday to stay at a house somewhere for a fortnight or something like that as you'd have to make sure the thing was empty and dry etc.

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    Senior Member DavidW1960's Avatar
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    I got an aeropress and hario hand grinder for travel too and highly recommend the combo - but I drink blacks most of the time.

  16. #16
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Sorted! Will get used to the aeropress and sell nespresso.

    Another thing I read is the difference between the clear aeropress and the blueish one. Do you guys have the different ones? Apparently the clear plastic ones are lousier?

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenvase View Post
    Another thing I read is the difference between the clear aeropress and the blueish one.
    I'm guessing that was on an american website, certainly hope it wasnt here!
    Sheeze, it's just plastic.
    I own all the colours and have certainly never noticed a difference.

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brokenvase View Post
    Sorted! Will get used to the aeropress and sell nespresso.

    Another thing I read is the difference between the clear aeropress and the blueish one. Do you guys have the different ones? Apparently the clear plastic ones are lousier?
    The clear one is less likely to be stolen by a bower bird.

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    I seriously need to see what Drugs were taken before coming to the idea that colour of plastics changed the taste

    For the record there are in my tastebuds opinions far better travel options if your not to restricted on space than a Aeropress! A good read in the Manual Brewing Section is in order

    edited presso to Aeropress Doh
    Last edited by beanflying; 26th August 2012 at 09:28 AM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Won't change the flavour, but the clear one is BPA free.

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    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Quote Originally Posted by beanflying View Post
    I seriously need to see what Drugs were taken before coming to the idea that colour of plastics changed the taste

    For the record there are in my tastebuds opinions far better travel options if your not to restricted on space than a Presso! A good read in the Manual Brewing Section is in order
    No I actually meant the build quality. The clear one deteriorated very quickly.

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    This from coffeegeek.

    Posted Tue Feb 28, 2012, 1:17pm
    Subject: Re: Question on Aeropress materials (regarding BPA content)

    The original AeroPress coffee makers were made of a clear but slightly bluish polycarbonate. Laboratory tests done by an independent lab that were sensitive down to 2 parts per billion were completely unable to detect BPA in coffee brewed in a well used polycarbonate AeroPress. Nevertheless to completely eliminate any perception of risk, we switched in August of 2009 to manufacturing the AeroPress out of a BPA free copolyester. BPA free means the material does not contain any BPA.

    Since August of 2009, every AeroPress manufactured has been made of the BPA free copolyester. The copolyester is a completely clear material. Initially the AeroPress coffee makers made of copolyester were completely clear. Near the end of 2010, we started adding a gray tint to the copolyester.

    Most retailers that sell the AeroPress coffee maker receive frequent shipments from Aerobie, Inc. Amazon receives weekly shipments. It is hard to imagine an old polycarbonate AeroPress from over two and a half years ago still sitting in a retailer's inventory.

    I hope this clarifies the AeroPress material question.

    Alex Tennant, General Manager, Aerobie, Inc.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanflying View Post

    For the record there are in my tastebuds opinions far better travel options if your not to restricted on space than a Presso! A good read in the Manual Brewing Section is in order
    The discussion is about the Aeropress.....not the Presso I think?? I suspect that your point still holds with respect to my tastebuds and the Aeropress, but it is super-portable, and makes a nice drink. My Bacchi is fantastic (makes a genuine espresso equal to that of my e61 with my non-pro skill set), but the Bacchi weighs easily more than 5kgs, is the size of football, requires access to a stovetop etc, and costs a monkey. Absolutely no regrets at buying Aeropress with coava disk...spends most of its time in my office, but comes with me when I get on a plane.

    Cheers
    BOSW

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    Brain fail meant to type Aeropress. To many late nights I think.

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    I personally like the aeropress. Good value may to make good coffee.

  26. #26
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Just an update. I bought the aeropress and sold the nespresso :P

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    You may want to experiment with the coffee/water ratio if you want to add milk.
    A friend recently bought an aeropress, and he claims to make a good late by making a very strong short black and adding hot milk.
    I haven't tried on yet, so I can't comment from personal experience.

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    he claims to make a good late by making a very strong short black and adding hot milk.
    I dont think that could be called a "latte" .. to do that you need textured milk.
    His would be more like an "americano" ?

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    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Sounds similar to what I frequently do at work except I use a little cream instead, if I don't want it black for whatever reason.
    Works quite well, I like the mouth feel that the higher fat content gives.
    Not really sure what to call it though - the result of adding milk or cream is a bit like the ubiquitous "white" reply to the "how do you have it?" of the instant beverage consumer crowd...

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    Ah, but he does texture the milk, he heats it in a microwave and then froths it with a little battery operated whizzer that he got from Ikea.

    I have sampled his Plunger version of a latte made the same way, very strong short black from the plunger, heated, textured milk - not quite as good as my own latte or flat white using an espresso shot, but quite a nice cuppa.

  31. #31
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leograyson View Post
    Ah, but he does texture the milk, he heats it in a microwave and then froths it with a little battery operated whizzer that he got from Ikea.

    I have sampled his Plunger version of a latte made the same way, very strong short black from the plunger, heated, textured milk - not quite as good as my own latte or flat white using an espresso shot, but quite a nice cuppa.
    Fair enough. I've tried lots of options with the Aeropress and milk/cream coffee. For me I prefer to treat the Aeropress as a 'different' type of coffee, and find that it suits the the 'americano' with a small amount of milk or cream as B52 describes above. I might have a different opinion if I was making 90% of my coffees with it though (I use it sporadically in the office).

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    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Ahh, I see, yep that works too. I'm quite a fan of the aeropress - for such a simple device it's quite versatile and can emulate many different extraction methods. Most importantly to me is the clean cup it delivers, and the quick cleanup.

  33. #33
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    This has been educational. I have used French Press a great deal but had never heard of Aeropress.
    I have never been able to replicate the quality many seem to claim for French Press and gave up on them a long time ago.
    I feel I get better results from my Dripolator, however it is a large bulky device unsuited to travel.
    So - my big question is whether people think Aeropress is a lot better than French Press. (I drink it black)
    The Aeropress looks very portable and would be a good option to have when away from home.

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    I prefer the Aeropress (with Able Brewing's Disk) to french press, but the real draw is that the Aeropress is versatile, quick and portable. Done right, both approaches will produce great coffee.

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    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    I think so - at least it's easier to get a good result in the cup without much effort.
    I use mine at work - and my method is out of necessity very pragmatic, I simply don't have the time for some of the rather, ah, elaborate preparation methods many seem to employ with the aeropress. I use mine pretty much like the instructions say: Two scoops of coffee (...after single dosing the grinder a couple of times to gauge correct time I use a timed dose on the smart grinder that sits on my desk) ground somewhere between fine drip and espresso, wet the rubber plunger, fill the measuring part of the plunger to "2" with basically boiling water from the zip, give it a few seconds to cool a little, pour onto the coffee, stir with the paddle for 10 - 15secs (depends on the coffee), fit plunger, slowly ease it down (20 secs or so). Then fill cup as needed with hot water. Works well, and total time to brew is very short, probably 2mins including cleanup - I recycle the filter for the day's usage. Struggle to a brew in 2 minutes including cleanup with a french press and get something drinkable!

    You can also use a true espresso grind if you like for 1 scoop / water level 1. Works a treat too.

    I'm sure some of the other methods will achieve a great result too, if you've the time.

  36. #36
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    This has been educational. I have used French Press a great deal but had never heard of Aeropress.
    I have never been able to replicate the quality many seem to claim for French Press and gave up on them a long time ago.
    I feel I get better results from my Dripolator, however it is a large bulky device unsuited to travel.
    So - my big question is whether people think Aeropress is a lot better than French Press. (I drink it black)
    The Aeropress looks very portable and would be a good option to have when away from home.
    Agree with all of the above comments. I just used it today to make Vietnamese coffee! Awesome! I like the versatility of it. To make many different tasting coffees if you wanted to. Or just keep to one formula and its easy and portable.

    Also as a randomly interesting fact. They have competitions and championships for aeropress brewing. Not sure if there are the same for French press??? :P

  37. #37
    Senior Member DavidW1960's Avatar
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    Ok. I really don't get reusing the filter. They are cheap as chips. I did get a coava disk but not to says a few cents.

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    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidW1960 View Post
    Ok. I really don't get reusing the filter. They are cheap as chips...
    Yeah, agree but I do notice a (slight) paper taste if I don't rinse first, which would mean an extra trip to the tea room, or taking the ground coffee with in another container... I've enough to carry with the press and cup. This way there's only a bit of paper taste in the first cup of the day, and rinsing it well after use seems to remove enough of the residual coffee that I don't notice any detrimental effects on subsequent brews - this could be due to the relatively short rest time it's given.
    I do intend to get a coava disk or similar at some stage.

    When I use it at home though, I do use a fresh filter each time and tend to rinse it first - but in this case I've the time to do that. But probably didn't have the time to warm up the BDB .

  39. #39
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidW1960 View Post
    Ok. I really don't get reusing the filter. They are cheap as chips. I did get a coava disk but not to says a few cents.
    Though never personally proven, I've read somewhere that reused paper filter makes it taste better... -.-"

  40. #40
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    I had actually shelved my Aeropress as I hated what the paper filters did in the cup.

    I much prefer the Able/Coava and use the Aeropress regularly now. For me, money well spent.

  41. #41
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    Was having coffee with a friend in a favourite coffee shop and noticed that they had a new type of dripolator on display.
    This one processes the coffee into a kind of vacuum flask - no heating plate. But that's not what I wanted to tell you.
    Whilst discussing the 'dripolator', I mentioned Aeropress. In a flash the staff member whipped out an Aeropress and proceeded to make us a sample cup from it.
    It was not as strong as I would like but it was certainly smooth and seemed to have the potential to produce a really good long black if more grounds were used.
    As mentioned previously, there is no substitute for machine espresso, but there are alternative styles that are quite palatable.
    Next time in they are going to fire up the 'dripolator' so we can see what's it's got.
    How good is a cafe that goes to this kind of trouble for customers.

  42. #42
    Senior Member brokenvase's Avatar
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    Aeropress vs. Nesspresso

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Was having coffee with a friend in a favourite coffee shop and noticed that they had a new type of dripolator on display.
    This one processes the coffee into a kind of vacuum flask - no heating plate. But that's not what I wanted to tell you.
    Whilst discussing the 'dripolator', I mentioned Aeropress. In a flash the staff member whipped out an Aeropress and proceeded to make us a sample cup from it.
    It was not as strong as I would like but it was certainly smooth and seemed to have the potential to produce a really good long black if more grounds were used.
    As mentioned previously, there is no substitute for machine espresso, but there are alternative styles that are quite palatable.
    Next time in they are going to fire up the 'dripolator' so we can see what's it's got.
    How good is a cafe that goes to this kind of trouble for customers.
    Where is this place?

  43. #43
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    The cafe is Sexie Coffie in Rockhampton. A group of people who are passionate about coffee.
    Not a place to sit about for ages (we do anyhow) as it is noisy with no particular ambience and the aircon is too cold, but the coffee and service is great.



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